reality TV

Black Middle Class
10:49 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

What's A 'BAP?' St. Louisans Duke It Out On Reality TV Spotlighting Black Middle Class

Jason Wilson, coffee in hand, talks with two of his workers at the Northwest Coffee Shop in the Central West End.
Credit Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

Stay tuned for rock-star style drama tonight as six St. Louisans argue and scream their way through a new Lifetime TV reality show called “BAPs,” which stands for Black American Princess. Or Prince, in the case of local coffee shop owner Jason Wilson.

Wilson is the founder of Chronicle Coffee and gathering space in north St. Louis, and owns two Northwest Coffee shops. He’s also among the “BAPs” cast pulled together by a Los Angeles production company.

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St. Louis on the Air
5:31 pm
Wed December 18, 2013

St. Louis' 'Trash' Makes National Television Debut

Sam Coffey, Salvage King, is featured in the new, "Salvage City."
Credit Coolfire Originals

Like many cities in the Midwest, St. Louis' factory and warehousing industries have declined since their prominence in the early to mid-20th century.  Calling St. Louis a "Rust Belt bone yard," entrepreneurs from Cherokee Street in south St. Louis are featured in a new locally produced reality cable show, "Salvage City," where they turn so-called junk into a gold mine.

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St. Louis on the Air
4:37 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Why Are So Many Reality Television Shows Based In St. Louis?

Sue McCarthy with her daughters. They own Women's Closet Exchange in South County and starred in Resale Royalty on the Style Network.
(Courtesy: Coolfire Originals)

Resale Royalty. Welcome to Sweetie Pies. Funeral Boss. Salvage City. If you are a fan of reality-based TV, these shows may be familiar to you.

All of them take place in St. Louis. And all of them were produced by St. Louis-based television production companies Coolfire Originals and NoCoast Originals, who often work in partnership to create what they call "unscripted" shows.

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