Robin Carnahan

Russ Carnahan
Rachel Lippmann | St. Louis Public Radio | File photo

Former U.S. Rep. Russ Carnahan, a member of arguably Missouri’s most prominent Democratic family, has ended months of speculation by filing paperwork to run for lieutenant governor.

On Friday, Carnahan set up a campaign committee with the Missouri Ethics Committee.

Former Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan, a Democrat who lost a 2010 bid for the U.S. Senate, will be headed to Washington -- at least part of the time -- after all.

She has joined Washington-based Albright Stonebridge Group (ASG), a major commercial diplomacy and strategic advisory firm, as a senior director.  One of the chairs of the firm is former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright.

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

For the first time in a long time, no member of the Carnahan family is holding public office in Missouri.

Secretary of State Robin Carnahan left office earlier this week after deciding not to seek re-election last November.  Her brother, Congressman Russ Carnahan (MO – 3), served four terms in the U.S. House of Representatives.  After re-districting, he challenged Congressman Lacy Clay in the Democratic primary and was unsuccessful.

How Much Will Emerson's Special Election Cost?

Dec 14, 2012
Rep. Emerson's flickr page.

Electing a replacement for retiring Missouri U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson won't come cheap.

Weeks after winning re-election to a 10th term, the Cape Girardeau Republican announced earlier this month she is retiring from Congress in February to become president and CEO of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

Proposition B asks to voters to allow their local city or county to continue collecting sales tax on cars bought out of state
File photo | St. Louis Public Radio

There has been a lot of talk this year about changing I.D. requirements for voters, but Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) wants residents to know that the law hasn’t changed in Missouri.

Carnahan says voters can bring a driver’s license or other photo I.D. to the polls if they so choose, but that photo identification is not mandatory.

(via Flickr/bloomsberries)

Updated at 5:33 p.m. to include quotes from one of the Republican sponsors of Amendment Three and from the Sec. of State's Communications Director.

Citing what they call "deliberately deceptive and hopelessly biased ballot language," supporters of a measure that would change the way some appellate judges are selected in Missouri say they will not campaign for their ballot measure.

(via Flickr/s_falkow)

A Cole County judge has upheld a ballot summary prepared by Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) for a proposed constitutional amendment that would expand the governor’s role in appointing State Supreme Court judges.

The ballot language for Amendment 3 asks:

Shall the Missouri Constitution be amended to change the current nonpartisan selection of supreme court and court of appeals judges to a process that gives the governor increased authority to:

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

There will be no challenge to the new language inserted onto a ballot initiative by a Cole County judge regarding health insurance exchanges.

The version initially approved by Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) had asked if state law should, “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care,” unless the people or the legislature created an exchange.  In a statement, Carnahan says Attorney General Chris Koster (D) refused to file an appeal on her office’s behalf.  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) filed suit against Carnahan over that language.  He applauded the Democratic Attorney General’s move.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

Updated 4:15 p.m. Thursday: Carnahan will not appeal Judge Green's new language, saying Attorney General Chris Koster refused a request for further legal action, and the Secretary of  State's office is not in a position to appeal on its own.  A full version of today's developments can be found here.

Our original story:

The language used in a ballot initiative approved by Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) has been tossed out by a Cole County judge.

Proposition E centers on the conditions for creating a health care exchange in Missouri; the language authorized by Carnahan read in part whether the law should “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care.”  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) called the language used by the Secretary of State unbelievably biased.

(via Flickr/Jennifer Boriss)

(Update:  Judge Daniel Green ruled in favor of Lt. Gov. Kinder and changed the ballot language initially approved by Sec. of State Carnahan...an updated version of this story can be found here.)

A Cole County judge heard arguments today in a lawsuit that claims Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) deliberately used misleading language in a ballot initiative regarding the creation of a health insurance exchange.

The language in question asks in part if the law should “deny individuals, families and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care.”  Attorney Jay Kanzler represents Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) and a group of Republican legislative leaders who filed suit.

(via Flickr/hlkljgk)

A Cole County judge heard arguments Friday on whether to issue a temporary restraining order against Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D).

Carnahan and Republican leaders are sparring over the language used in a ballot initiative regarding health care exchanges.  Lt. Governor Peter Kinder and GOP lawmakers accuse Carnahan of using misleading language in order to influence voters to defeat the ballot question in November.  Attorney Jay Kanzler represents the plaintiffs.

“Secretary of State Carnahan's language talking about denying families and individuals access to affordable health care frankly doesn’t even come close to describing, in fact, what the ballot initiative would do,” Kanzler said.

Provided photos/Flickr

Robin Carnahan’s decision to not seek a third term as Missouri Secretary of State has opened the door for seven hopefuls from four different political parties.  The contest had been relatively quiet until about two weeks ago, when the three Republican contenders began airing TV ads and stepping up their campaign appearances.  St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin takes a look at the three GOP candidates who want to become Missouri’s next Secretary of State:

(via Flickr/Congress of local and regional authorities)

Voter turnout in Missouri is expected to be around 25 percent for next Tuesday’s party primaries, according to the Secretary of State’s office.

A turnout of 25 percent would be slightly higher than the 23 percent of Missouri voters who cast ballots in the 2010 primaries.  Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) says voter turnout is notoriously hard to predict.

“In fact, our office doesn’t even do it," Carnahan said.  "We ask the local election officials, the 116 of them around the state, to give us their predictions, based on what is on those local ballots.”

Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder (R) and GOP legislative leaders have filed a lawsuit against Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) over the language used in a ballot initiative regarding health care exchanges.

The language approved by Carnahan asks if the law should be amended to, “deny individuals, families, and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care plans through a state-based health benefit exchange unless authorized by statute, initiative or referendum.”  Kinder says the language skews the ballot question’s true purpose, to bar the governor from creating an exchange by executive order.

(via Flickr/s_falkow)

Update at 5:46 p.m.:

According to Mo. Sec. of State Robin Carnahan's office, Judge Daniel Green of the Cole County Circuit Court has denied the temporary restraining order. The decision means candidate filing for Missouri state Senate districts will begin Tuesday morning, as scheduled.

Updated at 4 p.m. with comments from plaintiff

There's another twist in the ongoing legal battle over the new districts for the Missouri State Senate.

(via Flickr/tastybit)

The "beauty contest" nature of Missouri's presidential primary earlier this week may have contributed to the lowest turnout for a presidential primary  in the state's history.

Just 8 percent of the state's registered voters cast ballots in the Republican and Democratic primaries. About 252,000 people voted in the GOP race, and 73,000 in the Democratic primary. While the Democratic vote awarded delegates, unlike the Republican contest, President Obama faced no serious opposition.

Flickr/Todd Ryburn

Illinois is a "plaintiff's paradise"

The American Tort Association ranks Madison, St. Clair and McClean Counties in Ill. among the most unfair court jurisdictions in the nation. Cook County is on the watch list.

The Association is made up of businesses concerned that judges and juries in those counties are more likely to side with plaintiffs. Class action lawsuits often result in huge payouts.

Travis Akin is with the Illinois Lawsuit Abuse Watch and says being on the list is a harmful distinction.

Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) is criticizing legislation in the Missouri Senate that would scrap the state’s presidential primary in favor of party caucuses.

The Missouri Republican Party announced last month that it would use county-wide caucuses to select its delegates for next year’s national convention, and that the primary would be nothing more than a “beauty contest.”

(via Wikimedia Commons)

Updated 5:02 p.m. with statement from the Missouri Democratic Party.

Update: 3:22 p.m.: Mo. State Rep. Jason Kander, D-Kansas City has announced he will be a candidate for the position via an announcement on his website. Here's an excerpt:

(via Flickr/KOMUnews)

A second Missouri Republican state lawmaker will be running for Mo. secretary of state.

Republican Sen. Scott Rupp announced his candidacy Monday, joining Republican Sen. Bill Stouffer in the race.

In a news release, Rupp cites his experiences on issues such as illegal immigration and Internet predators as qualifications for the position.

He also says he’s created the only oversight committee to root out fraud and abuse of taxpayer funds in the stimulus package.

(via Flickr/iChaz)

Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan (D) is warning citizens to beware of several threats to those seeking to invest their savings.

Carnahan says one such threat is called affinity fraud, which is used to target church congregations, senior centers and social networking websites.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A Democratic state Representative from the St. Louis area has officially asked Secretary of State Robin Carnahan to investigate whether Congressman Todd Akin broke any rules by voting in Town and Country despite having an official residence in Wildwood.

Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan says brokerage firm A.G. Edwards has reached a $755,000 settlement with the state of Missouri.

Carnahan said Tuesday in a release that the settlement ends an investigation that resulted from a complaint by an 81-year-old southwest Missouri investor. Carnahan said the consent order stemmed from her investigation that found the firm sold annuities to elderly customers without proper documentation.

Updated 5:40 p.m. Feb. 25, 2011.

A State Senator from rural western Missouri has announced he'll seek the Republican nomination for Secretary of State next year.

Bill Stouffer (R, Napton) was first elected to the Missouri Senate in 2004 and re-elected in 2008.

He made an unsuccessful bid for Congress last year, losing the GOP nod to Vicky Hartzler in Missouri's 4th District.  Hartzler later unseated incumbent Democrat Ike Skelton.

Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Senate has passed a resolution that would require voters to show photo identification at the polls.

The proposed constitutional amendment was passed without debate along party lines, with all seven Democrats voting "no" and all Republicans present voting "yes."

The Federal Election Commission says Missouri Democrat Robin Carnahan can set up a legal defense fund to help cover $85,000 of costs from a copyright lawsuit brought by the Fox News Network.

Former Missouri Senate candidate Robin Carnahan has settled a lawsuit with the Fox News Network alleging copyright infringement by one of her campaign ads.

Flickr Creative Commons Brad Lucid
  • Missouri schools could face a $24 million funding shortfall because tax revenues from casinos are falling short of projections. The executive director of the Missouri Gaming Commission warned the state's budget director of the revenue gap in a letter shortly before Christmas. The document was provided Wednesday to The Associated press. Gaming Commission director Roger Stottlemyre says casinos had been expected to produce about $372 million for education this year.

Outgoing auditor Susan Montee has released two new reports that find problems in a couple of the executive branch offices in Missouri.

One report, on the office of Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder, found some problems in manual timesheets and leave slithat Kinder's staff filled out. For example:

only 300 wide. robin carnahan campaigning for senate
Jo Mannies | St. Louis Beacon | 2010

Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Robin Carnahan called today for members of Congress to take a 10 percent pay cut until they balance the federal budget.

Robin Carnahan talked about economic pain and the need for Congress to understand what the public is feeling.

Carnahan, currently Missouri's secretary of state, told supporters at a Clayton pharmacy that a pay cut would force Congress to feel some of the economic pain that many Americans now suffer, and shift legislators' attention.

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