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Gary Pinkel is the winningest football coach in Mizzou history, and will retire at the end of the 2015 season.
Courtesy MU Tigers

Mizzou head football coach Gary Pinkel will retire at the end of this season.

According to a statement from the University’s Athletics Department this afternoon, Pinkel’s decision is "health-based." Pinkel, the winningest coach in Mizzou history, was diagnosed with lymphoma in May, but was able to continue his coaching duties as he was being treated.

East St. Louis City Manager Alvin Parks leans over the city council table Thurs. Nov. 12, 2015 to speak to Mayor Emeka Jackson-Hicks.
File Photo |Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Nov. 20 to clarify current layoff numbers-East St. Louis City Manager Alvin Parks has notified two more city employees that they are losing their jobs. Tuesday, Nov. 24 will be the last day of work for the public safety director and the superintendent of streets.

Parks said Thursday the positions are being eliminated in order to reduce the city’s millions of dollars of debt. He previously laid off eight police officers and six administrators. He also eliminated one unfilled administrative position.

Members of Missourians Organizing for Reform and Empowerment conduct a silent protest during a public hearing on municipal court reform on Nov. 12, 2015.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Members of the working group created to study and propose reforms to municipal courts in Missouri heard from three main camps at a public hearing on Thursday, which stretched for nearly three hours.

One believes the system is fine, and many of the problems identified are being addressed. Another acknowledges there are problems, but wants to keep reforms local. The third, and largest by far, wants the Supreme Court to force the consolidation of municipal courts.

First Amendment
Robin Klein | Wikipedia

Republican presidential candidates and anti-racism protesters at Mizzou don’t agree on much. Yet both made news recently by confronting journalists. Intentionally or not, they raised similar, significant questions about press freedom — and responsibility.

For journalists, it’s tempting to conclude that if you’re being criticized from opposite sides, you must be doing things right. It’s not that simple. Let’s break down the issues and look at what’s at stake — for reporters and for the public we are supposed to serve.

Dave Peacock of the St. Louis stadium task force testifies on Thursday before the Board of Aldermen's Ways and Means Committee.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

Dave Peacock didn’t mince any words about how important it is to get a stadium financing plan through the Board of Aldermen.

“We don’t have a plan if they don’t,” said Peacock, one member of Gov. Jay Nixon’s two-person stadium task force.

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

When Stefan Bradley, Ph.D, asks black students, “Do you love your university?” he says the answer is often “No, I don’t.”

“That needs to be the goal of these university officials: finding a way for all of the students to have an affection for their university and to walk away with the kind of experiences that we read about in the alumni magazines,” Bradley said on Thursday’s “St. Louis on the Air.” The show focused on campus protests shaking institutions of higher education across the nation, including the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri.

Jeffry Smith drinks a bottle of water inside the Saint Louis Zoo while wearing an empty gun holster on Saturday, June 13, 2015.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Over the next few days, gun-rights activists will challenge the limits of the Missouri’s gun laws in different ways.

On Friday, an attorney for Ohio activist Jeffry Smith will ask St. Louis circuit judge Joan Moriarty to allow Smith to bring a handgun into the St. Louis Zoo, despite signs declaring it a gun-free zone.

University City lions at city hall (2010)
File photo | Rachel Heidenry | St. Louis Beacon

A University City preservationist group called Heritage Sites Protection Initiative handed over petitions to the St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners last week with what it hopes to be enough signatures to take its cause off the streets and front porches of U. City and onto the ballot in April 2016.

The initiative wants to beef up protection for seven historic structures in this inner-ring community.

Alderman Chris Carter, right, has taken a dim view of the stadium situation.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

With several big developments swirling in the background, members of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen are set to examine a plan funding the city’s portion of a roughly $1 billion riverfront stadium.

Attorney General Chris Koster is the likely Democratic nominee for governor.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

For Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, being the target of former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg may not be so bad.

Bloomberg’s PAC, Independence USA, says it’s spending hundreds of thousands of dollars over the next few weeks on a statewide TV ad campaign that blasts Koster for “fighting Obama and clean energy.” But in a state that backed Republican Mitt Romney in 2012 over President Barack Obama by 260,000 votes, such an attack might be welcome news for a Democrat.

University of Missouri-Columbia

The activist group Concerned Student 1950 has vowed to keep pushing for change in the wake of resignations by both the University of Missouri system President, Tim Wolfe, and chancellor of the Columbia campus, R. Bowen Loftin.

Clockwise from top left - FF. Jeff Weffelmeyer, FF. Jessica Jackson, Capt. Garon Mosby, FF. Chris Tobin and Capt. Larry Conley.
UPI | Bill Greenblatt

Five members of the St. Louis Fire Department are on their way to Kenya.

Captains Larry Conley and Garon Mosby, and fire privates Chris Tobin, Jeff Weffelmeyer and Jessica Jackson will join 20 other firefighters from across the U.S. and Canada for the first-ever All-Kenya Fire Academy. The academy, a project of Africa Fire Mission, will bring together firefighters from across that country to Nairobi, the Kenyan capital, for 10 days of classes.

Army veteran Horace Montgomery practices in the pool at the Jefferson Barracks VA Medical Center. He says kayaking has been motivating as he recovers from open-heart surgery and a hip replacement.
Mary Delach Leonard|St. Louis Public Radio

Veterans Day 2015 finds Jason Pilarksi among the thousands of U.S. veterans who are still battling physical and emotional wounds from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Pilarksi, who served three tours of duty with the Army in Iraq, says he finds peace some days while paddling a kayak on a quiet Missouri lake.

“I just like to get out on the water and go,” he says.


In honor of Veterans Day, StoryCorps St. Louis brings you a conversation with friends Sherry Echohawk Taluc and Molly Tovar. Taluc is Native American. She joined the Army in 1971. Many members of her family also served the United States, including her grandfather, who was an American Indian “code talker,” soldiers who used their native language to communicate encrypted information. Tovar spoke with Taluc about her Army experience along with her family’s service heritage.

St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger delivers his inaugural address on Jan. 1, 2015. Stenger is coming into office with an ambitious agenda to change St. Louis County government -- and the legislative alliances to help him out.
File photo by Bill Greenblatt | UPI

After previously working to reach some sort of concord with St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger’s office, the St. Louis County Municipal League has come out against a proposal that would set standards for municipal police agencies.

jack coatar
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

This week's Politically Speaking podcast with Alderman Jack Coatar includes discussion about a new football stadium on the riverfront. He is sponsoring the bill laying out the financial plan for the proposed stadium, which Mayor Francis Slay and others hope will persuade the Rams to remain in St. Louis – or attract another NFL team.

Earlier today, 15th Ward Democrats President Richard Buthod said there’s widespread public skepticism about publicly financing stadiums. His group released results from a poll showing overwhelming opposition to city taxpayer dollars going to sporting facilities.

Tavis Smiley, the host of PRI’s weekly Tavis Smiley Show, said on Tuesday’s “St. Louis on the Air,” that the protests at Mizzou and the subsequent shakeup in the university’s administration were “heartwarming” to see. He also said that “what happened in Missouri can catch fire on campuses all across the country, if people aren’t careful about taking these issues for granted.”

Ferguson Commission manager director Bethany Johnson-Javois and co-chairman Rich McClure look at some notes before the start of Wednesday's meeting.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

On Monday, commissioners heard from FOCUS St. Louis, which wants to become what the commission describes as a “core intermediary” or a group that “provides infrastructure and support to advance the work of the Ferguson Commission."

Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

On Nov. 6, the St. Louis Board of Aldermen officially accepted federal funding to help the circuit attorney's office develop a program to help certain individuals avoid a felony gun conviction.

The University of Missouri-Columbia is under the national microscope after a series of racially-charged incidents on campus.
File photo by Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

With racial tensions at the University of Missouri-Columbia becoming a source of national discussion, state Rep. Steve Cookson did something on Sunday that many of the Show Me State’s statewide officials declined to do — call for University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe to step aside.