Politics

Bill Greenblatt, UPI

(Updated 10:50 p.m., Sat., June 7)

Seven years after leaving the Republican Party, Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster has in effect taken the reins of the Missouri Democratic Party. 

That point was underscored Saturday night when -- shortly before the Democrats' annual Jefferson-Jackson dinner --  Koster presented the state party chairman a check for $100,000.

That's the second such six-figure donation that Koster has given the state Democratic operation in the past year -- making him the largest single donor to the state party.

Sheila Lumpe
Family Photo

Former Missouri State Rep. Sheila Lumpe, who reluctantly entered statewide politics and became the first woman to lead the powerful House Budget Committee and came within a whisper of being the first speaker of the House, died on Wednesday.

When her husband began cajoling her to run for the office, she balked, siding with detractors who thought her “too soft” and subject to being “eaten alive” by big-time politics.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

With a little more than two weeks left in the current Missouri legislative session, the focus of the state legislature will be on two possible veto overrides, said St. Louis Public Radio political reporter Jo Mannies.

She and education reporter Dale Singer appeared on St. Louis on the Air today to give an update on key bills moving through the state legislature right now.

From left: Sarah Palin, Cindy and John McCain
Rachael Dickson | Wikipedia

Sarah Palin has profoundly influenced my view of politics. She persuaded me, for instance, to vote for Barack Obama in 2008.

Before her introduction as the GOP’s vice-presidential candidate, I’d thought the resume of the first-term, junior senator from Illinois was a bit thin for the Oval Office and his vision for the nation’s future seemed disturbingly vague. The prospect of Sarah sitting a heartbeat away from the nuclear launch codes, however, convinced me that it was indeed time for change…

wedding rings
Wikipedia

Same-sex couples in Missouri may not want to rush across the river to tie the knot.

Even though some counties in Illinois are beginning to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, Jeffrey Mittman, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri, says marriage licenses granted to two men or two women from Missouri may not prove valid.

(Courtesy Consulate General of Israel to the Midwest)

As the Consul General to the Midwest, Roey Gilad travels between 11 Midwest states representing Israeli interests. This week he visited St. Louis for the second time since becoming the consul general last February. 

“I’m there to build bridges,” said Gilad. “The bridge is already there, I’m there to make it stronger and wider between the Midwest and the state of Israel, between Missouri and the state of Israel and between St. Louis and the state of Israel."

jimbowen0306 / Flickr

A special session of the Missouri legislature will get underway this evening with the hopes of bringing thousands of new jobs to the state.

Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon will ask the GOP-controlled House and Senate to approve up to $150 million in annual tax breaks and economic incentives to lure Boeing into building its new 777X passenger plane in Missouri.

(Via Flickr/Richard O. Barry)

Should a journalist strive most to be fair and objective? Or should his or her primary goal be transparency? Can a content-producer be both an advocate and a journalist? What is the role of the press in the future of democracy and what should its journalistic ethics be?

These are questions news outlets and individual journalists alike must answer as they navigate the future of journalism in the United States, and the topic of discussion during the Second Annual Public Ethics Conference at the University of Missouri-St. Louis on Thursday, November 14.

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis Beacon. - During almost two decades together in the Missouri General Assembly, Republican Mike Gibbons and Democrat Joan Bray agreed on little.

Erin Williams / St. Louis Public Radio

To people who feel powerless in the face of today's political structure, Princeton University religion professor Jeffrey Stout has this advice: organize.  He delivers a lecture, "Struggle for a Just Society - Grassroots Democracy in America," as part of the Lee Institute's Speaker Series on Monday, October 28, 2013.

He points to the great social movements of the past two centuries as examples of grassroots organization that affected real change in America -  abolitionists, civil rights and women's suffrage.

(Via Flickr/Boston Public Library)

In his new book This Town, self-described Washington insider Mark Leibovich paints an unattractive portrait of a capital focused on image, personal wealth and self-interest over public service.

(Courtesy PBS)

According to the U.S. Census, the United States will become a majority-minority by the year 2043, with Latinos representing the largest portion of the population.

While this shift in demographics represents a major sea-change for the country, in a way it is also nothing more than a continuation of a long story: the 500 year history of Latino Americans.

(via Flickr/marcn)

The United States Senate has 20 women in office, a mark never before reached prior to the last election. The top political seats in New Hampshire are all held by women: a female governor, two women in the U.S. Senate and women in both of the state's U.S. House seats.

Former Secretary of State and First Lady Hillary Clinton ran for president in 2008 and there is talk of her running again in 2016. Are these signs that America could soon have a woman break the last glass ceiling to executive power or are there still obstacles in the way?

Ari Shapiro at microphone
Stephen Voss for NPR

Ari Shapiro is a White House correspondent for NPR.

His stories about ongoing political negotiations in Washington, D.C. are familiar to public radio listeners as is his recent guest hosting of Talk of the Nation.

Shapiro, a graduate of Yale University, began his journalism career in 2001 in the office of NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg.  He would go on to cover the Justice Department and serve reporting stints in Atlanta, Miami and Boston.  The award-winning journalist was the first NPR reporter to be promoted to correspondent before age thirty.

This Week's Politically Speaking Podcast

Feb 7, 2013
Alex Heuer

St. Louis Public Radio’s Chris McDaniel joins the St. Louis Beacon’s Jo Mannies and Jason Rosenbaum to talk about the week’s politics.

On this week's show: We cover it all in the St. Louis mayoral race (even the diet and exercise of the candidates), we also touch on so-called "Right-to-Work" legislation that's being discussed in the Missouri House, and close it out with an update on Missouri's 8th Congressional district.

Follow Chris McDaniel on Twitter@csmcdaniel

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

State records show that Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon received a $10,000 donation from a firm with a state contract on the same day that he publicly decried big political contributions.

Records reviewed by The Associated Press show that Nixon's campaign committee received the check from World Wide Technology on Monday - the same day he delivered his State of the State address.

Permission Granted: Philip Freeman, author

The general election is less than one month away and candidates are making the final push for votes.  Over the past 2,000 years, advances in technology have drastically changed the method of campaigning though, according to an ancient Roman text of campaign advice given to Marcus Cicero, Rome’s greatest orator, advice given then is just as applicable now.

(Courtesy St. Louis Mercantile Library)

This Sunday an exhibition called “Presidents and Politics” opens at the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri St. Louis.

The campaign buttons, posters and cartoons on display seem quaint compared to this year’s high-tech presidential race, but they also show American politics has always been spirited.

The memorabilia is part of the Dr. Allen B. and Helen S. Shopmaker Political Collection, a gift to the Mercantile Library.

Dr. Randy Jotte contends that his experience as an emergency room physician is just the type of "independent-thinking approach" needed in Congress.

Jotte, a Republican, says that's why he is jumping in to the already combative contest for the 2nd District congressional seat, which takes in parts of St. Louis and St. Charles counties. Two Republicans -- Ann Wagner, a former ambassador and state party chief, and St. Louis lawyer Ed Martin -- have been competing for months.

(via Flickr/League of Women Voters of California)

Dr. Randy Jotte contends that his experience as an emergency room physician is just the type of "independent-thinking approach" needed in Congress.

Jotte, a Republican, says that's why he is jumping in to the already combative contest for the 2nd District congressional seat, which takes in parts of St. Louis and St. Charles counties. Two Republicans -- Ann Wagner, a former ambassador and state party chief, and St. Louis lawyer Ed Martin -- have been competing for months.

Pages