Policing | St. Louis Public Radio

Policing

A MetroLink train
File Photo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 9 a.m. July 26 with more details — There will be an investigation into whether the St. Louis County officers assigned to patrol MetroLink stations and trains violated any laws, the St. Louis County Council decided Tuesday on the heels of three reports by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Police officers from several St. Louis area departments salute Officer Blake Snyder's funeral procession as it arrives at St. Louis Family Church in Chesterfield on Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio / St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens fought back tears Thursday as he explained why it was important for him to sign a measure creating a system to swiftly notify the public when an on-duty police officer is wounded.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks to law enforcement officials Friday morning at the Thomas Eagleton U.S. Courthouse in downtown St. Louis. (March 31, 2017)
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Pledging money, research and expertise for local law enforcement, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions brought a face to the Trump administration’s pro-police message during a speech Friday in St. Louis.

He also made general mention of the 2014 unrest in Ferguson after Michael Brown was shot and killed by a white officer, and the tensions between police and African-Americans.

File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Thursday was a busy day for the Missouri House, which passed four bills, including another piece of the GOP’s labor-union reform agenda.

The House also sent along to the Senate two law enforcement-related bills and a measure that would deregulate the cosmetology industry.

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger (center) speaks at the Proposition P campaign kickoff on Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017.
Erica Hunzinger | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis County voters are being tasked with another request for public funding, this time a half-cent sales tax increase for policing efforts in the April election.

Officials say they’re certain that the measure, which is estimated to bring in $80 million a year, is vital for public safety both in the county and in municipalities. But some communities aren’t sure they’ll benefit much. 

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

When citizens are shooting and killing police officers and police officers are shooting and killing citizens, something is malfunctioning in civilized society. That fact is not lost on former police officers turned UMSL criminology professors Dan Isom and David Klinger.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh was joined by Andrea Boyles, an associate professor of criminal justice at Lindenwood University – Belleville, who has recently started a research project called “How Do Blacks Police Themselves?”

Her project seeks to gain insight into how African Americans feel about neighborhood crime. On the program, we learned more about her research.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Karen Aroesty and Dan Isom joined "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

  

There have been many suggestions on improving policing in our region since the unrest in Ferguson. One of the issues that has come to light is the need for changes in police training, specifically diversity training.

UMSL criminology professor and former St. Louis police chief Dan Isom, and Anti-Defamation League director Karen Aroesty joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to talk about issues with police training including the latest recommendations from the Ferguson Commission.

Terrell Carter is pastor of the mostly-white Webster Groves Baptist Church
Terrell Carter / Courtesy Photo

Since the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown and the subsequent community unrest, dialogue about racial division in the St. Louis area became a frequent topic. Additionally, many people vowed to come together and address the apparent ‘invisible line’ separating black and white residents in the region.