Politics & Issues

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Though the recent trend in Missouri has been to go smoke free, the Missouri House voted today to continue to allow smoking in members' offices in the Capitol building.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri House committee has passed legislation that would require some welfare recipients to undergo drug testing in order to receive benefits.

Members of the House Committee on General Laws took testimony from supporters and opponents before casting their votes.

A uniform policy for the use of traffic enforcement cameras was approved unanimously today by the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission.

The new standards require that all tickets for red-light violations be issued by an actual police officer.

For the second year in a row, the Missouri Senate is seeking direct public input for ways to, in its words, "reboot government."

Senate members are holding seminars this week to discuss the ideas sent in via email.

The Missouri House has passed a resolution urging state officials to join a multistate lawsuit challenging the federal health care overhaul and calling on Congress to repeal the law.

The House approved the resolution Tuesday on a vote of 115-46.

The resolution also urges Missouri's attorney general to defend a voter-approved law that bars the government from requiring people to have health insurance or penalizing them for not having it. The federal law requires that most people have health insurance or face penalties starting in 2014.

Did your favorite Missouri candidate lose a close election?

Well, a southern Missouri lawmaker wants to make it harder for close-election losers to get an automatic recount.

Currently, candidates for public office in Missouri can request a recount if they lose by less than 1 percent point of the total vote.

Missouri has a new State Auditor.

Tom Schweich was sworn in today during a ceremony inside the State Capitol Rotunda. 

Legislation that would block pay raises for judges in Missouri has been introduced in the State Senate.

The raises were recommended by a special commission to bring salaries for state judges closer to their federal counterparts.

The Missouri state budget is already due for more cuts this year, and that's the reason Republican Sen. Jim Lembke, of St. Louis, cites for filing a resolution to block a recommended pay raise for judges.

The Associated Press reports that "Judges have argued for several years that higher salaries are needed to persuade qualified people to serve as judges instead of working as private-sector attorneys where they might earn more money."

Lawmakers weren't the only ones filing into the Missouri Capitol today.

Around 200 people attended a Tea Party rally inside the Capitol Rotunda.  Most of the speakers sounded off on national issues, primarily taxes and the Democratic agenda.