presidential primary

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Missouri’s chaotic history with presidential primaries may finally be settled, now that Gov. Jay Nixon has signed into law a measure that sets the state’s presidential primary date in March.

Under the new law, Missouri’s once-every-four-years primary would be held on the second Tuesday after the first Monday. In 2016, that date would be March 15 – the first day allowed by the two national political parties without incurring penalties.

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The "beauty contest" nature of Missouri's presidential primary earlier this week may have contributed to the lowest turnout for a presidential primary  in the state's history.

Just 8 percent of the state's registered voters cast ballots in the Republican and Democratic primaries. About 252,000 people voted in the GOP race, and 73,000 in the Democratic primary. While the Democratic vote awarded delegates, unlike the Republican contest, President Obama faced no serious opposition.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum racked up a sizeable victory in Missouri's Republican primary last night, winning all 114 counties and the city of St. Louis and beating his nearest rival, Mitt Romney, by 30 points. Final unofficial results from the Secretary of State showed Santorum more than doubling Romney's vote total.

For an election that shouldn't matter on paper, Missouri's primary on Tuesday may carry a lot of weight.

The state's Republican electorate tends to be both populist and conservative. That could give former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum, who has campaigned in Missouri the most — and the most recently — among GOP presidential candidates, the chance for a strong showing.

(via Flickr/ Daniel Morrison)

Missouri's presidential primary tomorrow

Turnout is expected to be low for Tuesday's presidential primary. That's partly because the votes for the GOP candidates won't count.

Missouri has gotten little attention from Republican candidates this election year. Newt Gingrich isn't even on the ballot.

The Missouri Republican Party made the decision after the national GOP threatened to cut delegates from states that held their elections before March. Yet the head of Missouri's GOP, Lloyd Smith, is still encouraging voting in the primary.

House website

Representative Rick Stream (R-Kirkwood) says Tuesday’s GOP presidential primary election may not be as pointless as some think.

A very contentious special legislative session ended with a whimper in Jefferson City this week.  It was dominated by seven weeks of head-butting over a wide-ranging tax credit bill that in the end boiled down to a long-running battle between the Missouri House and Senate over whether tax credits should have expiration dates.  St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a closer look at what happened.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri House leaders will now attempt to get rid of the state’s presidential primary and replace it with party caucuses.  A similar move fell short in the Missouri Senate.

Some Senate Republicans tried and failed Monday night to swap out the bill to move the primary from February to March with one that would have replaced it with caucuses.  Speaker Pro-tem Shane Schoeller (R, Willard) has filed a new bill in the House that would do the same thing.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri’s special legislative session may, in effect, be over, following Monday's actions in the Missouri Senate.

First, the Senate rejected the House version of a wide-ranging tax credit bill, voting to send it back to the House and urging passage of the Senate version.  Then Senate leaders chose not to vote on a presidential primary bill, following a failed attempt to swap it out with an alternate version that would have replaced the primary with county-level caucuses.

(via Flickr/Daniel Morrison)

An attempt to replace Missouri’s presidential primary with statewide caucuses has failed in the State Senate, meaning the February 7th Democratic and Republican primaries will go on as scheduled.

Before the vote, some amendments were offered, including one that would have moved the primary forward to January.  None of them passed, but they reflected efforts by several Republicans to preserve the state's primary.  State Senator Eric Schmitt (R, Glendale) said that caucuses result in fewer people having a say in who they want for president.

Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) is criticizing legislation in the Missouri Senate that would scrap the state’s presidential primary in favor of party caucuses.

The Missouri Republican Party announced last month that it would use county-wide caucuses to select its delegates for next year’s national convention, and that the primary would be nothing more than a “beauty contest.”

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Sen. Blunt: Obama's plan failed because it doesn't make economic sense

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., says the Senate killed President Barack Obama’s $447 billion jobs plan because it "doesn’t make economic sense to raise taxes on job creators while Americans are looking for work and our nation is facing record debt."

(via Flickr/ Daniel Morrison)

The Missouri Republican Party is abandoning the presidential primary and will use the caucus system to choose delegates for next year’s presidential race.  The decision comes as a bill that would move the party primaries from February to March remains stalled in the Missouri Senate.

The national GOP had given the state until midnight on October First to move the presidential primary to March, or else risk losing half its delegates.  State GOP Executive Director Lloyd Smith says if Missouri goes ahead with a presidential primary in February, it will not count.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri appears ready to hold its presidential primary in February - a move that trigger more confusion in the 2012 election calendar and prompt other states to elbow to the front of the campaign line.

Rules set by the Republican and Democratic parties dictate that only Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada should hold contests in February; all other states are supposed to wait until March or later. National party leaders have threatened to reduce the national convention delegates for any states that jump the line.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

The Missouri Senate has delayed debate on a bill that would move the state’s presidential primary from February to March.

The holdup involves a pending amendment that would scrap the primary altogether and return Missouri to its former status as a caucus state.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Mo. lawmakers meeting to discuss Nixon veto override

Missouri lawmakers are convening today in an annual session to consider overriding vetoes by Gov. Jay Nixon. Nixon vetoed 14 bills approved during this year's regular session.

(via Flickr/Daniel Morrison)

Gov. Jay Nixon says legislation changing the date of Missouri's 2012 presidential primary will be on the agenda for a planned special session in September.

Nixon announced this week he plans to order the House and Senate back to Jefferson City to overhaul the state's business incentives.

(via Flickr/ Daniel Morrison)

Missouri lawmakers have passed legislation to move the state's 2012 presidential primary to March 6 instead of Feb. 7 as currently scheduled.

The House gave the bill final approval in a 137-11 vote Friday. The measure now goes to Gov. Jay Nixon. The Senate had already passed the measure.

The legislation would put Missouri in compliance with rules set by the national Democratic and Republican parties.

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(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Missouri lawmakers are considering moving back the state's 2012 presidential primaries.

A bill by Republican Sen. Kevin Engler, of Farmington, would change next year's primaries from early February to early March.

Missouri has held presidential primaries in February under a state law.