Pat Quinn

St. Louis County Executive-elect Steve Stenger talks to St. Louis Public Radio reporters Nov. 5, 2014, during a recording of the 'Politically Speaking' podcast.
Chris McDaniel / St. Louis Public Radio

Wednesday on “St. Louis on the Air,” we gathered our political reporters to recap Tuesday’s election. The consensus: Republicans ruled the night.

“It was a Republican bloodbath, nationally and regionally,” said Jo Mannies, St. Louis Public Radio political reporter. “But it also shows that St. Louis County is definitely Democratic turf because the only two Democratic candidates — big names — who remained standing were Steve Stenger and Jill Schupp.”

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin knows firsthand the difficulty in getting a minimum wage increase passed through a legislative body. 

The Illinois Democrat was unsuccessful in getting the U.S. Senate to increase the federal minimum wage this year. Even if Senate Republicans hadn’t filibustered that effort, it would likely have gone nowhere in the GOP-controlled House.

(Flickr/Charleston's TheDigitel)

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn’s proposal to give Illinois homeowners’ a guaranteed $500 property tax refund could leave most renters out in the cold, according to tax experts and renters’ rights groups.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Illinois residents would continue paying a 5-percent income tax rate under the much-anticipated budget proposal Gov. Pat Quinn presented Wednesday. 

Illinois' income tax rate is supposed to expire in January, midway through the fiscal year. But Quinn says that would cause "savage cuts" to schools and other critical state services. Instead, the governor wants to make the higher income tax rate permanent.

The numbers look bad for Illinois Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn.

Illinois has remained in lousy shape throughout Quinn's five years in office.

Illinois Holds College Financial Aid Workshops

Feb 2, 2014
Illinois Student Assistance Commission

Illinois governor Pat Quinn has announced free workshops across the state for college students and their parents to get advice on acquiring financial aid. The workshops will be conducted throughout February, which is Financial Aid Awareness Month.

Experts with the Illinois Student Assistance Commission will help families understand and complete the commonly-used FAFSA, or Free Application for Student Aid.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A hike in the minimum wage, sending more children to preschool and more grants for low-income college students are all part of the agenda Governor Pat Quinn laid out Wednesday in his State of the State address.

Five years to the day after he first became governor, Pat Quinn tried to make the case that Illinois is "making a comeback." It's also the anniversary of when lawmakers removed his predecessor from office. Ex-Gov. Rod Blagojevich is now serving a federal prison sentence for corruption.

Quinn says he's helped restore integrity to state government.

Illinois Sends $7 Million To Prison Diversion Program

Dec 29, 2013
Flickr |neil conway

 

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn’s office has announced $7 million in grants aimed at funneling non-violent offenders away from prison and into community-based services. 

The funds come through Adult Redeploy Illinois, a program that encourages local jurisdictions to treat and supervise certain offenders, using tools like drug courts and mental health courts.

Quinn's office says the program saves up to $17,000 per year for each offender.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn has appointed the seven men and women he wants to review objections raised by local or state police to applications for concealed-carry permits.

Remko van Dokkum | Flickr

Tony Arnold contributed reporting from Chicago.

Some Illinois residents trying to sign up for health insurance through the new exchange program yesterday ran  into technical glitches.

Consumers reported waits of 20 minutes or more on the hotline, or errors while trying to access the website.

Gov. Pat Quinn called the glitches an expected part of rolling out a new program this large.

Brian Mackey, Illinois Public Radio

Former White House Chief of Staff Bill Daley will not run for Illinois governor after all. His campaign says Daley will explain more at a press conference in Chicago Tuesday morning. 

Daley has flirted with running for office before, only to back out.  This time, he insisted he was in it for keeps.

"I'm committed to running for governor," Daley said in a recent campaign video. "There is no exploratory piece in this anymore."

But Monday night, Daley's campaign confirmed he's dropping out of the race. 

In an interview on WGN-TV, Daley explained his decision.

Governor Pat Quinn departs today for the annual Midwest U.S.-Japan Association Conference, where he will speak with Japanese business leaders. The governor says he's confident he can drum up support for Illinois business, despite the relatively poor condition of Illinois' economy. 

The most recent numbers, from last month, say 9.2 percent of Illinoisans who are looking for work can’t find it. That’s the second-worst unemployment rate in the U.S., behind only Nevada.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Gov. Pat Quinn says a lawsuit over his decision to suspend lawmaker pay for failing to act on the state pension crisis will be a "landmark" case.

Quinn attended a court hearing Tuesday involving a lawsuit filed by Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton to force Quinn and Comptroller Judy Baar Topinka to issue paychecks.

(via Flickr/jglazer75)

The leaders of the Illinois House and Senate are filing a lawsuit challenging Gov. Pat Quinn's halting lawmaker pay over the state's pension gridlock. 

House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton called Quinn's action  "purely political and unconstitutional." All three men are Democrats.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Gov. Pat Quinn, who cut his political teeth during the rancorous reign of the combative Dan Walker, is biting back in a fashion that evokes instructive memories of his former boss.

(via Flickr/SenRockefeller)

Attorney General Lisa Madigan says she'll seek another term instead of running for Illinois governor next year.

In a Monday statement the Chicago Democrat says she's been considering the decision for months but that she enjoys her current job.  She says she considered the gubernatorial run because of the "need for effective management" and frustration from others about a lack of movement on major issues.

Madigan hadn't given any hints about her decision, telling reporters earlier Monday that she was still thinking it over.

(Kristi Luther/St. Louis Public Radio)

On Monday, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn paid a visit to the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge in East St. Louis.

Quinn said the bridge will reduce congestion and pollution and praised the jobs the project has created. He also hopes the project nurtures a positive relationship between Missouri and Illinois.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 11:55 a.m. with reporting by Illinois Public Radio's Brian Mackey.

Governor Pat Quinn Wednesday used his veto power to eliminate salaries for Illinois legislators. Quinn says until lawmakers fix the state's pension problem, they shouldn't get paid.

On Illinois' $100 billion unfunded pension liability Quinn has been setting deadlines for more than a year.

Until now, there haven't been any direct consequences for lawmakers when they've blown each of those deadlines.

Quinn changed that today in a big way.

(via Flickr/kcdsTM)

Updated 4;50 p.m. Reporting by Illinois Public Radio's Amanda Vinicky.

With a week to go before a deadline requiring Illinois allow people to carry guns in public, Governor Pat Quinn today vetoed the legislation Tuesday that would have authorized concealed carry. 

(See full veto statement below)

The governor claims he's concerned about public safety, but he's already under fire by critics who say it's a political stunt. The measure's sponsor has already filed paperwork to override Quinn's changes.

About Public Safety?

Gov. Quinn Signs New Fracking Regulations

Jun 17, 2013
(via Flickr/jglazer75)

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed legislation Monday giving the state the nation's strictest regulations for high-volume oil and gas drilling.

In a news release, Quinn says the law will "unlock the potential" for thousands of jobs in southern Illinois while protecting the environment. Quinn's signature was expected after the measure sailed through the Illinois Legislature.

(via Flickr/Of Small Things)

Updated at 11:50 a.m., Friday, June 7 & 3:14 p.m. 

The Illinois State Police on Friday issued a response to Gibbons' letter. The state police, along with the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police and the Illinois Sheriff's Association, say they will continue to enforce state law which prohibits the carrying of "an immediately accessible firearm on your person or in your vehicle regardless of whether it is concealed." Violating the law can result in an arrest.

Our original story:

www.danrutherford.org

Most of those running for governor in 2014 have already expressed their interest in the job. Only a few have made it official. Congressman Aaron Schock is not running for governor. State Treasurer Dan Rutherford is.

“I sense the citizens of Illinois are in depression and frustration with their government," Rutherford said at a Chicago event at the restaurant Harry Caray's downtown.

Rutherford toured the state Sunday as part of his announcement. 

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Update 4:50 p.m. with comments from Mo. Nat. Guard Maj. Tammy Spicer. Updated 2:43 with Missouri disaster declaration. Updated 9:56 a.m. April 19 with Missouri, St. Louis information. Updated at 4 p.m. April 18 with Ameren substation information.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has declared a state of emergency following significant flash and river flooding in his state.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn took his call for new state gun regulations to the church pulpit.

Quinn has been talking to church-goers about how to reduce gun violence in Chicago.

At Saint Sabina's Sunday on the city's South Side - Quinn invoked the Bible in talking about proposals like expanding background checks and banning certain guns.

"We're not going to stand by and let children and others be killed," Quinn said. "No no no. We're going to listen to what Paul said: Love is patient. Love is kind. Love never fails."

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn is defending his decision to reappoint the director of the state's prison system to a second two-year term.

Republicans have criticized Corrections Director S.A. "Tony" Godinez for prison overcrowding and understaffing. But Governor Quinn, a Democrat, says Godinez has done a good job leading the department.

"They understand the importance of public safety for everyone. For the prison guards, for the public, and for the inmates, and Tony understands that, and he's going forward," Quinn told reporters.

(via Flickr/jglazer75)

By a margin of 96-to-4, members of Illinois' largest public employees' union voted to ratify a new contract with the state.

AFSCME and Governor Pat Quinn's administration reached a deal in late February, but in order for it to take effect, a majority of the union's 35,000 members had to agree to it.

AFSCME spokesman Anders Lindall says the negotiations may have been the toughest the union has ever experienced.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

If Governor Pat Quinn's agreement with AFSCME, Illinois' largest public employee union, goes through, new employees will be treated differently than those already on the payroll. 

Union members get pay boosts the longer they work for the state. Quinn's Chief of Staff Jack Lavin, says it will take longer for new hires to reach those step increases, and he says they'll start off making less too. 

"To achieve the top of that job classification it was previously eight years, now it’ll be 11 years," said Lavin. "So new employees will start at a lower wage.”

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

One area of state government that's not facing cuts under Illinois's worst-ever budget is its support for passenger rail service.

Gov. Pat Quinn is seeking to increase spending on Amtrak service in the state by $12 million for the fiscal year beginning July 1.

The Bloomington Pantagraph reports  that the 46 percent increase would bring total spending to $38 million for routes from Chicago to St. Louis, Carbondale and Galesburg.

A 2008 federal law requires states to start picking up a larger part of the tab for rail service on routes shorter than 750 miles.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Ill. Governor Pat Quinn will present his budget address in Springfield on Wednesday.

The state is reported to have the worst-funded pension system in the country - and has about $97 billion in unfunded obligations.

"Obviously, our pension reform will be part of the address, the need for getting that done right and getting it done now," said Quinn.

Quinn has said the pensions are unsustainable and are taking money away from other key government services.

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