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Jun 5, 2008
2008 photo, 300 pixels, ID of people not given
Bill Smith | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 5, 2008 - Just short of its first birthday, Missouri's new 2-1-1 phone system, a referral service for non-emergency help, is within months of completing an ambitious plan to expand its reach into nine counties in Illinois. Once the program is up and running, it would make the Metro East region among the first in the state to become part of a 2-1-1 system, according to United Way 2-1-1 director Kay Archer.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 3, 2008 - When Betty Hearnes heard the news that Sen. Barack Obama would woo working-class and swing voters in Cape Girardeau, Mo., she thought perhaps the announcer had made a mistake.

"Somebody gave him bad advice," says the wife of former Missouri Gov. Warren E. Hearnes and secretary of the Mississippi County Democratic Committee in southeast Missouri.

"It wouldn't make any difference if he did back flips in Cape Girardeau. They still won't vote for him. They are going to vote Republican. He should have been told that before he went."

St. Louis fantasy baseball firm tosses shutout vs. MLB

Jun 3, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon - The Supreme Court was not expressing an opinion on the legal issue when it decided without comment to turn down the appeal by Major League Baseball. But the action effectively ends the suit in which Major League Baseball and the Players Association joined forces against C.B.C. Distribution and Marketing, the parent of CDM Fantasy Sports of St. Louis.

Commentary: Make transracial adoption more effective

Jun 2, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 2, 2008 - To take account of race or to not take account of race, that is the question -- or at least it is in transracial adoption.

The rates of transracial adoption have increased dramatically in the past decades, and research and the law are trying to keep up. From the social research perspective we've learned a few things. Historically, research on transracial adoption found no differences in outcomes for kids adopted across race compared to same-race families.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 2, 2008Although Illinois lawmakers passed a budget and skipped town Saturday night with only hours to spare before their deadline, that doesn't mean work is over for everyone.

Lawmakers have passed the red pen to Gov. Rod Blagojevich, saying it is his responsibility to bring the admittedly unbalanced $59.1 billion budget in line. On Monday, Blagojevich said he will meet with the four legislative leaders to negotiate the revenue-generating proposals that the House failed to pass.

tuition300toon.jpg
Clarion Ledger | Jackson, MS

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon June 2 2008: Now that this year's legislative sesson is over and the campaigns are in full swing for the primary, Missourians ought to look at what's needed and what's been done on several important issues. Among the most of important of these is education funding.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: May 29, 2008 - The Texas Supreme Court was divided and its opinion was not as strong as the state appeals court decision of last week. But, one point all of the justices agreed about removing people from Warren Jeffs' polygamist household: The state should not have taken the boys and pre-pubescent girls from their homes.

Commentary: Roadkill

May 29, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: May 29, 2008 - I'm indebted to our presentation editor for pointing out an article in the Southern Illinoisan: "The Illinois Department of Transportation will limit the amount of road-kill they remove (it removes) from the highway because of an expensive winter, District Nine Operating Engineer Kevin Grammer said.

Public invited to discuss plans for Arch grounds

May 28, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: May 28, 2008 - What is your vision for the Gateway Arch grounds?

The National Park Service is inviting the public to weigh in on plans for the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial at "open house style meetings'' on June 25 and July 1. The Memorial includes the Arch and Old Courthouse. 

Birmingham News

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: May 28, 2008 - I recently received a letter from Hillary Clinton. Emblazoned across the envelope it came in was a pledge that she was “going all the way.” This struck me as a rather sporting proposition because, in the high school parlance of my youth, girls known to “go all the way” were the ones you could score with on the first date.

Artists aim to leave mark on 2008 election

May 28, 2008
2008 image of Tom Huck work that will become a billboard. 300 pixels
S. Carmody | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appearing in the St. Louis Beacon: May, 28 2008 7 - A fine-arts billboard campaign with a high-minded patriotic purpose kicked off Wednesday night at a red, white and blue rally in Grand Center in front of the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: May 27, 2008 - The U.S. Supreme Court broadened the legal protection of workers who face retaliation for complaining about discrimination at work. The court ruled that workers who complained about race and age discrimination were protected from reprisals, just as are those who complain about sex discrimination have been protected since a 2005 decision.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: As we settled into our seats in the cavernous performance hall, murmurs of shock and sadness spread with word of the Hamas rocket attack on Ashkelon. Just the night before in this hall, the murmurs had been of an alleged corruption scandal and the consequent impending downfall of Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. Yet for three days soaring above these whispers were the words of Elie Weisel, “Our history should not be others’ nightmare. Our hope should not be others’ despair.” Or of Amos Oz, Israeli author and humanitarian, who reminded us that realized dreams always bore an element of disappointment.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Two different efforts to make an end-run around the powerful teachers union lobby met with vastly different fates.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: By a 7-2 vote in U.S. v. Williams, the Supreme upheld the federal PROTECT law making it illegal to advertise, present, distribute or promote material that purports to be child porn. The law was Congress' response to a Supreme Court decision several years ago throwing out a law that made virtual child porn illegal. The court threw out that law because it had traditionally based its child porn decisions on the need to protect the children depicted. With no real victims involved in virtual child porn, that justification disappeared.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Sen. Barack Obama is a bi-racial man running for president. Most people label him as African-American. Any way you slice it, some people do not support him solely because of his race. There, I said it.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Last month, Pope Benedict XVI visited the United States and promised to do everything he could to rid the priesthood of predators. Before even touching down on U.S. soil, he said, “We will absolutely exclude pedophiles from the sacred ministry.”

This is a good time to assess how his local representative is doing on that front.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The prosecution of Lori Drew in the MySpace cyberbullying case appears to be the first time that a federal prosecutor has tried to make it a federal crime for a computer user to violate one of those "terms of service" agreements that no one reads. As despicable as Drew's alleged conduct was, the prosecutor's legal theory would make most of us federal felons.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Good deeds don't need a holiday.

Sometimes, they happen just because ... it's spring.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A year later, you can almost see the egg on Terry Jones' face. About 12 months ago, the political scientist at the University of Missouri at St. Louis was among pundits who saw the political campaign of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama as the equivalent of a colt signing up for the Kentucky Derby.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: You won't catch me saying anything provocative in an email, no ma'am. Actually, that is not true. I routinely send missives that provoke and irritate half the recipients, simultaneously titillating the other half. I do not use expletives, which garishly punctuate certain bloggers' tirades and try not to embarrass my wife or my mom. In other words, I will defend every last word I write -- with today's technology you might as well be skywriting.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: More than the honorary degree Phyllis Schlafly is about to receive, the controversy surrounding her is itself fitting testament to the outsized role she's played in the national debate for most of her long life.

Once again, she stands in the spotlight - smiling and quotable - as opponents fulminate about the attention she's getting. This is vintage Schlafly.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The state Supreme Court's 4-3 decision upholding same-sex marriage is likely to face an almost immediate challenge at the ballot box.  Opponents of same-sex marriage already had been collecting names to put the issue on the ballot in November - a move that could affect who comes out to vote in California during the presidential election. (Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger says he respects the court decision and will not work in favor of the ballot initiative to overturn it.)

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Political campaigns are often likened to horse races. If you saw this year's Kentucky Derby, you'll understand why. That contest offered the perfect metaphor for the Democratic presidential primary in that the only female running wound up dead in second place, while Big Brown cruised to victory.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Replacing Justice John Paul Stevens with a Thomas/Scalia/Alito clone could move the court more dramatically to the right than any Supreme Court appointment in the past half century. The balance of the court on issues like religious freedom, affirmative action, gay rights and flag burning could switch. Hence the importance of the next president's selection of a new justice.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, two talented, evenly matched candidates, are nearing the end of an epic battle for their party's presidential nomination. It's hard to remember that the Republican contest was even more unpredictable than the Democratic one after three different candidates each had won important contests in Iowa, New Hampshire and Michigan.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: When Caitlin Ellis wants to know what Barack Obama or Hillary Clinton has to say about the economy, the war or the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, for that matter, she doesn't tune into CNN or wait for the evening network news. Instead, she's more likely to get her version of the truth by tapping into some of the so-called new media on the Web, such as YouTube, Facebook, and MySpace.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Israel at 60 can be proud of many accomplishments, and one glaring failure: the elusive peace. I have an experience of Israel across its great divide that few people in the world have had. In a country of Jews and Arabs that rarely mix, I have mixed with both.

Melissa (holding Ditto), Derek, David and Steve Squires have Mother's Day together.
Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Beacon Archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Staff Sgt. Melissa "Missy'' Squires can look at her photos from Iraq now.

The dramatic pictures of her Missouri National Guard unit, the 203rd Engineer Battalion, Company B, digging through the rubble of the U.N. building after a terrorist attack in August 2003.

The dozens and dozens of pictures of life on base, her unit's construction projects and posing with friendly Iraqis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Missouri House's action on Thursday is the latest in a complicated series of legislative actions and court decisions on the voter ID issue. Missouri and Indiana were among the states where Republican legislatures passed voter ID laws in the name of limiting voter fraud. Democrats claimed the purpose of the laws was to disenfranchise poor voters less likely to have IDs. The Missouri Supreme Court threw out the state law based on the high level of protection that the state constitution provides for the right to vote.

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