Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts

An international conversation about culture on Twitter is being joined by The Contemporary Art Museum, The Pulitzer Arts Foundation, The Sheldon Concert Hall and The Kemper Museum. For Contemporary Art Museum PR/Marketing Assistant Liz Deichmann, the event bridges the gap between local and international art institutions.

Two looks of Raja
Provided by the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts

As our city rocked from the upheavals of 2014, a series of quieter changes was taking place in the St. Louis art world.

Several arts organizations debuted, others expanded and a few folded. Some relocated and others featured uncharacteristic fare to appeal to wider audiences. Here’s a look at eight of this year’s evolutions in the local arts scene.

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation gave a tour of ongoing renovations Nov. 19.
Carly Ann Hilo | Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Although the Pulitzer Arts Foundation has been closed since August, a swarm of activity has been taking place inside the Grand Center institution.

Construction crews are renovating the Pulitzer’s basement area to create two new galleries. When they’re done in May 2015, the Foundation will have one-third more exhibition space, totaling 104,000 square feet. The work is being done in cooperation with a representative of the original architect, Tadao Ando.

Michael Allen / Preservation Research Office

A five-day symposium with a funny name wants to promote environmental and sustainability awareness in the Midwest.

The Marfa Dialogues, which ends Sunday at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, includes several activities to highlight creative approaches to addressing environmental issues.

Architectural historian Michael Allen and installation artist Carlie Trosclair are creating an installation today that highlights urban demolition in St. Louis, “30 Days of Demolition.”

Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts
Provided by the foundation

St. Louis’ Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts will undergo a major expansion to increase its square footage by one-third.

photo by David Johnson / Organized by the Pulitzer Foundaton for the Arts & the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts

Updated Monday, May 12 to include the fourth exhibition at CAM.

Three St. Louis institutions are opening major contemporary art exhibitions tonight: the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis and the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University.

In the hope that St. Louisans will make it an “art night out,” a free shuttle service between the Kemper and Grand Center is being provided from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

David Johnson | PXSTL

 Think of it as your very own performance and gathering space. A former vacant lot, across the street from the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St. Louis’ Grand Center, is booked for more than a dozen events through October. But in between, bring your guitar and your friends for a sing-a-long under its floating canopies. Or relocate your book club there for the summer.

“We want people to just respond to the space in ways we haven’t even imaged yet — and neither have they,” Pulitzer executive Kristina Van Dyke told St. Louis Public Radio.

The Pulitzer, photographer David Johnson

What is St. Louis doing to combat climate change? And how can art and design move those plans forward?

The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts wants to publicize ongoing efforts and encourage new collaborations in its Marfa Dialogues competition. Winners will receive $2,500 and the opportunity to display their ideas in a public forum, which may take many forms, including exhibitions, readings, concerts and film screenings.

Courtesy of Tokyo Institute of Technology

The Kemper Art Museum is hosting the very interesting “On the Thresholds of Space-Making: Shinohara Kazuo and His Legacy.” The exhibit, which runs through April 20, includes photos, original drawings and sketches. It is the first U.S. museum exhibit on an architect who helped reinvent architecture in Japan.

Courtesy Pulitzer Foundation of the Arts

The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts opened a new exhibit Friday, February 14 exploring the evolving life of art. “Art of Its Own Making” features the work of more than 11 artists and is on display now until August 20.

“This is a show that looks at the interplay between viewers, artworks and the environment – how does one affect the other?” Pulitzer director Kristina Van Dyke said.

For example, Edith Dekyndt’s work, “Ground Control” is a big black ball filled with helium that reacts to viewers. The more people in the room with it, the higher the ball rises.

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