Public Art | St. Louis Public Radio

Public Art

An artist or advocate stands before a wall of sticky notes at RAC in 2014 artists and advocates gathered at RAC to discuss the roll of the artist in social justice movements following the shooting death of Michael Brown Jr.
File Photo | Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

People in the St. Louis region will soon have a chance to let arts advocates and funders know how to better connect with the public.

Last week, the Regional Arts Commission, or RAC, launched an initiative to bridge the gap between area residents and the arts community. 

“It’s really more about just being more aligned with what is relevant for the community today and not just based on the way we did business more than 30 years ago,” RAC Executive Director Felicia Shaw said.

"The Way," by Alexander Liberman, seen in this file photo, is a made of steel oil tanks. While modern, it nods to many facets of ancient architecture.
Provided | Kevin J. Miyazaki

St. Louis sculpture fans can now have a hand in taking care of public art.

Laumeier Sculpture Park in Sunset Hills is asking individuals and groups to help maintain and preserve its displays with a new adoption program. Adoptions start at $25 a year.

At the lower level, contributors get their names on Laumeier’s website and an on-site digital wall. For $50, they receive an adoption paper and a color photo of their sculpture. At the top level of $500, they get a private tour of the park with the park’s executive director. All donations are tax-deductible.

Merve Bedir and Jason Hilgefort explore the PXSTL space
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

UPDATE:

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation has announced the winners of its public art contest. 

Architect Amanda Williams and artist Andres Hernandez will work with Sam Fox School of Design Students to build a structure on a temporary lot across the street from the museum.

The project will be completed sometime next year.  

Original Story

The 24-foot-tall "Adinkra Tower" by sculptor Thomas Sleet was dedicated on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday.
Arts in Transit

If you see people craning their necks to look up at Riverview Transit Center in north city, here’s a reason why: They’re likely contemplating a new 24-foot-tall sculpture called “Adinkra Tower.”

Officials from Metro’s Arts in Transit program formally dedicated the work today. It features Adinkra symbols of the Ashanti people of Ghana in West Africa, representing principles including creation, hope and wisdom.

The backwards Maplewood installation by Brooklyn artist Janet Zweig is illuminated at night. "I fell in love with the city," Zweig said.
Cathy Carver

Rick Jackoway recently moved back to St. Louis after 26 years away. When he drove under a sign on the MetroLink overpass on Manchester Road he thought, “Well, you don’t see that every day!”

So he asked our new Curious Louis project:

Why is the word Maplewood spelled backward on the sign going over Manchester Road, just east of Laclede St. Road? Always wondered.

Detail of 'If a World is a Fair Place Then...' artwork Raqs Media Collective
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

As Laumeier Sculpture Park opens its Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center to the public, exhibited works will be designed to bridge international and local communities. Among those whose work is featured in the first show, which opens Friday, is Raqs Media Collective.

Detail of Lyndon Barrois Metroscape Image
Courtesy of Arts in Transit

Artists who contributed to Metro Transit's Metroscapes project are being featured in a gallery show at Hoffman LaChance Contemporary in Maplewood. The project began when Director David Allen and the rest of the Arts in Transit crew realized they had an abundance of advertising poster space left free this year.

“We thought that one way we could improve the experience for our riders at Metro is to put something beautiful in there,” said Allen.