Politics & Issues

Political news

Nicole Galloway takes the oath of office as Missouri auditor from Supreme Court Chief Justice Mary Russell.
Tim Bommel | Missouri House Communications

(Updated 4/28/2015, 11:58 a.m.)

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway has named her new senior staff.

In a press release issued Tuesday, she named John Luetkemeyer as Deputy State Auditor and Michael Moorefield as Chief of Staff.

Luetkemeyer has been with the Missouri Auditor's office since 1981.  He was promoted to executive staff in 2008 under former Auditor Susan Montee, a Democrat, and also served as Director of State Audits under Tom Schweich, a Republican.

U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver
Jim Howard I St. Louis Public Radio

This week on Politically Speaking, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies interview U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver from his Washington, D.C., office.

The Democratic congressman represents portions of Kansas City as well as several rural counties in mid-Missouri. For many years, Cleaver was a pastor at the St. James United Methodist Church in Kansas City which probably explains why he’s one of Missouri politics’ most celebrated orators.

St. Louis Aldermen Jack Coatar, D-7th Ward, and Cara Spencer, D-20th Ward, pose for a picture last Tuesday. The two youngish aldermen joined the Board for the first time last week.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

On the Nine Network’s Stay Tuned a few weeks ago, I shared the oblong table with three members of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen.

Stay Tuned host Casey Nolen described the trio – Aldermen Jack Coatar, D-7th Ward, Cara Spencer, D-20th Ward, and Scott Ogilvie, D-24th Ward – as the vanguards of a City Hall youth movement. It was the type of designation that met Spencer’s approval.

Joseph Leahy / St. Louis Public Radio

Some local mayors and transportation officials are supporting a legislative proposal to add two cents to the state’s gas tax that they say is critical to maintaining area roads and bridges.

To illustrate the problem, officials from the St. Louis County Municipal League, the East-West Gateway Coordinating Council and MoDOT gathered Friday near an overpass at Interstate 270 and New Florissant Rd.

Attorney Maggie Ellinger-Locke and activists Montague Simmons and Juliette Jacobs speak at news conference after the hearing Friday, April 24, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

An effort to remove St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch from office has survived its first hearing.

In January, Montague Simmons and three other activists filed a request for a special prosecutor to investigate McCulloch’s actions during the Darren Wilson grand jury.

Pam Hylton
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Ferguson is back in the hunt for an interim city manager, after its current interim announced she is resigning to take a permanent job in Richmond Heights.

Pam Hylton has been the interim city manager since John Shaw resigned in March.  Shaw’s departure came just after a Justice Department report that was critical of city operations before and during the unrest following the Aug. 9 police shooting that killed 18-year-old Michael Brown.

(via Flickr/lowjumpingfrog)

It’s been more than two weeks since St. Louis County’s municipal elections. But the counting in some jurisdictions continues – and may not end until this summer. Two elections even ended in a tie.

The county Board of Election Commissioners is also involved in a fight in Kinloch, where some city officials are refusing to swear in the April 7 victors, including a new mayor. The victors have been planning to oust their critics.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

With three weeks left in the 2015 legislative session, Missouri lawmakers have passed all 13 bills that make up the state's $26 billion spending plan for Fiscal 2016, which begins July 1.

St. Louis County Crisis Intervention Team officers respond to as many as 60 calls per week involving a person with a mental health issue, according to Sgt. Jeremy Romo.
Jason Rojas | Flickr

Do police do enough to de-escalate encounters with people who may be mentally ill? Why do police use guns against a person with possible mental health issues who is armed with only a knife?

These are questions that seem to crop up after any incident in which police use deadly force against someone who seems to suffer from mental health issues. They arose last week after the fatal police shooting of a man with a history of mental illness in Jennings, and after the death of Kajieme Powell last year in St. Louis.

Family attorney Anthony Gray announces that the parents of Michael Brown have filed a civil lawsuit in the Aug. 9, 2014, shooting death of their son Michael. In back from left are attorney Daryl Parks, mother Lesley McSpadden and father Michael Brown Sr.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

The parents of Michael Brown filed a wrongful death suit Thursday against the city of Ferguson, former Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson and former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who fatally shot Brown.

Attorney Benjamin Crump pointed to a U.S. Department of Justice report that uncovered racial bias in the Ferguson Police Department.

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