Paul Curtman

Richardson hugs his father, Mark Richardson, right after he was elected as speaker of the  Missouri House.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

House Speaker Todd Richardson’s legislative career is full of defied expectations.

Before he was elected to House leadership, Richardson helped bring substantial changes to Missouri’s embattled Second Injury Fund – an issue that bedeviled lawmakers for years. And after the misdeeds of his predecessor, the Poplar Bluff Republican rose to the speakership much earlier than anybody expected.

Paul Curtman
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On this week’s edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum welcome back state Rep. Paul Curtman to the program.

The Republican, from Union in Franklin County, first burst onto the scene in 2010, when he pulled off an upset against then-state Rep. Michael Frame, D-Eureka. Curtman’s victory was often spotlighted as a sign of strength for the “Tea Party” movement in Missouri, especially since the Marine Corps veteran gained notoriety in speaking out against President Barack Obama’s health-care law.

Flickr/Jeremy Noble

Missouri lawmakers are weighing what role bicycles should play in the future of transportation spending. 

A proposed constitutional amendment would raise the state sales tax by a penny to bridge any anticipated shortfalls over the next ten years. Most of the money would be for roads and bridges, but 10 percent could be earmarked by local governments for alternative forms of transportation including bicycle, air, rail, and pedestrian projects.

(Flickr Creative Commons User Andres Rueda)

The opportunity was too good to pass up. 

When Boeing decided to move production of its 777X passenger plane out of Seattle, states across the country were eager to offer their services. Missouri's political and business leaders were no exception.  They simply couldn't miss out on the chance to cement thousands of high-paying jobs for decades to come.

Jason Rosenbaum/St. Louis Public Radio

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio and The Beacon's Chris McDaniel joins Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics. 

State Rep. Paul Curtman, R-Pacific, is this week’s guest on the Politically Speaking podcast, which this week features regulars Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies as hosts. Chris McDaniel is on assignment.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - A special Missouri House committee charged with proposing ways to cut the size of state government has come up with several ideas that range from reducing the number of state-owned vehicles to granting more power to the state auditor.

But it’s unclear if any of those proposals will have much traction when state legislators reconvene in January – particularly since Gov. Jay Nixon’s administration challenges the panel’s contention that its suggestions might save the state money.

Mo. House Communications

The chair of a Missouri House committee looking at ways to downsize state government says they've handed off their findings to the Speaker's office.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee looking at ways to downsize state government wrapped up its three-day tour across the state with three meetings Thursday, in St. Joseph, Columbia, and at the State Capitol in Jefferson City.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: End state involvement in public education. Curb the state’s use of federal grants. Cut taxes to reduce state income. And legalize marijuana.

Those were among the most frequent suggestions posed Tuesday morning by many of the roughly 50 area residents – some of them state lawmakers -- who showed up in Clayton for the first in a series of hearings around the state this week by the Missouri House Committee on downsizing state government.

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

An interim committee kicked off its statewide tour in St. Louis County on Tuesday, gathering small business owners and other citizens to voice their ideas for ways to shrink Missouri's government.

The "Missouri House Committee on Downsizing State Government" is chaired by Rep. Paul Curtman (R-Franklin County).

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri lawmakers have proposed legislation aimed at preventing Missouri courts from applying laws from foreign countries and those based on Sharia, the Islamic religious law.