Quincy

Field of students at a graduation
(via Flickr/j.o.h.n. walker)

A four-year pilot initiative in Quincy hopes to develop a pipeline of skilled workers to fill technical jobs at local businesses.

Jason Parrott

After losing at least 1,000 trees in a windstorm last month, the city of Quincy is starting efforts to replace them.

The city is working with the Quincy Park District and the organization ‘Trees for Tomorrow’ on the project.

‘Trees for Tomorrow’ is a non-profit organization funded by private donations that has planted over 700 trees over the past seven years.

All of the replacement trees are donated, with each tree costing $275.

Jamie Bockenfeld-Parrott

(Updated at 1:00 p.m., on Friday, July 17)

Quincy city officials say that the state of emergency will be lifted at noon on Saturday. All streets are now passable and Ameren Illinois reports that nearly everyone's power has been restored.

(Updated at 4:30 p.m., on Wednesday, July 15)

Ameren Illinois reports nearly 10,000 customers remain without power in and around Quincy following Monday night’s powerful thunderstorm that choked the city’s roadways with toppled trees and downed power lines.

Quincy’s mayor Kyle Moore says 70 percent of the city’s streets are now passable and he expects power for most residents to be restored by  Wednesday night.

Garbage and recycling services are suspended for the rest of the week to allow crews to focus on clean up. The mayor says the city’s parks were hardest hit and some may take years to restore their tree canopies.  

(Our original story)

The city of Quincy is recovering after a powerful thunderstorm toppled trees and knocked out power for tens of thousands of area residents Monday night.

Many streets remained blocked by fallen branches and utility poles as of Tuesday afternoon and power is expected to remain off for thousands of homes until at least Wednesday, said Mayor Kyle Moore.

        

The city of Quincy, Ill., is celebrating its 175th anniversary this year, which will include concerts at its riverfront park on the east bank of the Mississippi River.
Lpangelrob, via Wikipedia

After holding a kick-off event Tuesday evening, Quincy, Ill., is launching a yearlong series of events to celebrate its 175th anniversary.

Quincy's Mayor Kyle Moore said various community events and concerts will round out the festivities throughout the year. An anniversary bash in May during the city's dogwood celebration will feature a parade with a #Quincy175 theme and a Saturday night street concert. Four regional acts will perform. 

(via Enbridge)

In Quincy, Ill. the Mississippi River is a popular place to go boating.

Just a few miles north of here, in another part of Adams County, Enbridge's new Flanagan South pipeline project has quietly been given the go-ahead to cross the nation’s busiest river.

The 36-inch diameter pipeline will initially carry 600,000 barrels per day of heavy crude oil primarily from Canada’s tar sands region in Alberta. Light crude from the Bakken Formation in Montana and North Dakota could also flow through it.

Authorities in western Illinois say a drug bust at a Quincy home turned up more than 500 containers used to make methamphetamine.

Illinois State Police Master Sgt. Patrick Frazier on Monday told The Quincy Herald-Whig that it's the biggest bust he's seen involving such "one-pot" shake-and-bake labs. Officers also found more than 180 cans of starter fluid, cans of drain cleaner and used boxes of pills that contain a key meth-making ingredient.

A special truck had to be called to handle the meth waste. The building has been quarantined.

(Courtesy WQUB)

We have some news of our own to share with you today.

St. Louis Public Radio announced today that it is in the process of buying the public radio station in Quincy, Ill.

WQUB 90.3 FM is currently owned by Quincy University, but St. Louis Public Radio General Manager Tim Eby says the school indicated last year that it could no longer handle the operations of the station, and wanted to focus, instead, on educational priorities.