Proposition B

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate has passed controversial legislation that would reverse portions of Proposition B

Voters narrowly approved the ballot measure last November, which limits dog breeders to 50 dogs per operation and requires adequate food, water and outdoor access.

The Missouri Senate has given first-round approval to a bill that would reverse portions of Proposition B, a ballot measure narrowly approved by voters last year to regulate dog breeders.

The bill would do away with Proposition B’s limit of 50 dogs per breeder, and changes the name of the law from “Puppy Mill Cruelty Prevention Act” to “Canine Cruelty Prevention Act.”

(Photo by: Hamed Saber, Flickr Creative Commons)

Missouri voters passed a ballot measure in November for tougher rules on dog breeders. Now the Missouri legislature is attempting to overturn the vote.

Check out the story from our own Adam Allington featured on Marketplace this morning.

A Missouri Senate panel has given its approval to a bill changing the state law for dog breeders.

The Senate agriculture committee endorsed legislation Thursday that would modify a ballot measure, known as "Prop. B," approved by voters in November.

The bill would delete the limit of 50 dogs per breeder and give licensed breeders up to 180 days to correct serious violations before they face criminal charges.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

A series of public hearings began today for legislation that would repeal, amend, and place exemptions on Proposition B.

Missouri voters narrowly approved the measure in November.

(St. Louis Public Radio)
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A high-profile supporter of Missouri's new dog-breeding law is meeting with lawmakers to discourage them from repealing the voter-approved initiative.

The law limits the number of dogs a breeder may have and how frequently they can be bred. It also requires animals be provided veterinary care and given outdoor access.