Raymond Burke | St. Louis Public Radio

Raymond Burke

Cathedral Basicila of St. Louis votive candles
Rachel Heidenry | 2008

Cases against two former St. Louis Catholic archbishops are being submitted to Pope Francis’ new Vatican tribunal that investigates bishops accused of covering up abuse.

Tony Flannery
Courtesy of Call to Action

In 2012, Tony Flannery, an Irish priest and religious writer, found out the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Vatican’s watchdog group, was displeased with some of his writings about the church.

Raymond Leo Burke, spring 2008
Wikipedia

Monday two former St. Louis archbishops, Cardinal Raymond Burke and Cardinal Justin F. Rigali, lost their posts on the Congregation for Bishops. This powerful Vatican committee nominates priests to be bishops worldwide. It meets on alternate Thursdays in Rome.

While Rigali's removal is not unexpected since he is retired with the title Philadelphia archbishop emeritus, the Burke move is dramatic.

Burke is a Vatican cardinal "in full" and head of the tribunal of last resort, which can countermand bishops when they want to remove priests from the clerical state, for example.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: June 27, 2008 - The pope has reassigned St. Louis Archbishop Raymond Burke to Rome to be the top administrator of one of the Catholic Churches three courts, its court of last appeal, according to an announcement by the Vatican press office.

He is the first American to hold the post, though Americans have served on the court. Burke has been on the tribunal for two years, commuting to Rome from St. Louis.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Last month, Pope Benedict XVI visited the United States and promised to do everything he could to rid the priesthood of predators. Before even touching down on U.S. soil, he said, “We will absolutely exclude pedophiles from the sacred ministry.”

This is a good time to assess how his local representative is doing on that front.

How a bishop is named

May 14, 2008

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Who knows the name of the next New York archbishop? The pope, if he has decided.