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Lyda Krewson speaks with reporters after winning the Democratic mayoral primary on March 7, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Lyda Krewson, the Democratic nominee to be St. Louis’ next mayor, acknowledges the obvious: More than two-thirds of the city’s Democrats preferred one of her six rivals.

She also recognizes some tensions likely remain from the March 7 primary. “Campaigns are tough. A lot of skinned knees and scabby elbows after a campaign,” Krewson said. “But fundamentally, we’re all Democrats and we want to elect Democrats in the city in April.”

Jim Kavanaugh of SC STL, the investment and ownership group trying to bring an MLS team to St. Louis, is shown after a news conference Tuesday, March 21, 2017, announcing the group's planned investments in community development. (March 21, 2017)
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

An ownership group that’s trying to persuade St. Louis voters to help fund a professional soccer stadium said Tuesday that it will invest millions of dollars in youth soccer and job-training programs.

The ownership team, SC STL, along with St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay and nonprofit organizations at a news conference detailed the potential benefits of attracting an Major League Soccer team. Slay called the Community Benefit Agreement negotiated between SC STL and the city a “first-of-its-kind deal” that promises millions of dollars for more than a dozen organizations and initiatives — and shows their request to voters isn’t just about sports.

A St. Louis Public Radio file photo of St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Our latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast features St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, who’s making his first appearance since taking office more than two years ago.

Stenger had joined St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies in 2014, when he was a candidate against then-Executive Charlie Dooley.  Stenger ousted Dooley in a combative Democratic primary, and narrowly won a general election contest against Republican Rick Stream.

 

James Cridland via Flickr

Starting May 1, newer attorneys at private law firms in the St. Louis area will help the state’s overloaded public defender office.

A vacant building at 4030 Evans Ave. owned by the city's Land Reutilization Authority in March 2017.
File photo | Marie Schwarz | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis voters will decide next month whether to increase their property taxes by a penny in order to help stabilize vacant buildings owned by the city.

Proposition NS is on the April 4 ballot. If passed, it would allow St. Louis to sell up to $40 million in bonds, or about $6 million each year for about 6½ years. That amounts to a one-cent property tax increase per $100 of valuation on a property.

File photo | WUIS Radio

With state Sen. Daniel Biss' announcement Monday, four Democrats are now lined up to challenge Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner in the 2018 election, and more may be on the way.

Illustration by Susannah Lohr | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 4:55 p.m. with Rauner administration response — An anti-abortion law firm has sued Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner and the state of Illinois over a law that requires medical providers to tell pregnant patients that an abortion is an option.

 

The lawsuit, filed last week by the Thomas More Society, claims the provision in the Health Care Right of Conscience Act that took effect in January, is unconstitutional and violates religious rights. The plaintiffs are seeking an injunction.

St louis skyline riverboat curious louis logo
Susannah Lohr

St. Louis mayoral forums like this one have been packed. So, we know you have questions for St. Louis' next mayor.

What are they? 

Curious Louis wants to know what you want to know.

Gov. Eric Greitens and his wife, Sheena, brought their two children to a polling place before the November general election. Greitens signed an executive order extending paid parental leave for some state employees.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

With Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens issuing an executive order extending parental leave to some state employees, the question naturally arises: What’s next?

While important to the thousands of state employees it affects, the Republican governor’s executive order is not comprehensive. It provides paid time off for people who give birth or adopt a child, but only applies to “executive” state agencies run by gubernatorial appointees. It doesn’t affect or every state employee — or private sector workers .

Marshall Griffin|St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri lawmakers wrapped up the first half of the 2017 legislative session having achieved the session's top priority: making Missouri a right-to-work state.

Gov. Eric Greitens, a Republican, signed Senate Bill 19 into law last month. It bars labor unions and employers from requiring workers to pay dues and fees as a condition for employment.

The Missouri Capitol building.
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

On Friday’s "Behind the Headlines" on St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh checked in with St. Louis Public Radio Statehouse Reporter Marshall Griffin, who reports out of Jefferson City. 

Griffin gave us an update on the Missouri Legislature and filled us in Senate Bill 98, the so-called “bathroom bill.” Both Missouri House and Senate are about to start their spring breaks, before reconvening 

Webster Groves fire Capt. Jason Simpson puts a sign in the yard of a Proposition R supporter on March 12, 2017. Prop R is one of several public safety tax increases on the St. Louis County ballot in April.
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio

Voters in St. Louis County, various municipalities, and in St. Clair County in Illinois are being asked to open up their wallets during the April 4 election. Up for approval: a series of tax increases to boost spending on public safety.

There’s general agreement that the police and fire departments need the extra money, but requests by both specific municipalities and St. Louis County could confuse voters. Here’s a look at each ballot measure:

Dan Guenther March 2017
Carolina Hidalgo I St. Louis Public Radio

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jo Mannies welcome Dan Guenther to the program for the first time.

Guenther defeated longtime 9th Ward Alderman Ken Ortmann in St. Louis’ primary election. He’s heavily favored to defeat a Green Party candidate on April 4, meaning he will take his aldermanic seat in mid-April.

Wally Siewert, the director of the center for ethics in public life at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, discussed money and politics on Thursday's "St. Louis on the Air."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Earlier this month, the spotlight was cast on the brand new nonprofit called A New Missouri Inc. Formed by Gov. Eric Greitens’ campaign treasurer, the group’s focus will be to advocate for the governor’s policy agenda. Its nonprofit status assigned by the IRS means that A New Missouri can take unlimited contributions and it does not have to release information about who gave those contributions.

St. Louis Historically and Dynamically Sustainable. Cake made for progress report at the Botanical Garden in the Sputnik Pavillon on Wednesday, March 15, 2017
Marie Schwarz | St. Louis Public Radio

In 2013, the city of St. Louis launched its sustainability plan, setting  29 goals to be accomplished by 2018. At a progress report Wednesday, Mayor Francis Slay and Catherine Werner, sustainability director, gave an update on how the program is going.  

A group of transgender students protest against Senate Bill 98 on Wed., March 15, 2017, in front of a men's room on the third floor of the Missouri Capitol.
File photo | Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

A small group of transgender students, along with their supporters, gathered at the Missouri Capitol on Wednesday to lobby against the so-called “bathroom bill” that’s currently awaiting a vote from a Senate committee.

Senate Bill 98 would require K-12 public school students to use restrooms and locker rooms that correspond to their sex at birth. It would also require school districts to provide alternate facilities for students who want to use ones that correspond to the gender they identify with.

Major Garrett.
CBS News

By this point, most have taken note of President Donald Trump’s distaste of the press. But what is it like to be assigned to cover the president under such antagonistic conditions? On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Major Garrett, CBS chief White House correspondent, joined host Don Marsh to discuss covering Trump during the 2016 election and into his presidency.

JCC St. Louis via Facebook

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating another bomb threat, this one made Tuesday, against the St. Louis Jewish Community Center. 

It's the second one in less than two months, and also comes after more than 150 headstones were toppled at a historic Jewish cemetery in University City in February.

Someone emailed the threat on Tuesday night, according to St. Louis County Police Sgt. Shawn McGuire. K-9 units responded to both the Creve Coeur and Chesterfield JCC locations for protective sweeps around 9 a.m. Wednesday, though no one was evacuated. 

Ferguson Police Chief Delrish Moss speaks at a March 14, 2017, City Council meeting.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

A seemingly understaffed, overworked Ferguson Police Department is sowing unease among the some of the municipality’s residents, though authorities say they want to make sure they’re hiring the right officers.

File photo | Cathy Carver

The city of Maplewood faces a federal lawsuit for alleged discriminatory housing practices against black and disabled residents and victims of domestic violence.

The city's "chronic nuisance ordinance," which was instituted in 2006, is enforced "selectively" and ignores "similar conduct" by residents who aren't African-American, according to the lawsuit filed late Monday by the Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council, or EHOC.

School Illustration
Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated March 16, 2017 -- The Missouri House has passed legislation to expand charter schools beyond St. Louis and Kansas City.

The House proposal (HB 634) would allow charter schools to operate in Class 1 counties only. That includes more heavily populated areas such as Springfield and Columbia, in addition to St. Charles and St. Louis counties and Clay and Platte counties.

On the evening of May 22, 2011, then Governor Jay Nixon was in the basement of the Governor’s Mansion, getting ready to hop on an elliptical machine and sweat out some of the stress only a chief executive can know.

Sunday evenings were routinely his favorite time to work out; the TV positioned in front of the elliptical allowed him to catch the end of weekend NFL games, at least during football season.

Eric Greitens via Twitter

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens issued an executive order on Monday that gives some state workers a maximum of six weeks of paid parental leave after the birth or adoption of a child.

The news came in a short video posted on Twitter and Facebook that also featured his wife, Sheena Greitens, and their 9-month-old son, Jacob.

Juan Thompson portrait from The Intercept
The Intercept

A St. Louis man charged with making bomb threats against several Jewish institutions will remain behind bars until his trial.

Juan M. Thompson, 32, is too much of a threat to the community to be released without any restrictions, U.S. Magistrate Judge David Noce ruled Monday.

Voters fill out their ballots at Central Baptist Church on Washington Avenue on March 7, 2017.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis’ March primaries are in the books. But don’t exhale quite yet: April’s municipal contests throughout the St. Louis region are only 22 days away.

Granted, these are typically low-turnout affairs that don’t attract as much attention as, say, a presidential election, but they’re often critical for taxation decisions. Plus, April elections can serve as pivotal showdowns for deciding the elected leadership of St. Louis County’s multitude of municipalities.

Kacey Cordes | Twitter

A St. Louis judge will not force the city's Board of Election Commissioners to put an independent mayoral candidate on the April ballot.

Kacey Cordes paid the required $1,318.20 fee when she filed for office on Feb. 13. But because she was running as an independent, she did not submit any signatures, claiming she was not required to do so as an independent candidate. The Board of Election Commissioners rejected her filing, and St. Louis Circuit Judge Joan Moriarity upheld that decision in a short ruling issued Monday.

Screenshot from security camera video / St. Louis County Prosecutor's Office

Updated at 4:35 p.m. March 13 with comment from Ferguson police chief, attorney for convenience store and security footage — A security video made public over the weekend that shows Michael Brown at a Ferguson convenience store about a half-day before his death was a "poorly edited snippet" of something that was deemed "not relevant" to the grand jury investigation, the St. Louis County prosecutor said Monday.

Rep. Jean Evans
Tim Bommel I House Communications

On the latest edition of the Politically Speaking podcast, St. Louis Public Radio’s Jason Rosenbaum and Jenny Simeone welcome state Rep. Jean Evans to the program.

The Manchester Republican is serving her first term in the Missouri House. She represents the 99th state House District, which takes in Manchester, Valley Park and Twin Oaks.

Wikipedia

St. Louis Archbishop Robert Carlson has given members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians a special dispensation to allow them to eat corned beef with their cabbage on Friday, but most Catholics in the archdiocese will be required to abstain from meat on this Lenten St. Patrick’s Day.

Rita, an undocumented woman living in St. Louis, fills out a power-of-attorney form with the help of a volunteer attorney and interpreter at a workshop organized by immigrant advocacy groups in south St. Louis Mach 11, 2017.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio / St. Louis Public Radio

In response to high anxiety among St. Louis immigrants living in the United States without authorization, a Catholic charity and two immigrant advocate groups have organized a series of legal workshops.

Some workshops teach immigrants their rights in case of arrest; others help participants establish powers of attorney.

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