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This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The lawsuit, filed in Cole County, claims that either Blunt or one of his top deputies or someone acting on their behalf suggested to Commission of Administration Rich AuBuchon "that it would be in everyone's best interest" to tape over the files containing backups of emails that had been sought by the Associated Press.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Tax credits are a hot topic in the Missouri Legislature. Fans of these instruments assert that tax credits are necessary for Missouri to compete with other states and to signal that we are “open for business.” Such devotion to helping the state grow is admirable. Fans, however, are not experts and a careful review of the evidence and some basic economics helps us understand why these herculean efforts are misguided. When asked whether Missouri can stay open for business while avoiding the pitfalls of the tax credit, the answer is unambiguously yes.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Wherever workers appeared to gather signatures for the initiative petition to bar state affirmative programs in Missouri, chances are that someone from the WeCAN organization was  standing by with a counter-argument against the petition.

This unusual strategy for defeating a petition before it gets on the ballot apparently succeeded.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Mildred Loving has a special place in my memory.

Almost 20 years ago, I was writing stories about the Constitution. One afternoon, on a whim, I put my sleeping 4-year-old in the car and set off from our Bethesda, Md., hoping to find Mildred Loving at her rural Virginia home.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon:  I've never liked the term colorblind. I think it's problematic and a complete contradiction. How would you feel if I claimed to be unable to see a significant part of you? Even if you wouldn't have a problem with it, the concept is inherently flawed. Being blind to people's differences isn't the answer; not judging them on these differences is.

Editorial cartoon showing rev. wright's shadow over the obama logo
John Sherffius | Boulder Daily Camera | St. Louis Beacon Archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Tuesday’s Indiana and North Carolina presidential primaries will be the first ballot box tests of the Rev. Jeremiah Wright’s impact: a lifeline for Hillary Clinton, an anchor for Barack Obama or just some flotsam among the waves?

President Bush greets volunteer Jerron Johnson before giving him the President's Volunteer Service award, the highest award for service, at St. Louis Lambert airport on Friday. (300 pixels 2008)
Adam Wisneski | Post-Dispatch (pool) | St. Louis Beacon Archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: President George W. Bush told high-tech workers at World Wide Technology in Maryland Heights on Friday that rebate checks will help counter slow economic growth and that he remained confident that the “economy is going to come on.”

Bush spoke to a receptive audience that interrupted him with applause several times during a session that included a discussion of gasoline prices, the mortgage crisis, slow economic growth and access to health insurance.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Missouri boasts a veritable catalogue of unmet needs. These include education at all levels: Teachers' pay is low; the state's support of secondary and elementary education ranks toward the bottom; and college tuition in Missouri is higher than that in any other state in the Big 12 Conference. Health care is similarly starved for resources, and our transportation infrastructure is deteriorating. The state has yet to face the fact that a modern economy demands improvement in these areas, not a slide to the bottom.

King huddles with Pam Whitcraft of the Human Society in St. Louis. Until the trials are over concerning the dogfights King participated in, he can't be adopted.
Bill Smith | Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In a small, fenced exercise yard off Macklind Avenue, Humane Society of Missouri employee Pam Whitcraft and King -- a 3-year-old male pit bull with a coat the color of yellow sand -- were taking full advantage of the warm sunshine for a few precious minutes of outside playtime.

A strong wind was kicking up clouds of dust inside the pen, but it was not the wind that was bothering the animal this Thursday morning.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The case can be fairly made that the Democratic Party has spent the last 45 years searching for JFK. Like the star-crossed lover who broke your heart that you can never quite forget, Jack’s absence haunts the party faithful with a vague, but gnawing, institutional lament.

Photo provided by Matt Adler Adler (in blue shirt) makes his pitch for becoming a delegate during a Democratic congressional caucus in March. (300 pixls)
Provided by Matt Adler | St. Louis Beacon archives

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The millennial generation -- under 30 and Internet-savvy -- is known for its interest in service to others, volunteerism and social issues. After months of political networking before and after the Iowa caucus, Matt Adler began to sense that "millennials" were ready for something new -- a leap into the political arena.

Adler, 22, a Washington University senior who grew up in the Washington, D.C. area, is evidence of young people's deeper involvement. After hard work in local caucuses, he surprised himself by becoming one of the two youngest Democrats to win slots as delegates to August’s Democratic National Convention in Denver. The other young delegate is Sam Hodge, 21, a senior at Truman State University.

Commentary: Why the Beacon

Apr 30, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Why are you doing this? It’s a question the founders of the Beacon often get.

The short answer is we believe good reporting functions as the eyes of a community. Thoughtful analysis and commentary help all of us make sense of what we see. As traditional media have faltered economically, they’ve been providing less of these crucial services. We want to provide more.

Rocky Sickmann
Provided by Anheuser-Busch

For Rocky Sickmann of St. Louis, the U.S. war on terrorism began nearly 30 years ago -- on the morning he was taken hostage by Iranian militants and survived, along with 51 other American captives, 444 days of torment.

"If you talk to a lot of the hostages, you know the war on terrorism started on Nov. 4, 1979, when we did not retaliate on Iran. And it seems like Iran has humiliated us and taken us for granted ever since,'' Sickmann says.

2008 photo of Rocky Sickmann
Provided by Anheuser-Busch

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: For Rocky Sickmann of St. Louis, the U.S. war on terrorism began nearly 30 years ago -- on the morning he was taken hostage by Iranian militants and survived, along with 51 other American captives, 444 days of torment.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: After an absence of 27 years, as part of a centennial celebration, the Mother's Day house tour in the Skinker-DeBaliviere neighborhood will be up an running on Sunday, May 11. From noon to 5 p.m., visitors may tour 10 single-family homes and a recently rehabbed apartment.

Like many city neighborhoods, Skinker-DeBaliviere has single-family homes of various sizes, two- and three-family apartment buildings and multifamily structures. Most were built between 1908 and 1920 and have a similar style.

Soldier sleeps in a couch at the USo in Lambert Airport in 2008 before the place was improved. (300 pixels wide)
Provided by the USO

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The James S. McDonnell USO at Lambert airport could use a facelift, says Kathy O'Connor, executive director of USO of Missouri.

For starters, the maroon and navy-striped couches are showing wear. The walls could use a fresh color scheme. And there aren't enough electrical outlets for the personal laptops popular with today's "plugged-in" Armed Forces.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The U.S. Supreme Court upheld Indiana's voter identification law on Monday by a 6-3 vote that avoided the normal ideological divisions. The decision won't revive Missouri's voter ID law, however, because the 2006 decision striking down that law was based on state, not federal constitutional grounds.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: In a properly functioning democratic system, the legislature should make the key policy decisions, and executive officials should implement those decisions. There is no more important policy decision than determining what types of crimes merit capital punishment. In Missouri, the legislature has effectively delegated that decision to county prosecutors.

A thank you medallion from veterans celebration in 2008 (300 pixels)
Provided

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Welcome home, veterans. The VA is looking for you.

As part of a major national outreach, the St. Louis VA Medical Center is throwing a welcome home party for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan on May 17 at the Soldiers Memorial downtown. The VA will honor the veterans at a formal ceremony and present them with Global War on Terror medals.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Olan Horne, 48, a survivor of clerical sex abuse, believes that Pope Benedict XVI's visit to the United States marks a turning point in the way victims of sexual abuse are treated in the Catholic Church.

"I saw it in his face, heard his voice. He understands," said Horne, one of six survivors who met Thursday with the pope. Horne spoke with the St. Louis Beacon from his Massachusetts university food service office.

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