Peter Kinder

Ryan Famuliner/KBIA

Updated 4:30 p.m. with copy from KBIA's Ryan Famuliner.

A bipartisan group of Missouri leaders is trying to put pressure on Congress to address the national debt – and says tens of thousands of Missouri jobs are at stake.

The group, “Fix the Debt Missouri,” joins a larger national group of political and business leaders urging bipartisanship in Washington – as the so-called “fiscal cliff” looms. Former Republican US Senator Kit Bond is one of the chairs of the Missouri chapter of the group, which announced its formation at the Missouri Capitol today.

(via Flickr/KOMUnews)

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder is urging state lawmakers to not create a health insurance exchange or expand Medicaid when they convene for their regular session next year.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Peter Kinder has won a third term as Missouri's Lt. Governor.

The Cape Girardeau Republican fended off a challenge from former State Auditor, Democrat Susan Montee.  She called Kinder shortly before 11:00 p.m. to concede the race and congratulate Kinder.  He celebrated his victory with a small gathering of supporters, about 30 in all, at a hotel in Creve Cour. He credits what he calls "grass-roots" campaigning for his victory this time around.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder has lost another round in his battle against President Obama’s federal health care law.

The 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Thursday that the Republican Lt. Governor has no legal standing to file suit because the Affordable Care Act poses no immediate threat to Kinder’s legally protected interests.  He filed suit two years ago as an individual, not in his official capacity as Lt. Governor.  The three-judge panel’s ruling did not address the constitutionality of the federal health care law, most of which was upheld last year in a 5-4 ruling by the U-S Supreme Court.

Montee stumps at Democratic rally

Sep 17, 2012
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The race for Missouri Lieutenant Governor has remained below the radar so far this political season. Republican incumbent Peter Kinder and Democratic challenger Susan Montee are well-known political names in the state, but their campaigning has been fairly low-key to this point.

Montee appeared as part of a Democratic rally Sunday in mid-Missouri, in front of a full crowd of 300 Democrats.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) is criticizing Governor Jay Nixon’s (D) administration for not taking part in a disaster recovery hearing Tuesday at the State Capitol.

A House interim committee appointed to examine the state’s response to last year’s flooding and tornadoes held what was supposed to be its final hearing – but it ended early when no one from the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) or the Department of Public Safety showed up.  Kinder, who chairs the committee, says they will now send a letter to the Nixon Administration asking for written testimony.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

There will be no challenge to the new language inserted onto a ballot initiative by a Cole County judge regarding health insurance exchanges.

The version initially approved by Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) had asked if state law should, “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care,” unless the people or the legislature created an exchange.  In a statement, Carnahan says Attorney General Chris Koster (D) refused to file an appeal on her office’s behalf.  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) filed suit against Carnahan over that language.  He applauded the Democratic Attorney General’s move.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

Updated 4:15 p.m. Thursday: Carnahan will not appeal Judge Green's new language, saying Attorney General Chris Koster refused a request for further legal action, and the Secretary of  State's office is not in a position to appeal on its own.  A full version of today's developments can be found here.

Our original story:

The language used in a ballot initiative approved by Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) has been tossed out by a Cole County judge.

Proposition E centers on the conditions for creating a health care exchange in Missouri; the language authorized by Carnahan read in part whether the law should “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care.”  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) called the language used by the Secretary of State unbelievably biased.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

(Update:  Judge Daniel Green ruled in favor of Lt. Gov. Kinder and changed the ballot language initially approved by Sec. of State Carnahan...an updated version of this story can be found here.)

A Cole County judge heard arguments today in a lawsuit that claims Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) deliberately used misleading language in a ballot initiative regarding the creation of a health insurance exchange.

The language in question asks in part if the law should “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care.”  Attorney Jay Kanzler represents Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) and a group of Republican legislative leaders who filed suit.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

A Cole County judge heard arguments Friday on whether to issue a temporary restraining order against Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D).

Carnahan and Republican leaders are sparring over the language used in a ballot initiative regarding health care exchanges.  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder and GOP lawmakers accuse Carnahan of using misleading language in order to influence voters to defeat the ballot question in November.  Attorney Jay Kanzler represents the plaintiffs.

“Secretary of State Carnahan's language talking about denying families and individuals access to affordable health care frankly doesn’t even come close to describing, in fact, what the ballot initiative would do,” Kanzler said.

(File photos/official photos/Facebook)

Among the races for Missouri’s statewide offices, the one with the most mudslinging so far is the Republican primary for Lt. Governor.  Peter Kinder is seeking re-election, but he’s facing a major challenge from State Senator Brad Lager.  Both are touting conservative ideals while attacking each other’s records in office. 

St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at next week’s GOP Lt. Governor’s contest.

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Lieutenant Governor Peter Kinder is asking the State Emergency Management Agency to explain why the St. Louis suburb of Bridgeton has not received $500,000 in FEMA funds to help it recover from the 2011 Good Friday tornado.

Kinder chairs an interim legislative committee on disaster preparedness, response and recovery, which agreed today to give SEMA 48 hours to respond.  

(via Flickr/KOMUnews)

Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder's campaign says he will pay a penalty for missing a tax bill on property he owns in Cape Girardeau.

Property tax records show Kinder owes $192 of taxes plus $42 of penalties and interest for the 2011 tax year. Campaign manager Logan Thompson said Kinder had been unaware of the bill but would pay it Monday.

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) and GOP legislative leaders have filed a lawsuit against Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) over the language used in a ballot initiative regarding health care exchanges.

The language approved by Carnahan asks if the law should be amended to, “deny individuals, families, and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care plans through a state-based health benefit exchange unless authorized by statute, initiative or referendum.”  Kinder says the language skews the ballot question’s true purpose, to bar the governor from creating an exchange by executive order.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Elana Gordon of KCUR reported for this story.

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder is once again filing suit against a health care measure. He and some other Republican lawmakers have announced plans to challenge the secretary of state’s office on newly issued ballot language for a health care measure that’s slated to appear on the November ballot.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Candidates for the U.S. Senate, Congress, Missouri General Assembly, Governor  and other statewide offices can now file to run.

Hundreds flocked to Jefferson City today and lined up outside the doors of the Secretary of State’s office to file their paperwork. Among those filing on the first day was Republican Peter Kinder, who’s seeking a third term as Lt. Governor.  Kinder had originally planned to challenge incumbent Democrat Jay Nixon for Governor, but changed his mind last fall.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and other local leaders are endorsing Susan Montee in her campaign for Lieutenant Governor. None of the four Democrats in the race for the office are from St. Louis -- Missouri's largest voting bloc. Thus, Montee's endorsement from St. Louis city officials gives her a strong lead as she seeks the nomination.

Montee, the former state auditor, kicked off her campaign at St. Louis City Hall Tuesday saying she knows how to fight for veterans and seniors.

(website of Sen. Ridgeway)

Updated at 2 p.m. with information about potential third Democratic candidate.

The Republican primary for lieutenant governor of Missouri may get even more crowded.

State Sen. Luann Ridgeway, a Republican from the Kansas City area, said Monday she is "very committed" to the race, though she has not officially declared her candidacy.

(UPI/Rick Meyer)

Missouri's housing agency has rejected a proposal to bypass new federal wage standards for tornado recovery projects.

A Missouri Housing Development Commission recovery plan requires workers on state-subsidized projects to be paid the prevailing federal wage used on federally funded public works projects. Those wages rose substantially in September.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

All statewide officeholders in Missouri would be limited to eight years in office, under legislation pre-filed in the State Senate.

The Governor and State Treasurer are the only statewide office holders in Missouri limited to two four-year terms.  The rest – Lt. GovernorAttorney GeneralSecretary of State and State Auditor – can run for re-election as often as they want.  The measure is sponsored by State Senator Brad Lager (R, Savannah), who is also running for Lt. Governor.

(Official Photo via Office of the Lt. Governor)

Updated at 5:35 p.m. via the Associated Press, and at 5:42 with a quote from Brad Lager:

In a ripple effect from Kinder's announcement, St. Louis developer Chris McKee, who just announced his candidacy on Monday, has now announced that he is pulling out of the race for Lt. Gov. and instead will throw his support behind Kinder.

Republican state Sen. Brad Lager, of Savannah, also declared his candidacy for lieutenant governor Monday. Lager said Friday that he is still in the race but will re-evaluate that decision after he gets a chance to talk with Kinder.

(via flickr/D.H. Parks)

A political observer says Republicans in Missouri may have already blown their chances to win state-level statewide offices next year.

The Secretary of State’s race is the only one with any major GOP contenders (State Senators Scott Rupp and Bill Stouffer, and House Speaker Pro-tem Shane Schoeller), following Steven Tilley’s departure from the Lt. Governor’s race.  Current Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) still hasn’t announced whether he’s running for governor.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

(Click on the link to hear Marshall Griffin's exclusive interview with Tilley)

The only major Republican contender in the Missouri Lt. Governor’s race has dropped out.

Steven Tilley of Perryville made the surprise announcement today (Thursday) to fellow House Republicans and to the media.  He says he made the decision after realizing that he wants to be a normal person again.

“It wasn’t in my heart to do it, I just didn’t have the fire in the belly," Tilley said.  "I started out because I wanted to do it, but I’ve sacrificed a lot to myself financially and to my family, and I’m comfortable…it’s a load off my shoulders and I’m excited to move into a new chapter.”

St. Louis Public Radio

Election Day 2012 is just under a year away, and there’s still no major Republican challenger to Democrat Jay Nixon in next year’s Missouri Governor’s race.

GOP Lt. Governor Peter Kinder still has not announced his intentions, despite raising over a million dollars for a potential gubernatorial run.  Dave Robertson is a political science professor at the University of Missouri – St. Louis.  He says allegations about Kinder’s past visits to a strip club may have harmed his ability to financially keep pace with Nixon.

Joel Finbloom

Cardinals win 18th pennant

The St. Louis Cardinals are the National League champions following an outstanding offensive display in Milwaukee last night.

David Freese belted one of the Cardinals' three home runs while going 3-for-4 with three runs scored in a 12-6 rout of the Brewers in Game 6 of the NLCS. Freese smacked a three-run shot to put the Cardinals ahead 4-0 in the first inning. Rafael Furcal launched a solo blast in the second and Albert Pujols did the same in the third. Pujols and pinch-hitter Allen Craig each finished with two RBIs.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

Mo. Lt. Gov, Peter Kinder wants the Missouri Development Finance Board to review the way it approves financing for economic development projects. The request comes in the wake of the Mamtek fiasco in Moberly.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri State Auditor Tom Schweich (R) has released audits today of the Missouri Division of Tourism and of the former State Water Patrol.

First, one audit concludes that Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) may have had a conflict of interest by serving as chairman of both the state Tourism Commission and a nonprofit group that put on the Tour of Missouri bicycle race.

It notes that the Tourism Commission has no conflict of interest policy and recommends it adopt one.

(Official Photo via Office of the Lt. Governor)

Republican Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder plans to meet with residents across Missouri before deciding whether to challenge Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon in next year's elections.

Although he has not officially declared his candidacy, Kinder has been preparing for months to run for governor.

But his potential campaign was dealt a setback earlier this month when Kinder acknowledged that he had repeatedly visited a strip club 17 years ago.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

A federal appeals court will hear arguments this fall on a lawsuit by Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder challenging the new federal health care law.

Kinder filed suit as a private individual challenging the federal law on several points. A federal judge dismissed the lawsuit in April, ruling that Kinder did not have legal standing to bring many of the claims and that others were not ripe for judicial review.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

As we told you about Wednesday, the St. Louis Riverfront Times published an interview with Tammy Chapman, who worked as a stripper in the St. Louis area in the 90’s and claimed that then-State Senator, and now Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder, was “one of her best customers.”

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