(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

Corey Allen, the assistant police chief in the small Metro East community of Centreville, has been indicted by a grand jury for making false statements to federal agents.

U.S. Attorney Stephen Wigginton says a federal grand jury found that Allen, 31, lied when he told investigators that he had not sold a gun to a convicted felon. The indictment alleges that Allen sold the felon, who has not been named, the gun in May, 2012.


The Supreme Court has rejected an Illinois prosecutor's plea to allow enforcement of a law aimed at stopping people from recording police officers on the job.

The justices on Monday left in place a lower court ruling that found that the state's anti-eavesdropping law violates free speech rights when used against people who tape law enforcement officers. The law sets out a maximum prison term of 15 years.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

St. Louis County started construction on a new crime lab this afternoon and police say the facility will speed up processing time.

Department spokesman, Randy Vaughn, says the extra space will also give them the room they need for additional technicians to help take on a backlog of evidence.  

“This is also going to allow a separation of all the different types of forensics, chemistry, biology, our evidence custodians, our firearm custodians,” Vaughn says.  “That is going to make a vast difference in making sure we don’t have any type of contamination issues.”

(Flickr Creative Commons User essygie)

A former East St. Louis police officer who stole a Rolex watch planted by federal agents as a test has been sentenced to 66 days in prison.

Larry Greenlee, of Belleville, pleaded guilty in May to stealing the watch, which agents planted as part of an integrity test. Greenlee came across the Rolex, encircled with diamonds, in what he thought was a stolen car, which agents had bugged with recording devices.

The sentence was announced Friday by the U.S. Attorney's Office in southern Illinois.

(via Flickr/Be.Futureproof)

Now, no one in Illinois can stop firefighters or police officers from collecting charitable donations on roads - even if they wanted to.

Under a new Illinois law, public safety officials can't be denied permits to collect money for charities from drivers along roadsides. Gov. Pat Quinn signed the law Friday and it takes effect immediately.

The governor's office says Illinois is the sixth state to adopt such a law. The others are Florida, Nebraska, Texas, California and North Carolina.

(Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio)

East St. Louis nightclubs and other local businesses are bankrolling extra weekend police patrols after a series of violent crimes.

Mayor Alvin Parks Jr. says the city needs more officers on the street but cannot afford them on its own.

“This is taking already existing officers and paying them to work this special detail," Parks said. "A detail that will be about six officers downtown and another two in the rest of the city where there might be late night activity.”

(via Flickr/kev_hickey_uk)

Updated at 1:55 to correct spelling of judge's name.

A second judge in Illinois has struck down a state law that requires all parties to consent before a conversation can be recorded.

The law in question makes it a felony to record without everyone's permission. Even recording public officials in public places can be illegal.

Cook County Judge Stanley Sacks ruled today that the law was unconstitutional because it could criminalize "wholly innocent conduct."

Joseph Leahy/SLPRnews

Police budget cuts 50 officers through attrition

St. Louis Police Chief Dan Isom's budget proposal calls for cutting 50 officers through attrition, not layoffs. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Isom presented the budget Wednesday to the Board of Police Commissioners.

The department is faced with a $3.8 million shortfall. The city allocated $168 million to the department - a 3 percent increase over last year. But pension costs came in $5 million higher than anticipated.


Parkway School District to cut spending

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Parkway School Board has approved cutting spending by about $7.5 million to $9.6 million during the next two school years. The school board approved the cuts Wednesday night.

Reductions include eliminating 20 positions from administration and support staff, mostly through attrition.

(via Flickr/smays)

The Illinois Supreme Court has ruled that police must preserve video evidence in all cases, even misdemenors.

The court upheld sanctions today in a case where police erased video of a drunken driving arrest. The defendant told prosecutors she intended to fight the charges and wanted the video, but police still followed their policy of destroying videos after 30 days.

(photo courtesy of the Peoria (Ill.) police department)

This fall, the St. Louis police department will be getting help conducting surveillance on problem properties from an armadillo.

No, not the hard-shelled mammals you see scattered on highways in the Southwest.

This Armadillo is a former armored car that's been made bulletproof, given a graffiti-resistant paint job, and outfitted with 360-degree surveillance.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

A 28-year-old man is in critical condition after an exchange of gunfire with a suburban St. Louis police officer.

Meanwhile, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Friday that the suspect, Carlos Johnson of Ferguson, is charged with first-degree assault on a law enforcement officer. Johnson did not yet have an attorney.

(Julie Bierach/St. Louis Public Radio)

Federal and local officials are worried about the number of law enforcement officers killed so far this year. Yesterday, St. Louis Public Radio’s Julie Bierach looked at the scope of the problem.

Today, she explores what St. Louis area police do to stay safe on the streets and how they’re trying to build better relationships with the people they serve.

(UPI/Shane T. McCoy / US Marshals)

It’s been a bloody year for cops around the country. Already, dozens have been killed in the line of duty. In St. Louis, two law enforcement officers have been killed. Some in the criminal justice field say assaults against police officers are high in St. Louis and they worry that attitudes against police here are getting worse.

In the first of a two-part series, St. Louis Public Radio’s Julie Bierach explores the dangers police officers face today and spoke with some people living in higher crime neighborhoods about how they feel about their police.

(via Flickr/davidsonscott15)

Black motorists were more likely than others to be stopped by Missouri police last year.

An annual report released Wednesday by the attorney general found that black drivers were 69 percent more likely than white motorists to be pulled over in 2010.

(via Flickr/steakpinball)

A former police officer in the St. Louis suburb of Bridgeton faces sentencing in July after pleading guilty to taking a $5,000 bribe.

The U.S. Attorney's office in St. Louis says 38-year-old Scott William Haenel of O'Fallon also admitted obstructing a federal investigation in his guilty plea on Wednesday.

Federal authorities say a person cooperating with the FBI met several times with Haenel between November and January and paid him $5,000. In exchange, Haenel agreed to help conceal a money laundering scheme involving drug trafficking money.

Bill Raack, St. Louis Public Radio

The use of heroin in the St. Louis area is at epidemic levels, according to law enforcement officials.

The number of heroin overdoses and deaths has doubled in the St. Louis County and city over the past four years. St. Louis County Chief of Police Tim Fitch said the drug is cheaper now and it can be snorted or smoked, instead of injected. He said it's no longer just an urban issue.

(St. Louis Public Radio)

The battle over who will control the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department has entered the theater of the courtroom.

Legislative efforts to give the city's Board of Aldermen direct oversight of the department have stalled. (It's currently governed by a five-member board, four of whom are gubernatorial appointees. The mayor is always the fifth).

(St. Louis County Prosecutor's Office)

Updated at 5:00 p.m. March 10, 2011 with additional comments.

Former Sunset Hills police officer Christine Miller received her sentence today for the 2009 drunk driving accident that killed four people.

Miller was sentenced today after pleading guilty to all five counts against her in December 2010. She faced 4 counts for involuntary manslaughter and 1 for second-degree assault.

(Official U.S. Marshals Photograph)

Will be updated as more information becomes available.

Updated 3:45 p.m. March 10, 2011:

From the U.S. Marshals Service:

"A funeral service for Deputy U.S. Marshal John Perry will be held Sunday, March 13, 2011, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at the Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 

U.S. Marshals Service Director Stacia A. Hylton will attend."

From a U.S. Marshals Service press release: (updated at midnight to correct spelling of injured marshal's name)

- Deputy U.S. Marshal John Perry, 48, died at St. Louis University Hospital around 7 p.m. Tuesday from a gunshot wound to the head. Perry had been with the Marshals for 10 years.

- The name of the second injured Marshal has also been released. Deputy U.S. Marshal Theodore Abegg, 31, has been with the marshals for three years. He suffered a gunshot wound to the ankle.

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