Politics & Issues

Political news

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich appears on St. Louis Public Radio's 'Politically Speaking' podcast in 2013.
Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Beacon

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich died Thursday; he was 54.

In June 2003, Schweich was a guest on “St. Louis on the Air,” hosted by Mike Sampson. At the time, Schweich was partner at Bryan Cave, Missouri’s oldest law firm, where he helped manage internal audits and investigations for large companies. Schweich also had published a book, “Staying Power: 30 Secrets Invincible Executives Use for Getting to the Top — and Staying There.”

Larry Morris, left, and Art Silverblatt talk to ‘St. Louis on the Air’ host Don Marsh about media literacy and critical thinking on Feb. 26, 2015.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

You’ve likely seen Facebook or Twitter posts from friends or family members that link to information that seems almost but not quite plausible. Those stories often are about politicians; recently several surfaced that purported to be about Michael Brown. How can you figure out if the video or story is real or not? It comes down to critical thinking and media literacy.

Tom Schweich announces his bid for governor last month (January 2015)
Jo Mannies/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich came across as a relatively mild-mannered politician, but when he formally declared his candidacy for governor last month, he came out swinging.

Tim Bommel | Missouri House Communications

(Updated 5:10 p.m.)

Missouri Auditor Tom Schweich has died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, shocking the state’s political world and throwing turmoil into the state’s 2016 contest for governor.

"It is with great sadness that I confirm the passing of Missouri state Auditor Tom Schweich today," wrote Spence Jackson, the auditor's spokesperson. "Please keep in mind his wife Kathy and two children."

Seventeen out of the Board of Aldermen's 28 seats are up for election on Tuesday.
Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Being an incumbent St. Louis alderman is no longer a safe bet.

For various reasons, 17 of the city’s 28 members of the Board of Aldermen – all Democrats – will be on the ballot next Tuesday in the city’s March 3 primaries.

And all but a couple of the incumbents have opposition from fellow Democrats.

(via Flickr/david_shane)

Two controversial constitutional amendments faced challenges before the Missouri Supreme Court Wednesday. Approved by voters last August, Amendment 5 strengthened gun owners' rights while Amendment 1 limited the ability to regulate farming and ranching.

Tony Rothert and Mary Bruntrager on February 25, 2015 after oral arguments on the World Series ticket case
(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

Once again, the Missouri Court of Appeals finds itself considering whether or not records generated as part of an internal police probe should be made public.

The question this time: Whether public employees like police officers can claim their right to privacy is being violated by the release of records that a court has said are subject to the Missouri sunshine law.

Bill Greenblatt, UPI

Gov. Jay Nixon's office confirmed late Wednesday that former St. Louis Police Chief Daniel Isom was stepping down from his new job as director of the Missouri Department of Public Safety.

Nixon chose Isom last fall, amid the unrest in Ferguson. The former chief was only confirmed in January. Isom's decision to step down touched off unrest in the state Capitol, with allies blaming the governor for Isom's swift exit.

gavel court justice
sxc.hu

Updated Feb. 25

St. Louis circuit attorney Jennifer Joyce has withdrawn her subpoena of St. Louis Public Radio. The station was subpoenaed at the end of January after a conflict broke out during a Public Safety Committee hearing at St. Louis City Hall.

Office of Sen. McCaskill

Missouri officials and businesses have been moving quickly to enter the Cuban market ever since President Barack Obama’s announcement in December of plans to drop the more than 50-year-old trade embargo.

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