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MoDOT's district manager Greg Horn announcing construction work in St. Louis region on Friday, Feb. 17, 2017 outside at the Missouri Department of Transportation - February 17, 2017
Marie Schwarz | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis region can expect several major road construction projects this year.

The Missouri Department of Transportation announced on Friday that most of the road work will be maintenance and bridge repairs.

Jessica Gans Wilder, the founder and CEO of Euphrates Institute, joined St. Louis on the Air on Friday.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Janessa Gans Wilder envisions a world with less conflict and one in which people engage with others who are not like themselves.

Wilder is the founder and CEO of the Euphrates Institute, an organization that aims to promote peace through understanding. A St. Louis-based chapter recently opened.

Wilder’s path to founding the peacebuilding nonprofit is an interesting one. Prior to establishing it in 2005, she worked as a CIA counterterrorism and counterinsurgency analyst.

“It’s not a normal trajectory,” she said.

Monday's "St. Louis on the Air" will cover the pressing legal issues of the day.
s_falkow | Flickr

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Monday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

On Monday, St. Louis on the Air’s monthly legal roundtable will return to address pressing issues of the law. 

Joining the panel this time around:

FIle photo | Chris McDaniel | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 5:10 p.m. Feb. 17 — An alderman who is running for St. Louis mayor has asked the union representing city police officers to fire their business manager, Jeff Roorda, over a social media attack leveled at another mayoral candidate.

Thursday evening's statement from Alderman Lyda Krewson, D-28th Ward, targets Roorda's Facebook post that called city Treasurer Tishaura Jones a race-baiter and, in a second post, "the worst person to occupy skin."

Dick Gephardt in 2013
File photo | Sid Hastings | WUSTL

Former U.S. Rep. Richard Gephardt has a key message for everyone these days: Politics “is a substitute for violence,” and respect for all is crucial.

That's a preview of what the one-time Democratic political leader will convey during a speech on Friday at Washington University.  The St. Louis native is taking part in the IMPACT Conference, which brings together college activists from around the country.

The Missouri Capitol Building at dusk
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Thursday was a busy day for the Missouri House, which passed four bills, including another piece of the GOP’s labor-union reform agenda.

The House also sent along to the Senate two law enforcement-related bills and a measure that would deregulate the cosmetology industry.

Claire McCaskill is going to the U.S.-Mexico border next week.
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Democratic U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill plans to spend the congressional recess next week tooling along the U.S.-Mexico border.

She said Thursday that her aim is to get a first-hand look at border security issues and the best solutions. 

“Getting border security right is a critical and complex task for keeping our nation secure,” McCaskill said in a statement. “I’m looking forward to hearing directly from the folks on the ground who work on this every day, and seeing firsthand the challenges and successes they see during efforts to secure our border.”

Monsanto says it will not comment further on Bayer's bid, which is being reviewed by the board of directors.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On behalf of several farmers in 10 states, including Missouri and Illinois, a law firm has filed a class action lawsuit against Monsanto.

The main allegation is that the agriculture company knowingly sold a crop that did not have any approved herbicide to go along with it in 2015 and 2016. As a result, farmers who planted Monsanto’s Xtend cotton and soybean seed used dicamba, an illegal herbicide, to avoid damage to the crops.

The International Institute of St. Louis building.
File photo | Emanuele Berry | St. Louis Public Radio

A federal appeals panel's ruling last week lifted a travel ban for residents of seven predominantly Muslim countries, but it didn't change one crucial aspect of President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration: a 50,000 cap on refugees allowed to enter the United States.

That's is a significant drop, considering that the Obama administration raised the cap from 85,000 to 110,000 for the 2017 federal fiscal year, which extends from last October to this September. As a result, local organizations that resettle refugees, such as the International Institute of St. Louis, are finding themselves in a difficult position, having originally planned for a larger intake of people.

Alderman Jeffrey Boyd, January 2017
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

On this edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Rachel Lippmann and Jenny Simeone welcome St. Louis Alderman Jeffrey Boyd to the program for the first time.

Boyd is one of seven Democratic candidates vying to succeed Francis Slay and become St. Louis’ next mayor. 

Jay Kanzler, the Almuttan family’s attorney for years, paces in front of Country Club Hills' empty city hall building. He says the city's mayor has been targeting the Almuttans for years.
Jenny Simeone | St. Louis Public Radio

A Muslim man has filed a lawsuit against the city of County Club Hills, Mayor Bender McKinney and three aldermen, claiming that they discriminated against him.

In a suit filed last week in St. Louis County Circuit Court, Mohammed Almuttan, who is Palestinian,  claims he was denied a business license for a laundromat based on his nationality and religion.  He and his family, their attorney, and the Missouri chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations have called for McKinney's resignation.

Illustration by Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

Gov. Bruce Rauner delivered his third budget address Wednesday at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield. There has been no state budget since July 2015. 

Reporters and editors from WBEZ, WTTW, and NPR Illinois annotated Rauner's address with fact-checks and analysis. 

Mo. Dept. of Natural Resources

Jay Nixon received a nice parting gift from the Department of Natural Resources a few days before stepping down as governor: a new state park that bears his name.

But Jay Nixon State Park may soon have a new name if Republican lawmakers have their way.

Tishaura Jones 2017
Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum, Jo Mannies and Rachel Lippmann welcome back St. Louis Treasurer Tishaura Jones to the show.

Jones is one of seven Democratic candidates running to succeed St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay. All seven contenders in the March 7 primary have now taped an episode of the podcast.

Jones, the daughter of former St. Louis Comptroller Virvus Jones, made her first bid for public office in 2008, when she successfully ran for a state House seat  slice of eastern St. Louis.

St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay
File photo | Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Outgoing St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay will return to his legal roots once he leaves office this spring. He's joining the law firm Spencer Fane, which is opening a St. Louis office.

The stable of lawyers at Spencer Fane already include influential Democratic activist Jane Dueker, who represents a number of major corporate clients, and St. Louis Alderman Jack Coatar, whose district includes downtown.

KT Klng | Flickr

Of the hundreds of education bills Missouri lawmakers have filed this session, charter school expansion has the best chance of passing.

Not only is Republican Gov. Eric Greitens an enthusiastic backer of school choice, but charter school advocates say the desire for alternatives to traditional public schools is broadening.

Ethical Society of Police president Sgt. Heather Taylor speaks to a forum on disparities in the St. Louis police and fire departments on July 7, 2016. Her organization has called on chief Sam Dotson to resign.
File photo | Wiley Price | St. Louis American

The organization that represents St. Louis' minority police officers plans to use a new whistleblower law to push for changes in the way officers are promoted, transferred and disciplined.

The law, which Mayor Francis Slay intends to sign before leaving office, allows city employees to report "Improper Governmental Activities" by other city employees to a variety of city agencies.

Missouri corrections officials are not required to disclose the identities of the pharmacists who supply the state’s lethal execution drugs, an appeals court ruled Tuesday.

Reversing a lower court judge who had ordered the Department of Corrections to reveal their names, the Missouri Court of Appeals found that the DOC did not violate the state’s Sunshine Law by refusing to provide them.

Brian Stover's front yard is directly across U.S. 51 from the Patoka Tank Farm.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Brian Stover raises chickens at his house in rural Marion County, Illinois, just across the road from the Patoka Tank Farm where the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline ends — about 75 miles east of St. Louis.

Marshall Griffin|St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri House is considering a bill that would make it harder to prove discrimination when someone is fired from work.

Under the measure, an employee would have to prove his or her race or gender was the main factor for dismissal. That’s a shift from the current law, which says an employee only has to prove race or gender contributed to his or her dismissal.

Sen. Ryan Silvey in February 2017
Marshall Griffin I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome state Sen. Ryan Silvey back to the program.

File photo I Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Several St. Louis mayoral candidates scrambled Monday after they discovered tens of thousands of donations from corporations and unions are barred under the new campaign finance law that Missouri voters approved in November.

Grace Jo, now an American citizen, defected from North Korea at age six. She's now the vice president of NKinUSA, which advocates for human rights for North Koreans.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

As a little girl in North Korea, Grace Jo lived through one of the worst famines in North Korean history. While the official death toll from the notoriously most restrictive authoritarian country in the world is unknown, it is estimated that from 1994 to 1998, anywhere between 600,000 and 2.5 million people died of hunger.

Future plans for highway crossing over 364 and 94 in St. Charles. Plans to be finished in spring 2018.
provided / Great Rivers Greenway

Pedestrians and bikers will eventually be able to cross over two busy highways in St. Charles. A project is planned to construct two new pedestrian bridges over highways 364 and 94. 

Illustrations by Zack Stovall
Illustrations by Zack Stovall

Gov. Eric Greitens is a few weeks away from putting his stamp on the Missouri Supreme Court — sort of.

The Show Me State employs what’s known as the Non-Partisan Court Plan, a process that places constraints a governor’s ability to appoint judges.  

St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed presides over Friday's session of the Board of Aldermen.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis aldermen gave their stamp of approval Friday for two major public investments in sports-related facilities.

Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

A St. Louis-area Democrat is taking another crack at rolling back taxes on feminine hygiene products.

Rep. Gina Mitten sponsored a similar bill last session, but it wasn’t given a public hearing.

House Bill 41 would reduce the state sales and use tax for feminine products like tampons and sanitary pads to that of the retail tax rate of food. 

Brad Kafka is vice chair of Polsinelli’s national Labor and Employment practice group and leads the firm’s St. Louis Labor and Employment practice group.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Earlier this week, Gov. Eric Greitens signed right-to-work legislation into law in Missouri. He signed Senate Bill 19, which bars unions and employers from requiring workers to pay dues, and goes into effect on Aug. 28.

Former Secretary of State Jason Kander stands outside a St. Louis polling place on Election Day in 2016.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Often when a candidate loses a high-profile race, he or she prefers to lay low for a while. That’s not the case for former Missouri Secretary of State Jason Kander.

It’s been three months since he narrowly lost his bid to oust Republican U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt.  Since then, Kander has attracted— and seemingly sought —more national attention than he had during the campaign.

But in an interview with St. Louis Public Radio, the 35-year-old Democrat downplayed the significance. 

Josh Hawley takes part in a debate.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley says he has rented an apartment in Jefferson City, to end accusations from Democrats that he has been violating state law by commuting from his home in Columbia.

At issue is a phrase in state law that requires the Missouri attorney general to reside “at the seat of government.”

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