Public Insight Network

NAACP Town Hall
9:25 pm
Mon August 11, 2014

Crowd Urged To Turn Rage Over Brown's Death Into Productive Change

Berkeley Mayor Ted Hoskins
Credit Berkeley website

A town hall meeting called by the NAACP in the wake of the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson was urged Monday evening to channel anger into productive change, but not every member of the overflow crowd seemed ready to leave the community’s rage behind.

For about 90 minutes, speakers at Murchison Tabernacle CME Church at 7629 Natural Bridge Road talked about what some called an “unfolding tragedy,” reminding everyone that the real focus should be on the fatal shooting of Brown by a Ferguson police officer, not the disturbance and looting that followed.

Read more
Gaslight Square
11:17 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Twelve St. Louisans Take Us Back To The Mid-Century Heyday Of Gaslight Square

This publicity poster showcases the wide variety of attractions on offer in Gaslight Square, from jazz clubs to fine French dining. There was even a Japanese restaurant ― a novelty in the Midwest of the 1960s.
Courtesy of the Charlie Menees Collection, UMKC.

It spanned less than three blocks at the intersection of Olive and Boyle. And it only lasted about ten years.

But the arts and entertainment district known as Gaslight Square flourished in the 1950s and '60s, making St. Louis a national destination for music and culture.

In honor of St. Louis' 250th birthday, I took a little detour off my usual science beat to explore this extraordinary time and place in our city's history.

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
4:04 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

As The Middle Class Dwindles, Is The American Dream Still Realistic?

Credit Flickr/Rob Lee

The rich are getting richer. The top 5 percent of earners in the U.S. accounted for nearly 40 percent of personal consumption expenditures in 2012, according to the Institute for New Economic Thinking. That is up from 28 percent in 1995. 

Read more
Amendment 7
11:34 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

By The Numbers: Expect Lots Of Road Work If Transportation Tax Passes

MoDOT crews continue ongoing construction on a I-64-related project. If Amendment 7 passes, the vast majority of funding statewide and in the St. Louis region will go toward road and bridge work.
Credit Photo courtesy of MoDOT

If Missourians back a transportation sales tax next month, road workers can expect a busy decade. 

That's a key takeaway of a St. Louis Public Radio analysis of a project list approved by the state's Highways and Transportation Commission. It's what will be funded if voters approve a 0.75 percent sales tax increase on Aug. 5.

Read more
St. Louis On The Air
3:45 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Dooley And Stenger Defend Attack Ads On 'St. Louis On The Air'

Steve Stenger and Charlie Dooley
Credit (Campaign Photos)

St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley and his chief Democratic rival, Councilman Steve Stenger, agree on two things: Each says his attack ads are accurate and the other guy’s are not.

The two defended their accusations during separate, back-to-back appearances today with host Don Marsh on St. Louis Public Radio’s "St. Louis On the Air."  The sparring over ads reflected another common consensus: Their Aug. 5 primary contest will get even nastier.

The two ads in question attempt to link Stenger to sex trafficking and Dooley to FBI investigations.

Read more
The Muny
9:51 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

St. Louis Family Hands Down Legacy Of Muny Enjoyment — And Employment

Sarah Heet working as an usher earlier this season.
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

Coming away with a new favorite song is part of the Muny tradition for thousands of St. Louis families. But some families are taking home more than a catchy tune — they’re also leaving with paychecks.

Five members of the Heet family have worked at the Muny as ushers. Two are still on the job. Alex Heet, 21, is a college student in her fifth summer at the Muny. Her sister, Sarah, 18, is ushering for a third year.

Read more
Fourth of July
8:46 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

Where Are The Fireworks? We Map Options For Viewing On Independence Day

Credit MJ_07 / Via Flickr

For many, fireworks are a staple part of celebrating the Fourth of July. If watching the night sky light up is part of your holiday tradition, you’re in luck: the St. Louis area hosts several public events.

Tasmyn Front has been living in St. Louis for 12 years. She says that fireworks aren’t the only attraction to consider when deciding on a venue.

“There’s a lot of waiting before the show starts,” said Front. “Ultimately it's only 20 minutes so you want it to be worth the wait.”

Music, food and activities for the kids are standard at most venues.

Read more
St. Louis on the Air
3:50 pm
Tue July 1, 2014

St. Louis Has Fewer Catholics But Does That Signal Decline?

Cathedral Basilica of Saint Louis
(via Flickr/Scuddr)

Institutional religions are losing members to those who claim to be “unaffiliated,” people who are often religious or spiritual in some way but don’t belong to an institution. Nearly one in five of U.S. adults are “unaffiliated” according to the Pew Research Center.

Read more
Primary Election 2014
10:11 pm
Sun June 29, 2014

Five Things You Need To Know About Transportation Tax

Credit Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio

Missourians will vote Aug. 5 on a 0.75 percent sales tax increase for transportation projects. The proposal — commonly known as the transportation tax — would generate billions of dollars over the next decade to fix roads, repair bridges and improve mass transit. 

The stakes are high. Supporters say Missouri needs more money for its aging transportation infrastructure. With gas tax revenue dwindling and federal funding uncertain, some policymakers see the sales tax as a guaranteed way to fund transportation needs.

Read more
Unaccredited Districts
8:43 pm
Sun June 22, 2014

Parents Of Normandy Transfer Students Wait To See If Districts Will Follow Francis Howell’s Lead

From left, Andre', Anandra, BrenNae and SheRon Chaney stand on the porch of their family home in Pasadena Park in north St. Louis County.
Credit Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

Anxiety crept through SheRon Chaney when she heard that the Francis Howell School District would no longer accept about 350 transfer students from Normandy who were signed up to continue in the program. 

“Last year we were hopeful, this year we’re fearful,” she said. 

Chaney transferred her middle school aged daughter BrenNae to Maplewood Richmond Heights last year.  And even though Francis Howell’s decision —  made during a closed session of its school board — doesn’t affect her directly, it has Chaney and hundreds of other parents holding their breath.  

Read more

Pages