recycling

Five-year-old Charlotte Pappan selects foam leaves for a sun painting at the Earth Day Festival on Sunday, April, 26, 2015. Her mother, Sara Pappan, looks on.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

The sound of music, children, dogs and generators filled the air Sunday at the annual Earth Day festival in Forest Park. Food trucks and other booths needing electricity were fueled by propane generators that release half the emissions of standard diesel generators.

According to festival organizers, more than 50,000 people attended the event.

Trucks dump their loads of single-stream recycling on the "tip floor" at Resource Management's Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) in Earth City, Mo.
Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

If you recycle at home, chances are you take advantage of a system called “single-stream” recycling: you mix all your bottles, newspapers, cans and containers together in a roll cart or dumpster, and a truck comes by once a week to pick them up.

But what happens next? Is that jumble of broken glass, paper, metal and plastic really getting recycled?

Provided by Perennial

A local program re-purposing broken chairs helps heal women with criminal convictions as they prepare to re-enter society.

The hit TV series “Orange Is the New Black” explores the lives of women behind bars. But even after their release, orange remains an important color to some of St. Louis' former female inmates. So do purple, green and the entire rainbow.

(Courtesy of the St. Louis Cardinals)

The St. Louis Cardinals are highlighted in a new report that features environmental initiatives by the professional sports industry.

The report released today by the Natural Resources Defense Council describes efforts by sports leagues, teams, and venues to save energy and water, and reduce waste.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

St. Louis City is reminding residents of changes to the trash/recycling collection schedule due to the holidays. The schedule is below:

Week of December 26, 2011

(via Flickr/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Midwest Region)

As Joplin, Mo. continues to recover from the tornado that devastated the area just over a month ago, there is an unfortunate report of another death related to the disaster, along with an effort to make something useful out of the wreckage.

Joplin's public information office says it was notified Wednesday of the death of Grace M. Sanders, who was injured in the tornado. No other information about the victim or the death was released.  With Sanders' death, the number of deaths from the tornado has now risen to 156.

The City of St. Louis is once again offering free Christmas tree recycling this year.