Parkway School District | St. Louis Public Radio

Parkway School District

Tricia Frank lays out books in community room of Woodhollow Apartments in Maryland Heights Friday, June 22, 2018. The Parkway North High School teacher delivers books because the nearby St. Louis County Library branch is closed for renovation. 6/22/18
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Tricia Frank’s car breaking down this spring was a good thing: Now she has more storage space in her new, larger vehicle.

Frank is using that new car to deliver books to four apartment complexes in the northern part of the Parkway School District in lieu of the St. Louis County Library branch, which is closed this summer for renovation.

After a meeting about Mackenzie Village's possible disincorporation, a few residents spoke about running to become village trustees. Village residents on Tuesday voted 18-15 in favor of dissolving the municipality.
File Photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

By a three-vote margin, residents of Mackenzie Village — a 72-year-old community in south St. Louis County — have voted to dissolve and become an unincorporated part of the county.

Tuesday’s vote was 18-15. The 33 votes represent roughly a quarter of the village’s 134 residents.

The village is the third small town in St. Louis county to dissolve or merge since 2011. The decision was among the most closely-watched issues on Tuesday.

Candidates for the Parkway School Board listen to a question during a candidate forum Monday, March 12, 2018, at Parkway Central Middle School.
File Photo | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Parkway School District parents filled a middle school cafeteria for a school board candidate forum Monday night that usually attracts only enough parents to fill a single classroom.

Interest in the race spiked in January, when social media posts by one of the candidates were circulated among parent groups. Several parents said the views expressed on Twitter by Jeanie Ames are racist and out of line with the mission of the west St. Louis County district.

Niah Ester and Anjali Adhikari pose for a portrait at the annual Educators for Social Justice conference.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

When Anjali Adhikari and Niah Ester teamed up for a class project last summer, they had one goal – to teach educators at Northeast Middle School all about microaggressions.

The seventh graders never imagined their work would make it from their Creve Coeur school into classrooms across the St. Louis region. But since then, they’ve created and led training sessions for dozens of teachers, counselors and school administrators.

Sasha Walchli, an English language teacher at Parkway's Green Trails Elementary, works with third-graders on learning continents. Walchi has 43 students at the school, twice as many as when she started 10 years ago.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Radi and Hadi Hamdan’s English is getting better, slowly. Sitting in the living room of their Florissant home on a recent evening, they struggled to get through more than introducing themselves before switching back to Arabic.

The 12-year-old twins moved to the northern St. Louis suburb from the West Bank last summer, finally reuniting with their father, who has lived in the United States for two decades.

The twins are seventh-graders in Hazelwood School District’s West Middle School. Radi likes art class. Hadi’s favorite subject is math. They also need intense English-language instruction in order to follow other courses.

St. Louis city students ride a Voluntary Interdistrict Choice Corporation, VICC, school bus on May 11, 2017.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Jeanie Ames is running for the Parkway school board on a manifesto of good taxpayer stewardship and continued academic excellence where “all learners ... feel safe, appreciated, and challenged.”

But several parents say Ames’ social media postings portray someone with racist viewpoints.

She is among five candidates who filed last week to run for the Parkway Board of Education. Kevin Seltzer, Jonathan Taylor, Matthew Schindler and Amy Bonnett are also running. Ames' candidacy is igniting an unusually high level of interest for a school board race still months away.

Kindergartener Maram Alhamadah sings an alphabet song at Nahed Chapman New American Academy, one of two programs dedicated to English-language learners at St. Louis Public Schools.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

A $2.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education will make it easier for three Missouri districts to meet new federal accountability metrics for students learning English.

East St. Louis instructional coach Tracee Wells taught AVID to Chaya Cary, 16. Cary is studying at Southwestern Illinois College in the fall of 2017. "We don't hear enough about these kinds of stories coming out of East St. Louis," Wells said.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Belleville’s two public high schools have doubled the number of low-income students and students of color in advanced placement courses in the coming school year — part of a statewide goal to enroll 100,000 underrepresented students in such classes by 2019.

And East St. Louis Senior High is encouraging students to try more rigorous coursework even if they aren’t the top students.

Experts say high schoolers who take challenging classes have a leg up in college. But studies show black students, Latino students and low-income students are less likely to take them.

Hazelwood West seniors Yonnas Wole, Richard Spivey and Mallory Bachheit talk while they wait for district administrators to respond to their call for a meeting on Thurs., May 18, 2017.
File photo | Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

A semester after changes to Missouri’s criminal code sparked concern that school fights could result in felony charges, St. Louis-area school districts say there’s been little impact.

Yet, several districts have amended or are working to update discipline policies and behavior programs partly in response to the new law.

Mya Petty poses for a portrait before graduation last week.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Since second grade, Mya Petty has taken an hour-long bus ride from Baden, her mostly-black north St. Louis neighborhood, to Chesterfield – where most of her classmates were white.

The recently graduated 18-year-old is one of thousands of students in St. Louis’ long-running school desegregation program, Voluntary Interdistrict Choice Corporation. Last year, administrators voted to bring the decades-long program to a close.

Hanna Woods Principal Patrick Shelton, Parkway Superintendent Keith Marty and St. Louis Children's Hospital emergency medicine director Dr. Kimberly Quayle brief members of the media on the condition of the children involved in a bus crash May 11, 2017.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Thirteen St. Louis elementary school students received minor injuries Thursday when their school bus crashed through a guardrail and ran down an embankment on Interstate 44. The bus driver, who police said swerved to avoid a car, was hospitalized but not seriously injured.

 

All but one of the students had been discharged from St. Louis Children’s Hospital by early afternoon. They live in St. Louis and were headed to a Parkway district school, where they are enrolled through the region’s voluntary desegregation program.

Updated 11:55 a.m. April 14 with comments from MassResistance — Parents and students say an organization identified as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center is involving itself in a school district in west St. Louis County.

MassResistance Missouri opposes the Parkway School Districts’ sex-education curriculum, which includes lessons about contraception, sexual orientation and gender identity.

Eighth-graders watch President Donald Trump's inaugural address during class at North Kirkwood Middle School.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Eighth-grade students at North Kirkwood Middle School began an extended social studies class today, Inauguration Day, with a bit of political therapy. Teachers had them write down everything negative about the 2016 presidential campaign and election. There was no sharing, though peeks over shoulders gleaned key words like emails and racism.

Then the tearing began.

school buses
Flickr

After area school superintendents voted Friday to phase out the current race-based student transfer program – and possibly replace it with a new one down the road – those who have been part of the program so far cited a lot of reasons it should continue.

Harlan Hodge, a city resident who graduated in 1992 from Parkway North High School, put his experience this way:

“The kids at our school, the teachers lovingly embraced us the same way they have everywhere else. It really became about excellence. I’m as committed to Parkway as I was 25 years ago when I started. I believe in the school district. I believe in teachers. I believe in our education. It was a great experience.”

teaching
St. Louis Public Radio file photo

After 25 years as a gym teacher, Annalee Zweig knows a lot of different exercises. But she had never encountered the hoops she had to jump through to get jobs as a substitute teacher.

Zweig subs in Parkway, where she taught at four elementary schools before retiring five years ago. This past year, Parkway — along with Normandy and Maplewood Richmond Heights — contracted with a division of Kelly Services, the temporary help company, to recruit, place and employ substitute teachers.

Spelling Bee win gives area teen more than prize money

Dec 30, 2015
COURTESY OF SCRIPPS NATIONAL SPELLING BEE

Immediately after winning the National Spelling Bee Gokul Venkatachalam was thrust into the media spotlight. He appeared on morning talk shows and Jimmy Kimmel Live. He traveled from D.C. to New York, to Los Angeles, and back again before returning to Chesterfield. By Venkatahalam’s estimation he talked to roughly 70 news outlets.

Gokul Venkatachalam talks with media as his younger brother holds the National Spelling Bee trophy
Courtesy of Scripps National Spelling Bee

Last night, one word stood between 14-year-old Chesterfield resident Gokul Venkatachalam, $35,000 and a National Spelling Bee championship. That word was “nunatak” which Merriam-Webster defines as “a hill or mountain completely surrounded by glacial ice.” When the final word was announced Venkatachalam said he knew what to do.

“I was just thinking focus and get my word right.”

(Courtesy Photo Provided by the Publisher)

Some people know Travis Stork as the star of season eight of "The Bachelor." Some know him as the host of “The Doctors,” a syndicated talk show now in its sixth season. But in addition to being a TV celebrity, Stork is a working emergency room physician and a graduate of Parkway West High School.

He was scheduled to be in St. Louis today as part of tour for his new book, “The Doctor’s Diet: Dr. Travis Stork’s STAT Program to Help You Lose Weight & Restore Your Health,” but due to the weather, his trip has been postponed. He joined the conversation today via phone.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Winifred Crock devotes herself to music in every aspect of her life, and with every rehearsal or private lesson, enriches the lives of her students. The Parkway Central High School Orchestra Director will be named the St. Louis Symphony’s 2013 Educator of the Year later this week and, as a strong supporter of the symphony, is thrilled.

Morning headlines: Thursday, February 9, 2012

Feb 9, 2012
Flickr | orangeacid

Parkway School District to cut spending

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Parkway School Board has approved cutting spending by about $7.5 million to $9.6 million during the next two school years. The school board approved the cuts Wednesday night.

Reductions include eliminating 20 positions from administration and support staff, mostly through attrition.

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