Politics | St. Louis Public Radio

Politics

Harvard's Michael Sandel, pictured here during a 2013 TED Conference in Scotland, joined Tuesday's talk show.
James Duncan Davidson | Flickr

Many have asserted that the unique polarization of our current political climate has resulted in an inability – or unwillingness – to sustain civil public discourse between oppositional parties.

Michael Sandel, a best-selling author and eminent political philosopher at Harvard University, believes not only that the quality of public discourse is declining, but that this decline could be eroding American democracy.

Peter Herschend listens to a presentation Thursday, June 14, 2018. He was appointed back to the Missouri State Board of Education this week after first serving from 1991 to 2017.
File photo | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Sept. 17 at 11:30 a.m. with comments from State Sen. Jamilah Nasheed — State Sen. Jamilah Nasheed objected to one of the governor’s four appointments to the Missouri State Board of Education, leaving Peter Herschend off the board after just three meetings.

Nasheed, D-St. Louis, held up a vote on Herschend Friday during a flurry of board appointments as part of a joint-veto and special session of the legislature. Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, eventually withdrew the nomination.

House Republicans talk during the last day of the legislative session. May 17, 2017
File photo I Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri public school teachers educate their students on civics and the workings of government, but those same teachers aren’t allowed to participate in governing the state.

Missouri is one of four states where active public school teachers cannot also serve in their state legislature, according to a review of National Conference of State Legislatures data by Education Week.

Protestors against dark money make their presence known in Washington.
Dark Money, a PBS Distribution release

With a growing lack of transparency clouding money’s influence on politics around the United States, a new film digs into the issue by zooming in on one state in particular: Montana.

Why Montana? The choice of setting came down to three factors: the presence of whistleblowers, diligent enforcers of campaign-finance law and a watchdog press.

“We could actually tell the story there,” the documentary’s director, Kimberly Reed, said Friday on St. Louis on the Air.

Floyd Blackwell, Lee Smith and Raychel Proudie face each other in an Aug. 7 Democratic primary for Missouri House District 73.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Three Democrats in north St. Louis County are seeking to take embattled state representative Courtney Curtis’ seat in Missouri’s 73rd district.

Curtis has served in the Missouri House since 2012 and was eligible to run for a final term. However, he chose not to file for the state representative race because he intended to run for state Senate.

Those plans changed when Curtis was fined $114,000 for violating state-campaign finance laws. The Missouri Democratic Party blocked his attempt to file because he hadn’t paid the fines.

David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

Two Democrats running for the south St. Louis House seat being vacated by Fred Wessels say the most important issues to address are improving public safety and educational opportunities.

Steve Butz and Travis Estes have similar platforms in the Aug. 7 race for the 81st District, which includes the Holly Hills, Mount Pleasant, Marine Villa, Dutchtown and Carondelet neighborhoods.

Democrats Brad Bakker, at left, and Wiley Price IV, right, seek to replace Missouri House Rep. Karla May in District 84.
Jon Saucier Photography, Wiley Price IV via Facebook

In Missouri’s 84th House district two Democrats are competing for Karla May’s term-limited seat as she makes a bid for the state Senate.

Brad Bakker, an attorney, came to St. Louis to attend Saint Louis University; he left to get his law degree before returning to St. Louis with his family several years ago. Wiley Price IV, an events management director, is a lifelong resident of the 84th district, which includes the Forest Park, the Central West End, Dogtown, Wellls-Goodfellow and Hamilton Heights neigborhoods.

Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

Young women and mothers at the St. Louis Women’s March for Truth want people to know they plan on leading the world into a more equal society.

Maplewood teen Anabel Parveno held a sign with words from Oprah Winfrey’s Golden Globes speech: “A new day is on the horizon.”

“It’s time for a change, you know,” Parveno said. “And if women keep coming out like this to this march and we keep speaking up against all these injustices, a new dawn is going to come, and we’re gonna rule.”

Parveno, 16, said those injustices for her include the wage gap and sexual harassment.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Rachel Lippmann discusses important criminal justice and city politics stories of 2017.
Lara Hamdan | St. Louis Public Radio

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, we did a year-in-review of the top criminal justice and city politics stories in 2017. Joining host Don Marsh for the discussion was St. Louis Public Radio reporter Rachel Lippmann.

Lippmann said an important story in her beat was the election of Mayor Lyda Krewson.

“She is the first woman mayor in the history of the City of St. Louis … [and that] has led to some changes even within the criminal justice area,” Lippmann said.

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill speaks at her 50th town hall event Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017, at St. Louis Community College's Meramec campus in Kirkwood. Dec. 16, 2017
File | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill criticized a tax plan poised for approval in Congress during a town hall in suburban St. Louis — while conceding there’s little she and her Democratic colleagues can do to stop it.

At the event Saturday morning at St. Louis Community College’s Meramec campus, McCaskill, D-Mo., answered questions for about an hour, mostly on the tax bill, net neutrality and the future of Robert Mueller’s investigation of President Donald Trump’s campaign.

Facebook is facing tough questions in the wake of the 2016 presidential election. Did Russians use social media to sway the election? Why is there so much fake news? Why isn’t Facebook more transparent?

Marty Kady of Politico
Alex Heuer | St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh spoke with Marty Kady, editorial director of Politico Pro, a paywalled subscription service of multiplatform political news entity Politico. The news service is for policy wonks, lobbyists and other Capitol Hill insiders, punching in at over $3,000 per year for a subscription.

“We try to understand the underpinning politics of individuals making decisions so we can explain substantive policy better,” Kady said.

Susannah Lohr

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has raised slightly more than $100,000 since April 1 for his official campaign committee, which has taken a back seat in recent months.

Greitens' latest report, filed Monday with the state Ethics Commission, shows that he spent about $127,000 in campaign money during the same period.

The governor has spent far more in money raised by his nonprofit group, A New Missouri, which does not disclose its donors or spending. Greitens' senior advisor Austin Chambers said the nonprofit is paying at least $500,000 for the pro-Greitens TV ad campaign that began last week.

U.S. Rep Ann Wagner, a Republican from Ballwin, raised $804,000 from Jan. 1 to March 31.
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, a Republican from Ballwin, has upended Missouri’s 2018 expected contest for the U.S. Senate by announcing Monday that she won’t challenge Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill.

Wagner instead plans to seek re-election for the House seat she has held since 2013.

She had been expected to announce her Senate candidacy in the next few weeks.  A number of Republicans and Democrats already had been privately maneuvering to run for her 2nd District seat, once she declared her Senate bid.

File Photo | Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s “Behind the Headlines” with St. Louis on the Air, we took an in-depth look at some of the top news stories of the week.

Joining us on this week’s edition was St. Louis Public Radio Political Reporter Jason Rosenbaum.

Ahead of the April 4 elections in the City of St. Louis and St. Louis County, St. Louis on the Air will host several pro/con discussions about ballot measures with a proponent and opponent of the measure at hand.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday, St. Louis on the Air hosted a moderated, yet lively, conversation about Proposition A, one of the ballot measures that City of St. Louis voters will decide on during the April 4 election.

Ahead of the April 4 elections in the City of St. Louis and St. Louis County, St. Louis on the Air will host several pro/con discussions about ballot measures with a proponent and opponent of the measure at hand.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

On Thursday, St. Louis on the Air hosted a moderated conversation about Proposition 2, one of the ballot measures that city of St. Louis voters will decide on during the April 4 election. Also on Thursday, we heard about Proposition A, which you can listen to here.

Lyda Krewson in a February 2017 file photo.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

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On Friday’s "Behind the Headlines" on St. Louis on the Air, we discussed St. Louis Alderman Lyda Krewson’s historic Democratic primary win in the St. Louis mayoral race — which puts her one step closer to becoming St. Louis’ first mayor who is a woman.

A crowd of artists had many questions for St. Louis' mayoral candidates at this February 27 forum.
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

When St. Louis’ next mayor takes office, local artists will be waiting.

They’ve got a list of things they want the mayor — likely Lyda Krewson — to do in support of the arts. They presented their ideas to mayoral candidates in a recent forum presented by Citizen Artist St. Louis. Their goals include a living wage, more artists at the table when economic development plans are decided and recognition of artists’ economic contributions.

Event Flier for Mayoral Town Hall for Arts and Culture on February 27 depicts a mass of people and the dates.
Provided by Citizen Artist STL

As the St. Louis Mayoral Race heats up, a group of artists are insisting candidates address how policy makers will make sure that the city makes the arts a priority.

Artist and educator Pacia Anderson's life revolves around the arts — from her friends to her work life and projects with civic leaders.  “There’s so much overlap between arts and policy, just when I wake up in the morning,” she said.

And yet, Anderson thinks politicians don't address the intersection of the arts and policy enough. To make sure that happens in a new city administration, she and other members of Citizen Artist STL have organized tonight's Mayoral Town Hall on Arts and Culture, where candidates will be pressed on how their policies and administration would focus on the arts and the support creative people need.

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