Ozarks

This photo of Ozark Air Lines DC-3 plane by the Arch was taken in the 1960s after the Arch was completed.
Courtesy: Ozark Silver Swallows

Ozark Air Lines began operating in 1950, with commercial flights between St. Louis and Chicago and enroute stops at Springfield, Decatur, and Champaign Illinois. But in 1986, Trans World Airlines (TWA) took over the airline, its routes and aircraft, leaving behind memories of the regional airline.

At 5p.m. on July 21, the Tivoli Theatre will screen “The Swallows’ Tale: The Story of Ozark Air Lines,” a short documentary about the St. Louis-based airline. The film will air as part of Cinema St. Louis Filmmaker’s Showcase.

Paddlefish can live 100 years.
Dennis Chamberlin | medium.com

Caviar poaching has arrived in in the Ozarks.

Like sturgeon, female paddlefish bloat with tiny eggs, and a single paddlefish can contain 10 pounds of roe, worth as much as $40,000 when labeled and sold as high-grade Russian caviar. Game warden Rob Farr, who patrols rivers and reservoirs in central Missouri, now finds himself battling intrigue that extends to Russia, Kazhakstan and Iran.

Medium.com has the story from the Food and Environment Reporting Network.

National Park Service

(Updated at 3:39 p.m., February 20)

Missouri senators passed a resolution to block the federal government's proposed changes in tourist restrictions at the Ozark National Scenic Riverways. The resolution passed on a 23-8 vote on Thursday and now heads to the House.

via National Park Service

 Updated 2:40 p.m. Jan. 22:

The National Park Service is holding the last public meeting on its proposed management plan for the Ozark National Scenic Riverways tonight in Kirkwood. See below for more details.

Updated 3:10 p.m. and 4:40 p.m. Jan. 7:

(via Flickr/solviturambulando)

Black bears can now be found in southern Missouri, thanks to a reintroduction program more than fifty years ago.

The University of Missouri has worked in conjunction with other researchers to trace the origins of the bears.

Researchers used genetic footprints and hair samples to identify which bears came from reintroduced groups in Arkansas, and which were indigenous. 

Washington University researcher Kaitlyn Faries did research on the bears at MU during initial studies in 2007.

(Mark Morgan/University of Missouri)

A statewide coalition of environmental organizations is urging the National Park Service to protect Ozark rivers.

Representatives of the groups were in Washington, D.C., today meeting with the Park Service.

They submitted more than 4,400 signed petitions asking the federal agency to adopt a strong management plan for the Current River and its major tributary, the Jacks Fork.

The U.S. Forest Service has released a final environmental impact statement for its new management plan for the nation's public forests.

The new Forest Planning Rule will guide the management of America's 193-million acres of national forest lands, and provide the framework for local forest managers to develop their own forest-specific management plans.