Roy Blunt

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Republican Senator Roy Blunt took to the Senate floor today to speak out against President Barack Obama’s proposed transportation measure.

Obama has been pressing Congress to pass the transportation part of his stalled jobs bill that provides $50 million for roads and bridges.

The Senate is expected to vote today on whether to take up the measure. Blunt says the bill is a waste of time and will not pass.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Presidential candidates can now register to run in Missouri’s primary next year – and even though the Republican primary won’t count, representatives for GOP presidential hopefuls showed up in Jefferson City Tuesday to register.  Missouri U.S. Senator Roy Blunt filed on behalf of Mitt Romney.

“The campaign decided properly and rightly so that Missouri is an important state, " Blunt said. "The primary is going to happen relatively early in the process, but several states will have voted before us…I think the primary will help set the stage for the caucus.”

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Sen. Claire McCaskill D-Mo., is accusing Senate Republicans of playing politics when they blocked President Obama’s jobs bill.

The president’s plan died yesterday when all 46 Republicans and two Democrats voted against it. Republicans opposed its stimulus-style spending and the tax surcharge for the very wealthy.

In a conference call with reporters Wednesday morning, McCaskill said it’s important that Congress try to set aside the election next year and focus on improving infrastructure and creating jobs.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Sen. Blunt: Obama's plan failed because it doesn't make economic sense

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., says the Senate killed President Barack Obama’s $447 billion jobs plan because it "doesn’t make economic sense to raise taxes on job creators while Americans are looking for work and our nation is facing record debt."

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill says that she wishes she could have attended President’s Barack Obama’s fundraisers in St. Louis Tuesday night, but she had a fundraiser of her own that had been scheduled long before the president’s visit.

Earlier this week, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and other Republican Party officials pointed out that McCaskill and Missouri Governor Jay Nixon, both democrats, would not attend. Nixon did meet the President at the airport and appeared at the downtown fundraiser with Obama.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Obama to visit St. Louis today

Following a speech in Dallas promoting his jobs bill, President Obama will attend two private fundraisers in St. Louis , one at a downtown hotel on behalf of the Democratic National Committee, and the other at the home of Tom Carnahan, the brother of Congressman Russ Carnahan and Secretary of State Robin Carnahan.

Not everyone is pleased with the President's plans. Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri says the President seems to be more focused on campaigning than on solving the nation's problem.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

 The ribbon was cut today on a $68 million federal courthouse in Jefferson City, named for former Missouri Governor and U.S. Senator Kit Bond (R).

 It replaces an older building, which shares space with a post office, and where judges, jurors, lawyers and criminal defendants all shared the same elevator.  Bond says the new facility is sorely needed.

flickr/cliff1066

This week, Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., introduced legislation aimed at cracking down on unfair trade practices and boosting manufacturing jobs in the state.

McCaskill says many Missouri companies have expressed frustration that an increasing number of foreign shippers are using unscrupulous and illegal tactics to avoid paying penalties they owe for illegal trade practices.

She says the legislation will help in pursuing and successfully collecting duties.

Flickr/JimBowen0306

Special legislative session may end unless consensus found in 2 days

Supporters and opponents of the scaled-down tax credit bill spent more than six hours Monday trying to make their respective cases to a Missouri House committee.  Senate leaders slashed $300 million  from the Aerotropolis proposal before passing it, and say that the Compete Missouri provision in the bill can more than make up for the deleted warehouse incentives. 

David Kerr, who heads the state's Economic Development department, testified in favor of the bill.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Updated 4:31 p.m. with bill passing in the Senate

The Senate has approved a $7 billion bill to replenish nearly empty federal disaster aid accounts. The vote was 62-37.

The legislation still faces opposition from Republicans controlling the House. They promise action on a competing plan in the House next week that would provide $3.7 billion in disaster aid.

The House measure is attached to a bill needed to avert a government shutdown, and that may give Republicans an edge in the partisan dispute.

St. Louis Public Radio

President Barack Obama will be in a challenging position Thurs. night as he presents his jobs plan to a joint session of Congress, according to Mo. Sen. Claire McCaskill.

In a conference call with reporters Wed., McCaskill said most Missourians want Congress to cut spending, but it will be difficult for the federal government to embark on a giant jobs programs without spending money.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Reporting from KRCU's Jacob McCleland was used in this report.

Army Corps of Engineers officials and Mississippi County farmers met with Senator Roy Blunt Thursday to discuss the restoration of the Birds Point-New Madrid floodway.

The Corps is currently building a temporary levee to 51 feet - more than eleven feet lower than the original levee that was detonated in May to relieve massive flooding on the Mississippi River.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Governor Jay Nixon (D) and nearly half of Missouri’s congressional delegation are pledging to rebuild levees and pursue policies that will make massive water releases from dams unnecessary in the future.

They addressed this issue at a meeting of Missouri Farm Bureau members at the State Fair in Sedalia today.

(Via Flickr/USACEPublicAffairs/Photo by Maj. Gen. David Sprynczynatyk)

Senators from states lining the Missouri River are asking the Army Corps of Engineers to outline plans for next year's flood preparations.

The senators say in a letter sent to top Corps officials on Monday that the agency must learn from this year's devastating flood season and apply those lessons to next year's plan.

The delegation is also asking what authority the Corps has to make changes to its annual operating plan for the river, and whether any additional authority will be needed.

(St. Louis Public Radio/UPI)

 Both of Missouri’s U.S. senators today supported the emergency bill that averts a first-ever government default. The measure, which was the source of months of contentious and partisan debate, raises the nation’s debt ceiling. Republican Senator Roy Blunt says he voted for the bill because it’s a good first step to rein in federal spending.

(St. Louis Public Radio/UPI)

Senator Claire McCaskill of Missouri says Republicans need to offer more compromise regarding a plan on how to handle raising the debt ceiling.

McCaskill says Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid's proposal includes spending cuts larger than the rise in the debt ceiling and no increased taxes.

She says those were the requirements Speaker of the House John Boehner put forward at the start of the debate. But he has come up with his own plan that McCaskill says is similar, but with a catch.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

According to Mo. Sen. Roy Blunt the bipartisan “Gang of Six” plan to raise the debt ceiling and cut the deficit by $4 trillion is too complicated to agree on by the Aug. 2 deadline set by the Obama administration.

Speaking with reporters during a weekly conference call, Blunt said he might support a short- term solution to raise the debt limit in order to allow time for a broader plan to be implemented.

(flickr/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by Carlos J. Lazo)

The Missouri River Working Group is holding its first meeting on Wednesday to come up with a policy on flood control.

Missouri Senators Roy Blunt and Claire McCaskill launched the group with senators from North Dakota to look for ways to improve flood control along the Missouri River and keep this year’s flooding from happening again.

flickr/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers photo by Carlos J. Lazo

The Missouri River Working Group will hold its first meeting next week to discuss issues related to flood control.

Missouri Senators Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt, along with senators from states along the Missouri River, launched the group to examine the best ways to protect people and property. They’ll also discuss ways to avoid floods, like this summer’s, from happening in the future.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill says she and her colleagues will take a close look at the way the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is managing the Missouri River at the end of the flooding season.

Rising waters have already forced evacuations in the Dakotas and Iowa. The floods are due partly to the release of water from huge reservoirs located near the headwaters of the river.

McCaskill says every year, there are questions about the Corps' decision. But overall, she says the agency has done the right things this year.

(via Flickr/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers/Carlos J. Lazo)

Mo. Republican Roy Blunt says he's carefully watching a wave of water that will make its way down the Missouri River over the next few days and is already forcing evacuations in Iowa.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (R-Missouri) wants the federal government to pay 100 percent of the cleanup costs from the Joplin tornado.

The federal government typically covers 75 percent of the costs of responding to disasters, with state and local governments picking up the rest. But Blunt says he has asked Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano to pick up more than that in Joplin’s case.

Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill calls comments by the number two Republican in the House about the disaster relief funds for Joplin "wildly inappropriate."

House Major Leader Eric Cantor, a Republican from Virginia, said Monday that if Congress passes an emergency spending bill to help the tornado victims, money will have to be cut from somewhere else.

McCaskill says disaster relief is an important federal function.

Updated 2:15 p.m. May 2 with information from conference call with Sen. Blunt

From Senator Roy Blunt:

"Osama bin Laden's death is a major victory for America. This development is the culmination of the sacrifices and dedication from our brave troops and intelligence professionals. After nearly a decade, it also brings a great measure of justice and closure for all Americans who lost loved ones as a result of the brutal attacks against our nation on 9/11. While this does not mean the end of our fight against global terrorism, bin Laden's death is a major blow to al-Qaeda and the terrorist organizations he financed."

In a Monday conference call, Blunt praised the president for sending Special Forces into bin Laden's Pakistani compound, rather than conducting a bombing raid.

(UPI/St. Louis Public Radio)

Congressional budget talks appear headed in a positive direction today, but conservative spending cuts remain obstacles as Congress seeks to avert a government shutdown this weekend.

Missouri Republican Senator Roy Blunt continued to heap blame on Democrats for not passing a budget last year.

"They could have resolved them any way they wanted to last year,” Blunt said. “So their negotiating position is dramatically impacted by their unwillingness to deal with these issues when they were totally in control of everything."

(via Wikimedia Commons/United States Senate)

Reporting from Illinois Public Radio's Luke Runyon used in this report.

U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk says Libyan rebels should be given weapons to help them quickly overthrow Moammar Gadhafi's regime.

The Illinois Republican says furnishing weapons will help end the Libyan war and limit costs for the United States and its allies. 

Kirk spoke with reporters Friday. He says the conflict in Libya needs to be finished quickly. 

(St. Louis Public Radio/UPI)

Via two conference calls today, Missouri's Senators shared their opinions on the continuing situation in Libya.

Democrat Claire McCaskill says she's concerned about conditions in Libya.

While the Senator is awaiting briefings from military officials, she says it appears there has been a reversal over the last 24 hours.

McCaskill says the U.S. effort must have a clear timeline.

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Despite the ongoing danger of nuclear reactor meltdowns in Japan, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri says plans for new facilities should continue in this country.

Workers in Japan are trying to cool overheating reactors damaged by last week's earthquake and tsunami. Blunt says earthquakes would likely not cause similar problems at any nuclear facility in the U.S., including Missouri's lone reactor in Callaway County.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri is blaming the current federal budget deadlock on the last Congress.

The Senate on Wednesday rejected a budget proposal approved by the Republican-controlled House, as well as an alternative favored by Democrats. Blunt, a Republican from Springfield, says the new Congress did not create this environment; the previous one, controlled by Democrats, did.

Missouri's U.S. Senators have sent a joint letter to President Obama urging the president to grant Governor Jay Nixon's request to declare 64 Missouri counties federal disaster areas after this winter's heavy snowfall.

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