Photography

Oscar C. Kuehn / Missouri History Museum

To mark the 100th anniversary of St. Louis’ incorporation as a city, an imposing array of “gasbags” assembled at the edge of Forest Park in 1909 for the St. Louis Centennial balloon race.

(A bunch of politicians were there, too.)

Photos provided by the Sheldon Art Galleries

The St. Louis area is crawling with photographic opportunities. Local professional Ryan Archer took advantage of one of them to win Best in Show in the Sheldon’s “The City at 250” photo contest.

Archer’s “City Museum Climbers,” entered in the “Events and People” category, garnered him $1,000 and a place in “The City at 250” exhibit, opening June 6. The competition was a collaborative effort of The Sheldon and the St. Louis Beacon, now St. Louis Public Radio. The Beacon merged in December with St. Louis Public Radio and is no longer a separate entity.

Finding Vivian Maier
movie Facebook page

Finding Vivian Maier,” a documentary opening Feb. 25 at the Plaza Frontenac Cinema, tells the story of a woman who worked as a nanny in New York and Chicago. She also took thousands of photographs that were never published and only discovered fairly recently.

Her story piqued the interest of the art world. The quality of her work has sustained it.

Dan Younger

On display now at the Sheldon Art Galleries is “Dan Younger: Travel Places,” a collection of photographs by University of Missouri-St. Louis Art Professor Dan Younger.  

The photographs were taken at U.S. tourist destinations over the span of ten years, the result of Younger’s habit of carrying two cameras – one for his family and one for art. Taken in public spaces, they fall under the category of “street photography.”

Courtesy of Poetry Scores

Poetry Scores, an organization translating poems into different media, is asking St. Louisans to picture themselves through the lines of a Greek psychoanalyst.

On the Metrolink, in bars and even at funerals, cell-phone photographers are capturing selfies -- self-portraits -- usually bound for Facebook, Instagram and other social media. But now, they now have a more poetic destination.

(John Nagel/IPHF)

The International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum has a new home in St. Louis.

This Friday it will celebrate its grand opening in Grand Center at 3415 Olive Street.

Provided by Jeff Phillips

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Carol Felzien remembers them -- her Great Aunt Edna and her Great Uncle Harry Grossmann.

Uncle Harry was her grandfather’s brother. Together, they owned Grossmann Contracting Co. Uncle Harry and Aunt Edna lived in Frontenac. He was a Mason. She belonged to the Order of the Eastern Star.

As a new season of Major League Baseball begins, one photographer focuses on baseballs past — that is, baseballs that have lain dormant well after their last pitch.

For years, photographer Don Hamerman walked his dog near an old baseball diamond in Stamford, Conn. And in all different seasons, in all kinds of weather, Hamerman picked up old baseballs.

He brought them back to his studio, where they sat around for years until he finally decided to start photographing them in 2005.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: If you've recently found yourself lost in the St. Louis Art Museum, you are forgiven. So much has changed in the old Cass Gilbert building that almost all once familiar galleries are now full of surprises, with the airing of paintings, sculptures, installations and decorative arts that were hiding in storage.

(via Twitter/Photo by Chris Hadfield)

Here's a view you don't get every day:

It was tweeted in January by the commander of the International Space Station, Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield. He's been making it his job to not only lead Expedition 35 of the ISS but also amass a dazzling collection of images of the Earth from space.

(Here's a full map of his images taken high above locations all over the world)

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum (IPHF) collection has arrived in St. Louis, after carefully traveling 500 miles in five moving trucks, toward the goal of an August opening.

If the experience were tallied up in a MasterCard commercial, it might sound like this: Transporting 30,000 images and 6,000 cameras from Oklahoma City: $25,000. Having them on display year-round in Grand Center: Priceless.

St. Louisans and other visitors can visit roomfuls of transformative photographs at the new IPHF in Grand Center, including Edward Steichen’s “Garbo,” Margaret Bourke-White’s “Fort Peck Dam” and Dorothea Lange's “Migrant Mother.”

(NASA/Suomi NPP)

The images of this past week's heavy snowfall in Missouri and across the Midwest are familiar and chaotic - cars in ditches, closed airports and overall gridlock of infrastructure.

Today's NASA "Image of the Day" provides a decidedly more peaceful look at the storm's effects, from space.

Here's how NASA describes this image and the technology they used to capture it:

National Geographic Photo Contest Winners

Jan 7, 2013

National Geographic last week announced the winners in its annual photo contest. According to the contest website, they received more than 22,000 entries from amateur and professional photographers around the world.

Here's a selection of the winning images, including editors' picks, viewers' choice and honorable mentions. You can see the rest on their website.

Consider the stuff of our everyday lives — the clothes, the sheets, the toys and games. It's essential for a time, but inevitably, eventually, it all gets trashed — or donated.

And that donation process can seem a bit like magic. We drop off our used stuff, and the items disappear — or so we think.

But what truly becomes of it? Where does it go? And what does it look like?

Found Photos Of The Rolling Stones: Who Took Them?

Oct 16, 2012

On a recent afternoon at an estate sale outside Los Angeles, Lauren White found about 40 photos of the Rolling Stones taken during their American tour of 1965 — completely unclaimed in an unmarked box.

(courtesy Photo Flood Saint Louis)

Photo Flood Saint Louis describes themselves as a "a collective of photographers, living in the area, who occasionally invade parts of town to record it in a surge of imagery" and "create a photographic map of St. Louis" in the process.

St. Louis Public Radio has partnered with Photo Flood to celebrate our area through these "surges," and show you the work resulting from each.

Today's blog post showcases the second meeting of the collective and their flood of Bellefontaine Cemetery.

Bringing Springfield's Photos Back To Life

Sep 26, 2012

The first photography staff at the Illinois State Journal carried heavy, clumsy and slow Speed Graphic cameras. They shot on glass plates, and only had a few precious exposures to use throughout their day.

NPR's Claire O'Neill takes a forward-thinking approach to historical photographs. See for yourself via the link.

Found photos: The 1930s in full color

Sep 14, 2012

Not just the '30s — also the three decades that followed. But let's not spoil the fun. Basically: Go here to experience a special interactive about the amazing found photos of Charles W. Cushman. You won't regret it!

Then come back and leave your comments below — or on Twitter: #nprcushman

A new species discovered ... on Flickr

Aug 13, 2012

One day in May of 2011, Shaun Winterton was looking at pictures of bugs on the Internet when something unusual caught his eye.

It was a close shot of a green lacewing — an insect he knew well — but on its wing was an unfamiliar network of black lines and a few flecks of blue.

Winterton, a senior entomologist at the California Department of Food and Agriculture, has seen a lot of bugs. But he hadn't seen this species before.

On January 18, 2011, the very last batches of Kodachrome film were processed at Dwayne's Photo Lab in Parsons, Kansas. Webster University students and faculty were there to witness that last run, which included 100 rolls of their own.  

(Véronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

More than a million Americans are living with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. About a quarter of them are women, and in St. Louis and throughout the country, African-American women are disproportionately affected.

An HIV diagnosis can lead not just to debilitating medical problems, but to social stigma and isolation. But as St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra reports, a photography project is giving some HIV-positive women a new way to look at their disease and its challenges.

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