photography

Chris Renteria's portrait of an Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper assigned to protest detail re: Ferguson
Courtesy of Chris Renteria

This Friday the Kranzberg Arts Center opens a photo show challenging popular media representations of events in Ferguson. The photographers focused the lives of Ferguson residents, details, portraiture, and children instead of just conflict. Participating photographer Chris Renteria, 40, saw unity where many see division.

“Whether I looked through my lens and saw a police officer in riot gear holding an assault rifle, or a 2-year-old in his mom’s arms as she’s fist-raised and chanting - in each person there’s humanity,” said Renteria.

Via Cinema St. Louis

Flipping through the nation’s family album, what’s missing? That question led director Thomas Allen Harris to create “Through a Lens Darkly: Black Photographers and the Emergence of a People,” a film that examines how photography shaped the identity and perceptions of blacks in America.

“In some ways, it is a history lesson, although it’s kind of a different take on history because we have a lot of contemporary artists in the film,” Harris told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday. “In many ways, as they do this, they reshape the way in which we view history.”

Photo Flood Photographer Jeni Kulka's September 20th Image in Tower Grove Park
Photo Flood Photographer Jeni Kulka

Late one sunny afternoon in late September eight photographers gathered at the Grand Avenue entrance to Tower Grove Park. For roughly 15 minutes the photographers chatted about gear, the quality of sunlight slipping through the leaves, and the stories behind some of their favorite photographs before slipping out into the park to document their surroundings.

Nic Tullis

The Sheldon has its own way of celebrating St. Louis’ birthday. Its new exhibit "The City at 250: A Celebration of St. Louis in Photographs" stemmed from a city-wide photo contest the Sheldon launched with the Beacon (now part of St. Louis Public Radio) that received over 500 entries. Focusing on photos of the city as it is today, the exhibit is a companion to the Sheldon's “Imagining the Founding of St. Louis.” Together, they offer a then and now view for the city’s 250th celebration.

Courtesy PHD Gallery

Updated following "Cityscape"

A couple of months ago, PHD Gallery owner Philip Hitchcock hesitated before pressing “Send” for his mass email soliciting selfies for an art exhibit.

“What if I do this big launch and the returns come back low?” Hitchcock said. “I was really, really nervous about it.”

But once he got a handful of “yes” responses, he figured he could use them as leverage.

“I could say, for instance, to Philip Slein, ‘Hey, Duane and Bruno are doing it, and Leslie Laskey and Roseann Weiss,'" Hitchcock said. "And it started to get legs.”

Oscar C. Kuehn / Missouri History Museum

To mark the 100th anniversary of St. Louis’ incorporation as a city, an imposing array of “gasbags” assembled at the edge of Forest Park in 1909 for the St. Louis Centennial balloon race.

(A bunch of politicians were there, too.)

Photos provided by the Sheldon Art Galleries

The St. Louis area is crawling with photographic opportunities. Local professional Ryan Archer took advantage of one of them to win Best in Show in the Sheldon’s “The City at 250” photo contest.

Archer’s “City Museum Climbers,” entered in the “Events and People” category, garnered him $1,000 and a place in “The City at 250” exhibit, opening June 6. The competition was a collaborative effort of The Sheldon and the St. Louis Beacon, now St. Louis Public Radio. The Beacon merged in December with St. Louis Public Radio and is no longer a separate entity.

Finding Vivian Maier
movie Facebook page

Finding Vivian Maier,” a documentary opening Feb. 25 at the Plaza Frontenac Cinema, tells the story of a woman who worked as a nanny in New York and Chicago. She also took thousands of photographs that were never published and only discovered fairly recently.

Her story piqued the interest of the art world. The quality of her work has sustained it.

Dan Younger

On display now at the Sheldon Art Galleries is “Dan Younger: Travel Places,” a collection of photographs by University of Missouri-St. Louis Art Professor Dan Younger.  

The photographs were taken at U.S. tourist destinations over the span of ten years, the result of Younger’s habit of carrying two cameras – one for his family and one for art. Taken in public spaces, they fall under the category of “street photography.”

Courtesy of Poetry Scores

Poetry Scores, an organization translating poems into different media, is asking St. Louisans to picture themselves through the lines of a Greek psychoanalyst.

On the Metrolink, in bars and even at funerals, cell-phone photographers are capturing selfies -- self-portraits -- usually bound for Facebook, Instagram and other social media. But now, they now have a more poetic destination.

(John Nagel/IPHF)

The International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum has a new home in St. Louis.

This Friday it will celebrate its grand opening in Grand Center at 3415 Olive Street.

As a new season of Major League Baseball begins, one photographer focuses on baseballs past — that is, baseballs that have lain dormant well after their last pitch.

For years, photographer Don Hamerman walked his dog near an old baseball diamond in Stamford, Conn. And in all different seasons, in all kinds of weather, Hamerman picked up old baseballs.

He brought them back to his studio, where they sat around for years until he finally decided to start photographing them in 2005.

(via Twitter/Photo by Chris Hadfield)

Here's a view you don't get every day:

It was tweeted in January by the commander of the International Space Station, Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield. He's been making it his job to not only lead Expedition 35 of the ISS but also amass a dazzling collection of images of the Earth from space.

(Here's a full map of his images taken high above locations all over the world)

(NASA/Suomi NPP)

The images of this past week's heavy snowfall in Missouri and across the Midwest are familiar and chaotic - cars in ditches, closed airports and overall gridlock of infrastructure.

Today's NASA "Image of the Day" provides a decidedly more peaceful look at the storm's effects, from space.

Here's how NASA describes this image and the technology they used to capture it:

National Geographic Photo Contest Winners

Jan 7, 2013

National Geographic last week announced the winners in its annual photo contest. According to the contest website, they received more than 22,000 entries from amateur and professional photographers around the world.

Here's a selection of the winning images, including editors' picks, viewers' choice and honorable mentions. You can see the rest on their website.

Consider the stuff of our everyday lives — the clothes, the sheets, the toys and games. It's essential for a time, but inevitably, eventually, it all gets trashed — or donated.

And that donation process can seem a bit like magic. We drop off our used stuff, and the items disappear — or so we think.

But what truly becomes of it? Where does it go? And what does it look like?

Found Photos Of The Rolling Stones: Who Took Them?

Oct 16, 2012

On a recent afternoon at an estate sale outside Los Angeles, Lauren White found about 40 photos of the Rolling Stones taken during their American tour of 1965 — completely unclaimed in an unmarked box.

(courtesy Photo Flood Saint Louis)

Photo Flood Saint Louis describes themselves as a "a collective of photographers, living in the area, who occasionally invade parts of town to record it in a surge of imagery" and "create a photographic map of St. Louis" in the process.

St. Louis Public Radio has partnered with Photo Flood to celebrate our area through these "surges," and show you the work resulting from each.

Today's blog post showcases the second meeting of the collective and their flood of Bellefontaine Cemetery.

Bringing Springfield's Photos Back To Life

Sep 26, 2012

The first photography staff at the Illinois State Journal carried heavy, clumsy and slow Speed Graphic cameras. They shot on glass plates, and only had a few precious exposures to use throughout their day.

NPR's Claire O'Neill takes a forward-thinking approach to historical photographs. See for yourself via the link.

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