Peter Kinder

Chris McDaniel, St. Louis Public Radio.

Every week, St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's episode: The results from the mayoral primary are in. Why did Reed lose? Did Slay win by as much as he had hoped? Then Jo shares some stories from Democrat Days and we close it out with Lt. Governor Peter Kinder's lawsuit.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A lawsuit has been filed in the Missouri Bootheel accusing the state of wrongfully requiring digital copies of vital records.

The plaintiff, Eric Griffin of Stoddard County, was seeking a conceal carry endorsement.  He says officials at his local license fee office told him that in order to receive it, his application, birth certificate and residency documents would have to be digitally scanned and stored by the Missouri Department of RevenueLt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) says any license fee office that makes that demand is breaking the law.

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Jan 24, 2013
Alex Heuer

Jason Rosenbaum is out this week, so we have St. Louis Public Radio's Marshall Griffin filling in. Marshall joins Jo Mannies of the St. Louis Beacon and Chris McDaniel of St. Louis Public Radio to discuss the week in politics.

On this week's show: the special elections bill that's speeding through the statehouse, the early morning voter ID committee and the $6 million plane.

Editor's note: after the recording, the voter ID committee was pushed back to 8 a.m.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

The Missouri House has given first-round approval to legislation that would require special elections to fill vacancies in statewide offices.

If passed, House Bill 110 would only allow the Governor to appoint a temporary placeholder who would not be eligible to run in the special election.  House Speaker Pro-tem Jason Smith (R, Salem), the bill’s sponsor, says it’s not a deliberate swipe at Democratic Governor Jay Nixon.

Emerson Resigns, Special Election Date Announced

Jan 22, 2013
(Office of Congresswoman Jo Ann Emerson)

Reporting by Jacob McClelland and Chris McDaniel.

Updated at 2:28 with announcement of the date of the special election.

As expected, U.S. Representative Jo Ann Emerson submitted her letter of resignation to Governor Jay Nixon and House speaker John Boehner on Tuesday. Emerson is leaving to become president and CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

Now, Nixon must call for a special election to fill out the remainder of Emerson’s term.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Legislation to require special elections in Missouri to fill vacancies in statewide offices has cleared another hurdle.

The bill today easily passed the House Rules Committee and is expected to be debated on the floor of the House next week.  If passed, House Bill 110 would only allow the governor to appoint a temporary placeholder if a statewide office is vacated, and that person would be ineligible to run in the special election to fill the vacancy.  State Representative Jeff Roorda (D, Barnhart) sits on the Rules Committee and cast one of the few “no” votes.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee has overwhelmingly passed legislation that would require special elections to fill vacancies in statewide offices.

House Bill 110 would require special elections if the office of Lt. Governor or any other statewide office is suddenly vacated.  It would allow the Governor to only appoint a placeholder who would temporarily fill the office but not be eligible to run in the special election.  It’s sponsored by House Speaker Pro-tem Jason Smith (R, Salem).

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri’s inauguration day has arrived, as Governor Jay Nixon (D) and several other state office holders prepare to be sworn in.

It’ll be the second term for most of those taking the oath of office, including Democrats Nixon, Attorney General Chris Koster, and State Treasurer Clint Zweifel.  Fellow Democrat Jason Kander, the incoming Secretary of State, will be the only statewide office newcomer.  Republican Lt. Governor Peter Kinder will be taking the oath of office for the third time, and his third term may prove to be very short if his bid to replace southeast Missouri Congresswoman Jo Ann Emerson (R) succeeds.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Aside from Medicaid expansion, the most talked-about issue so far during the just-begun Missouri legislative session is whether Governor Jay Nixon (D) has the authority to appoint a new Lt. Governor if Peter Kinder succeeds fellow Republican Jo Ann Emerson in Congress.

Following his annual Prayer Breakfast earlier today, Governor Nixon told reporters he believes he has the authority to appoint a new Lt. Governor if the office suddenly becomes vacant.

Ryan Famuliner/KBIA

Updated 4:30 p.m. with copy from KBIA's Ryan Famuliner.

A bipartisan group of Missouri leaders is trying to put pressure on Congress to address the national debt – and says tens of thousands of Missouri jobs are at stake.

The group, “Fix the Debt Missouri,” joins a larger national group of political and business leaders urging bipartisanship in Washington – as the so-called “fiscal cliff” looms. Former Republican US Senator Kit Bond is one of the chairs of the Missouri chapter of the group, which announced its formation at the Missouri Capitol today.

(via Flickr/KOMUnews)

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder is urging state lawmakers to not create a health insurance exchange or expand Medicaid when they convene for their regular session next year.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Peter Kinder has won a third term as Missouri's Lt. Governor.

The Cape Girardeau Republican fended off a challenge from former State Auditor, Democrat Susan Montee.  She called Kinder shortly before 11:00 p.m. to concede the race and congratulate Kinder.  He celebrated his victory with a small gathering of supporters, about 30 in all, at a hotel in Creve Cour. He credits what he calls "grass-roots" campaigning for his victory this time around.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder has lost another round in his battle against President Obama’s federal health care law.

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday that the Republican Lt. Governor has no legal standing to file suit because the Affordable Care Act poses no immediate threat to Kinder’s legally protected interests.  He filed suit two years ago as an individual, not in his official capacity as Lt. Governor.  The three-judge panel’s ruling did not address the constitutionality of the federal health care law, most of which was upheld last year in a 5-4 ruling by the U-S Supreme Court.

Montee stumps at Democratic rally

Sep 17, 2012
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The race for Missouri Lieutenant Governor has remained below the radar so far this political season. Republican incumbent Peter Kinder and Democratic challenger Susan Montee are well-known political names in the state, but their campaigning has been fairly low-key to this point.

Montee appeared as part of a Democratic rally Sunday in mid-Missouri, in front of a full crowd of 300 Democrats.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) is criticizing Governor Jay Nixon’s (D) administration for not taking part in a disaster recovery hearing Tuesday at the State Capitol.

A House interim committee appointed to examine the state’s response to last year’s flooding and tornadoes held what was supposed to be its final hearing – but it ended early when no one from the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) or the Department of Public Safety showed up.  Kinder, who chairs the committee, says they will now send a letter to the Nixon Administration asking for written testimony.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

There will be no challenge to the new language inserted onto a ballot initiative by a Cole County judge regarding health insurance exchanges.

The version initially approved by Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) had asked if state law should, “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care,” unless the people or the legislature created an exchange.  In a statement, Carnahan says Attorney General Chris Koster (D) refused to file an appeal on her office’s behalf.  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) filed suit against Carnahan over that language.  He applauded the Democratic Attorney General’s move.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

Updated 4:15 p.m. Thursday: Carnahan will not appeal Judge Green's new language, saying Attorney General Chris Koster refused a request for further legal action, and the Secretary of  State's office is not in a position to appeal on its own.  A full version of today's developments can be found here.

Our original story:

The language used in a ballot initiative approved by Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) has been tossed out by a Cole County judge.

Proposition E centers on the conditions for creating a health care exchange in Missouri; the language authorized by Carnahan read in part whether the law should “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care.”  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) called the language used by the Secretary of State unbelievably biased.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

(Update:  Judge Daniel Green ruled in favor of Lt. Gov. Kinder and changed the ballot language initially approved by Sec. of State updated version of this story can be found here.)

A Cole County judge heard arguments today in a lawsuit that claims Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) deliberately used misleading language in a ballot initiative regarding the creation of a health insurance exchange.

The language in question asks in part if the law should “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care.”  Attorney Jay Kanzler represents Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) and a group of Republican legislative leaders who filed suit.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

A Cole County judge heard arguments Friday on whether to issue a temporary restraining order against Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D).

Carnahan and Republican leaders are sparring over the language used in a ballot initiative regarding health care exchanges.  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder and GOP lawmakers accuse Carnahan of using misleading language in order to influence voters to defeat the ballot question in November.  Attorney Jay Kanzler represents the plaintiffs.

“Secretary of State Carnahan's language talking about denying families and individuals access to affordable health care frankly doesn’t even come close to describing, in fact, what the ballot initiative would do,” Kanzler said.

(File photos/official photos/Facebook)

Among the races for Missouri’s statewide offices, the one with the most mudslinging so far is the Republican primary for Lt. Governor.  Peter Kinder is seeking re-election, but he’s facing a major challenge from State Senator Brad Lager.  Both are touting conservative ideals while attacking each other’s records in office. 

St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at next week’s GOP Lt. Governor’s contest.