Paul McKee

Developer Paul McKee outlined his plans for an urgent care hospital at 25th St. and Maiden Ln. in July of 2014.
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

Developer Paul McKee unveiled plans Wednesday for an urgent care facility on the north side of St. Louis, but questions at the press event turned to the lack of infrastructure projects in McKee's massive, 1,500 acre redevelopment area.

(provided by Northside Regeneration)

A new urgent care hospital is planned within the Northside Regeneration project in north St. Louis.

Developer Paul McKee will announce plans Wednesday for the first big project within the 1,500-acre footprint of the redevelopment zone. Mayor Francis Slay, state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed and state Rep. Penny Hubbard are expected to attend.

Although nothing official has been released, people close to the project say the facility will likely be about 16,000 square feet.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Developer Paul McKee has two weeks to reimburse the city of St. Louis for legal fees associated with his Northside Regeneration project. 

The city’s Board of Estimate and Apportionment voted Wednesday to give McKee until April 30 to pay approximately $57,000 in legal fees. That money is associated with a roughly three-year legal battle over McKee's proposal to redevelop portions of north St. Louis.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Slowly but surely, developer Paul McKee’s plan to make over a large section of the city of St. Louis is again coming to fruition.

The legislation approved by the city’s Housing, Urban Development and Zoning committee today authorizes additional tax incentives for McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration Initiative, and restarts the development clock for the entire project.

The vote was delayed by a day after some members of the committee did not show up in order to deny a quorum.

(Maria Altman/St. Louis Public Radio)

Big political weight was behind two NorthSide Regeneration bills that went before a St. Louis aldermanic committee Tuesday morning, but no vote was taken after four aldermen failed to attend.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Legislative hearings get underway next week on the measures that could finally lead to the start of Paul McKee’s massive redevelopment project for north St. Louis.

A court case held up the $8.1 billion project for three years. The measures up for debate would give McKee access to an additional $192 million in tax assistance, and restart the project’s clock. Mayor Francis Slay and Congressman William Lacy Clay are both expected to speak in support at Tuesday's hearing. 

Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Beacon.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.  

(St. Louis Public Radio)

The St. Louis Tax Increment Financing Commission voted to activate the last two phases of the Northside Regeneration project Wednesday morning, which has more than $190 in TIF funding.

Six commissioners voted yes with one, Ken Hutchinson, abstaining.

It now will move to the Board of Aldermen where the Housing, Urban Development, and Zoning committee likely will hear it.

Paul McKee told the TIF Commission at the meeting he has two major industrial users interested in moving into the area bringing a total of 250 jobs.

"TIF helps recruit jobs," McKee said.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

An $8.1 billion plan to remake a big chunk of north St. Louis continues to face stiff opposition, four years after it was first made public.

More than 200 people, most of them opposed to the Northside Regeneration Initiative, packed the St. Louis city Tax Increment Financing Commission meeting today urging its members to spike the project completely.

(Mike Matney)

Legal questions surround the arrest of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing who was captured on Friday.

What is the role of the public safety exception as it relates to Miranda rights? Were civil rights violated as a result of the lockdown?  Should Tsarnaev be tried as an enemy combatant as some Republican legislators have suggested?

The questions surrounding the surviving suspect of the Boston Marathon bombing were discussed by a panel of legal experts, as part of our monthly legal roundtable discussion.

The panelists included:

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