Race Relations | St. Louis Public Radio

Race Relations

Kris Kleindienst, co-owner of Left Bank Books, stand next to the ResiSTL display table.
Maria Altman | St. Louis Public Radio

The protests in St. Louis over the last three weeks have topped the news almost daily.

Even for those who stay up on what’s happening, there may be questions about how this came to pass again, just three years after race-related protests in Ferguson.

Delving into St. Louis’ history of racial division and relations between police and black people can seem overwhelming. St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman set out to make a reading list with recommendations from people who are used to being asked.

A mob stops a street car during the East St. Louis race riots, which started on July 2, 1917.
University of Massachusetts-Amherst Libraries

One hundred years after the 1917 East St. Louis race riots a permanent monument to victims will be dedicated, and educational programs, musical and theatrical presentation, and other events will be held.

The East St. Louis 1917 Centennial Commission and Cultural Initiative announced its plans Wednesday. Commission vice chairman Edmond Brown, president of ELB Enterprises, said the monument will “commemorate those lost during that time, to act as a point of education as well as for healing of the community.” Commission chairman, the Rev. Joseph Brown, a professor of Africana studies at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, said there will also be “rituals taking place around East St. Louis to respect the places where we know people were murdered.”

The Mourning Society of St. Louis, which re-enacts 19th century funerals at Bellefountaine Cemetary, was the first group to walk in the Golden Lane parade.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Hundreds of women celebrated the right to vote Saturday in downtown St. Louis by re-enacting a suffragette protest that took place on Locust Street during the Democratic National Convention of 1916.

The League of Women Voters invited the women to dress in white, wear sashes and carry golden umbrellas just like an estimated 3,000 suffragettes did during the original protest, when they waged a “walkless, talkless” protest by lining the street the male delegates had to walk from their hotel to the convention. 

Will Rivers and Brandon King on the scene at the race summit
Courtesy Jane Bannester / Ritneour High School.

We're getting close to launching our next season of We Live Here with more episodes about education, housing, economics and a host of other topics.

But we're still needing a little more time, so we're reminding you of a show we did early on -- about kids and the way they learn to talk to each other about race. 

 

Tim Lloyd / St. Louis Public Radio

This is Kameel Stanley's inaugural article for St. Louis Public Radio's We Live Here project. We asked her to introduce herself. Here is what she wrote:

Two things have consistently come up since I moved to St. Louis a few weeks ago.

Namely, my roots and my race.

Goldie Taylor
Robert Ector Photography

As discussions about race relations continue across the nation, many people are working to bridge the gaps.

Goldie Taylor, former St. Louisan and senior editor for Blue Nation Review, joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to talk about the issues and importance of social equality. Taylor is also a contributor for CNN and HLN, and a former contributor for MSNBC.