Ron Himes | St. Louis Public Radio

Ron Himes

Ron Himes, Beverly Foster and Dr. John Morris discussed how Alzheimer's disease impacts African-American patients and families.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

African-Americans over the age of 70 are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease as white people. While there are no answers, said Dr. John Morris, director of the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University, there are some factors that might be contributing to this gap.

"Lines in the Dust" is playing at The Black Rep from January 11 - 29 . Its themes revolve around inequity in education.
The Black Rep

On Jan. 14, 1963, Alabama Gov. George Wallace made one of the most indelible speeches in the fight against racial equality ever to be made in the United States.

“In the name of the greatest people that have ever trod this earth, I draw a line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny, and I say, segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever,” Wallace, a Democrat, said at his inauguration.

Linda Kennedy and Alicia Like joined "St. Louis on the Air" to discuss "Miss Julie, Clarissa and John."
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

This week marks the opening of the St. Louis Black Repertory Company’s 40th anniversary season with the Midwest premiere of “Miss Julie, Clarissa & John,” a play by Mark Clayton Southers.

The Black Rep’s founder and producing director Ron Himes, actress Alicia Like and artistic associate Linda Kennedy joined St. Louis on the Air on Friday to discuss the production and the rest of the season. 

Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

Singer-songwriter Donny Hathaway was born in Chicago but grew up in St. Louis. Known for songs like “The Ghetto” and “This Christmas,” Hathaway began singing in his grandmother’s church choir and playing the piano at age 3. Hathaway was a prolific musician but also grappled with mental illness throughout his life.

Detail from the poster for Purlie
The Black Rep website

The musical "Purlie" is a “biting satire” about race relations according to The Black Rep founder Ron Himes. Himes is adamant about the show’s contemporary relevance in view of the Ferguson protests.

“The play deals with civil rights issues; it deals with racial bigotry; it deals with Southern white privilege and a community that is not willing to change and integrate; and that all sounds very familiar,” he said.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: After a two-month search, the St. Louis Black Repertory Company has secured a stage for its 37th season. The theater company will present three of its four 2013-2014 shows at Harris-Stowe State University’s Emerson Performance Center.

Ron Himes
Provided by Mr. Himes

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Much is unknown about the Black Rep’s future after losing its Grandel Theater home at the close of the troupe’s 36th year. But one thing’s for certain, according to Black Rep founder Ron Himes.

“We will have a 37th season,” Himes said.