Roy Blunt

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

U.S. Senate Candidate Todd Akin is dismissing the controversy over his use of the word “ladylike” to describe his opponent, Claire McCaskill.

Referring to the first debate between the two candidates Akin said that McCaskill wasn’t behaving as “ladylike” as she did in her first campaign for Senate in 2006.

McCaskill rebuked Akin’s choice of words during an interview on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, saying that she is once again "at a loss" to describe Todd Akin.

(St. Louis Public Radio/UPI)

Republican United States Senator Roy Blunt criticized President Obama's response to the attacks on embassies in Egypt and Libya. In the Libyan attacks, four embassy employees were killed, including U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens. Allegedly, the attacks were in response to a film that ridiculed Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Jobless rate drops below 8 percent in St. Louis

The jobless rate in metropolitan St. Louis is going down, and has dipped below 8 percent for the first time in more than three years.

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo.
Gage Skidmore | Flickr

Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt is applauding the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s move to designate all of Missouri’s 114 counties a disaster area.

Speaking to reporters today, Blunt said the state’s ongoing drought highlights the need for good farm policy and he would like the House to pass a final farm bill by the end of September.

Malory Ensor/KOMU News - via Flickr

Both of Missouri’s Senators have signed a letter asking agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack to declare almost all of the state a disaster area due to drought conditions.

The federal Farm Service Agency recently found that every county except St. Louis city met the requirements for that declaration. It would open up emergency loans and expand the places where ranchers can graze their cattle.

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Missouri's no-call list set to expand

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon will be in St. Louis today to sign legislation that allows people to add cellphones to the state’s Do Not Call list.

Nixon created the list when he was attorney general. Cellphone numbers added to the list would be off limits to most solicitations, including text messages.

Attorney General Chris Koster, whose office maintains the list, is expected to join Nixon. Koster says his office gets nearly 200 complaints a week from cellphone users about unwanted telemarketing calls.

(Combined photos - both by UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The Paycheck Fairness Act, which proponents say would strengthen women's ability to get equal pay in the workplace, failed a procedural vote in the U.S. Senate on Tuesday. Just like yesterday's vote, Missouri's senators are sharply split along party lines.

Missouri's Republican senator Roy Bunt says the bill doesn't have much to do with "fair pay" and a whole lot to do with litigation.

Blunt says student loan debate is red herring

May 9, 2012
(via Flickr/Senator Roy Blunt)

Missouri’s Republican Senator says he’ll continue his opposition to a plan put forth by Democrats to extend federal subsidies for student loans for another year.

Roy Blunt says an alternative plan would accomplish the same goal, without raising the deficit.  Blunt says he supports freezing student loan interest rates where they are now, at 3.4 percent, but says he would pay for the subsidy by taking the money from part of the President’s 2010 healthcare overhaul— which he claims is partially funded by interest payments from student loans.

(via Flickr/Senator Roy Blunt)

Missouri U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (R) briefly addressed the Missouri House today.

Blunt spent most of his nine-minute speech criticizing government growth and overregulation.  He was especially critical of the federal government’s attempts to regulate family farms.

"We don’t need people in Washington DC deciding what farm kids can do on family farms," Blunt said to applause.  "We don’t need the EPA trying to spend all this time figuring out how you can farm without dust.”

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Court approves $1.5 million settlement with former US Fidelis employees

More than 550 former employees of the auto services contract giant US  Fidelis will share in a nearly one point five million dollar settlement reached in bankruptcycourt.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Wednesday’s deal settles claims by the workers that they were not properly warned before being laid off.

Joseph Leahy/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Senator Roy Blunt says he expects most of his fellow Republican congressman will be lining up behind GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney by the end of the month. 

Senator Blunt was handpicked by Romney to garner endorsements for the former Massachusetts governor from his fellow Republican congressmen. He says his task is coming to a close.

With Romney’s primary sweep in Wisconsin, Maryland and Washington, DC this week, Blunt said he expects most GOP lawmakers to make up their minds in the next 30 days.  

(via Flickr/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

Army Corps. seeks dismissal of lawsuit filed on behalf of southeast Mo. farmers

More than 140 southeast Missouri farmers are seeking damage caused by last year's intentional breach of the Birds Point levee at the height of spring flooding.

The Southeast Missourian reports that government attorneys filed a motion to dismiss the suit in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. Oral arguments in the suit are scheduled to begin April 10 in Washington.

(via Flickr/Senator Roy Blunt)

Missouri Senator Roy Blunt is one of the Republicans blaming President Obama for gas prices that have reached close to $4 per gallon, saying his rejection of the Keystone pipeline hurt the economy.

Obama is defending his energy policies in Oklahoma today, pointing to plans to fast-track an oil pipeline from Oklahoma to Texas that emerged after he delayed the larger Keystone XL pipeline earlier this year.

Even so, Blunt says the president continues to obstruct progress.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri Senator Roy Blunt says oil refineries continue to push back on his amendment to the highway bill. The so-called “Boutique Fuels Amendment,” introduced last month, would relax requirements on special blends of gas that are used in different states and cities.

Blunt says the amendment would lower gas prices.

During a conference call with reporters this morning, Blunt said the refineries that were not profit centers for the oil companies before the Clean Air Act now are.

The Senate has turned back an attempt to kill President Obama's new rules requiring most health insurance plans to provide contraceptives without additional cost.

The 51-48 vote against an amendment to an unrelated highway bill (Yes, that's just how the Senate works) was mostly along party lines.

(via Flickr/Senator Blunt)

Missouri Senator Roy Blunt says the race for the Republican presidential nomination could still be in play in March when Missouri holds its caucus. But before that, Missouri will hold a meaningless presidential primary on Feb. 7.

Blunt, a Republican, says at a time when the state is trying to save money, a primary that has no binding impact should have been eliminated.

"But we're going to have it," Blunt said. "And that February primary may give some guidance to people going to the March caucuses."

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo.
Gage Skidmore | Flickr

Updated 10:30 a.m.

Updated 4 p.m. with comments from local cardiologist and correcting canceled to postponed.

Republican U.S. Senator Roy Blunt says he's looking "forward to returning to [his] regular schedule very soon" after having a coronary stent implanted on Thursday.

(UPI/Rick Meyer)

Missouri has received another $47 million in federal grants to help cover the costs of natural disasters that pounded the state over the summer.

The grants, announced today by Republican senator Roy Blunt, include:

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Nixon wants Mo. universities to consider tapping into reserves to plug hole in budget

Gov. Jay Nixon wants five Missouri universities to consider tapping their reserves  and provide funding to the state's higher education system. Nixon's proposal would call for the universities to provide the state $107 million from their reserves. The state would use that money to help avoid deep funding cuts to Missouri's public colleges and universities. The state would repay the schools over seven years with money from the Missouri Higher Education Loan Authority.

(via Flickr/Senator Blunt)

Missouri Senator Roy Blunt says the failure of two balanced-budget amendments today shows Senate Democrats aren’t serious about dealing with the deficit.

The defeat of both bills – one from Democrats, one from Republicans – ends the current push to force a yearly balanced budget from Congress.  Blunt, who voted for the Republican-backed bill, says the fact that neither party could pass their amendment speaks to the heart of the Senate’s disfunction. 

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo.
Senator Blunt | Flickr

Updated 6:10 p.m. with reporting from the St. Louis Beacon's Rob Koenig.

Overcoming a late surge of tea party backing for his opponent, U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., was elected to the No. 5 Senate leadership post Tuesday in a close vote that pitted an experienced GOP leader against an "outsider" businessman.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

The effort to upgrade the grounds of the Gateway Arch is getting a boost from the federal government - a $20 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The agency planning the project, CityArchRiver 2015 Foundation, announced Monday that the grant will pay for roadway improvements along Interstate 70 near the site of the Arch, including a pedestrian land bridge over I-70 connecting the Old Courthouse, Luther Ely Smith Square and the Arch grounds.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Senator Roy Blunt says he voted to lift a ban on funding horse meat inspections.

Congress cut off funding for horse meat inspections in 2006, but lifted the ban earlier this month (November) after a federal report found more horses had been neglected and abandoned since the economic downturn began.

Blunt says the elimination of the potential for horse slaughter has ruined the horse market.

(Combined photos - both by UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Sen. Claire McCaskill, (D-Mo.) says she’s cautiously optimistic that management problems at Arlington National Cemetery have been solved.

The democratic senator visited the cemetery on Friday to assess changes made there following the revelation that thousands of graves were mislabeled or unmarked.

McCaskill co-sponsored a law that requires congressional oversight of the burial grounds, and requires cemetery officials to submit a grave site analysis. She says that report will be delivered December 22nd and so far, is 86 percent complete.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Missouri Republican Senator Roy Blunt took to the Senate floor today to speak out against President Barack Obama’s proposed transportation measure.

Obama has been pressing Congress to pass the transportation part of his stalled jobs bill that provides $50 million for roads and bridges.

The Senate is expected to vote today on whether to take up the measure. Blunt says the bill is a waste of time and will not pass.

(Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio)

Presidential candidates can now register to run in Missouri’s primary next year – and even though the Republican primary won’t count, representatives for GOP presidential hopefuls showed up in Jefferson City Tuesday to register.  Missouri U.S. Senator Roy Blunt filed on behalf of Mitt Romney.

“The campaign decided properly and rightly so that Missouri is an important state, " Blunt said. "The primary is going to happen relatively early in the process, but several states will have voted before us…I think the primary will help set the stage for the caucus.”

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Sen. Claire McCaskill D-Mo., is accusing Senate Republicans of playing politics when they blocked President Obama’s jobs bill.

The president’s plan died yesterday when all 46 Republicans and two Democrats voted against it. Republicans opposed its stimulus-style spending and the tax surcharge for the very wealthy.

In a conference call with reporters Wednesday morning, McCaskill said it’s important that Congress try to set aside the election next year and focus on improving infrastructure and creating jobs.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Sen. Blunt: Obama's plan failed because it doesn't make economic sense

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., says the Senate killed President Barack Obama’s $447 billion jobs plan because it "doesn’t make economic sense to raise taxes on job creators while Americans are looking for work and our nation is facing record debt."

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill says that she wishes she could have attended President’s Barack Obama’s fundraisers in St. Louis Tuesday night, but she had a fundraiser of her own that had been scheduled long before the president’s visit.

Earlier this week, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., and other Republican Party officials pointed out that McCaskill and Missouri Governor Jay Nixon, both democrats, would not attend. Nixon did meet the President at the airport and appeared at the downtown fundraiser with Obama.

UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Obama to visit St. Louis today

Following a speech in Dallas promoting his jobs bill, President Obama will attend two private fundraisers in St. Louis , one at a downtown hotel on behalf of the Democratic National Committee, and the other at the home of Tom Carnahan, the brother of Congressman Russ Carnahan and Secretary of State Robin Carnahan.

Not everyone is pleased with the President's plans. Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri says the President seems to be more focused on campaigning than on solving the nation's problem.

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