Roy Blunt

Updated 2:15 p.m. May 2 with information from conference call with Sen. Blunt

From Senator Roy Blunt:

"Osama bin Laden's death is a major victory for America. This development is the culmination of the sacrifices and dedication from our brave troops and intelligence professionals. After nearly a decade, it also brings a great measure of justice and closure for all Americans who lost loved ones as a result of the brutal attacks against our nation on 9/11. While this does not mean the end of our fight against global terrorism, bin Laden's death is a major blow to al-Qaeda and the terrorist organizations he financed."

In a Monday conference call, Blunt praised the president for sending Special Forces into bin Laden's Pakistani compound, rather than conducting a bombing raid.

(UPI/St. Louis Public Radio)

Congressional budget talks appear headed in a positive direction today, but conservative spending cuts remain obstacles as Congress seeks to avert a government shutdown this weekend.

Missouri Republican Senator Roy Blunt continued to heap blame on Democrats for not passing a budget last year.

"They could have resolved them any way they wanted to last year,” Blunt said. “So their negotiating position is dramatically impacted by their unwillingness to deal with these issues when they were totally in control of everything."

(via Wikimedia Commons/United States Senate)

Reporting from Illinois Public Radio's Luke Runyon used in this report.

U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk says Libyan rebels should be given weapons to help them quickly overthrow Moammar Gadhafi's regime.

The Illinois Republican says furnishing weapons will help end the Libyan war and limit costs for the United States and its allies. 

Kirk spoke with reporters Friday. He says the conflict in Libya needs to be finished quickly. 

(St. Louis Public Radio/UPI)

Via two conference calls today, Missouri's Senators shared their opinions on the continuing situation in Libya.

Democrat Claire McCaskill says she's concerned about conditions in Libya.

While the Senator is awaiting briefings from military officials, she says it appears there has been a reversal over the last 24 hours.

McCaskill says the U.S. effort must have a clear timeline.

Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo.
Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Despite the ongoing danger of nuclear reactor meltdowns in Japan, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri says plans for new facilities should continue in this country.

Workers in Japan are trying to cool overheating reactors damaged by last week's earthquake and tsunami. Blunt says earthquakes would likely not cause similar problems at any nuclear facility in the U.S., including Missouri's lone reactor in Callaway County.

(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri is blaming the current federal budget deadlock on the last Congress.

The Senate on Wednesday rejected a budget proposal approved by the Republican-controlled House, as well as an alternative favored by Democrats. Blunt, a Republican from Springfield, says the new Congress did not create this environment; the previous one, controlled by Democrats, did.

Missouri's U.S. Senators have sent a joint letter to President Obama urging the president to grant Governor Jay Nixon's request to declare 64 Missouri counties federal disaster areas after this winter's heavy snowfall.

(Bill Greenblatt/UPI)

The U.S. Senate announced today that it will accept a bill from the House to fund government for an additional two weeks, averting a government shutdown on Friday.

The House had proposed a budget which cut $60 billion in federal spending, which Senate Democrats complained was too much.

Siding with his former House colleagues, Missouri Senator Roy Blunt said he sees little room for compromise when it comes to reducing the deficit.

EPA Regional Administrator Karl Brooks says the federal government is confident Ameren Missouri violated the Clean Air Act at its Rush Island power plant near Festus.

Brooks was responding to a letter sent to the EPA last month by Senator Roy Blunt.

In the letter, Blunt defended Ameren and accused the EPA of overreaching its authority in order to “broadly penalize the use of coal in the United States.”

Hartzler campaign

Missouri's newest members of the U.S. House have continued raising money.

Federal campaign finance reports show Republican Billy Long of Springfield raised roughly $15,000 from Nov. 23 to Dec. 31, 2010. Long reported starting 2011 with $29,000 in his campaign bank account.

Missouri's Senators Claire McCaskill and Roy Blunt agree that the president's proposal to cut the deficit does not go far enough.

President Barack Obama proposed a freeze in spending in his State of the Union speech last night.

McCaskill, a Democrat, says the president's spending cuts don't go far enough:

With the departure of Kit Bond, Missouri has both a new senior senator, Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill, and a new junior senator, Republican Roy Blunt. 

Blunt took his oath with vice president Joe Biden today to make it official.

Roy Blunt, now the GOP nominee for the U.S. Senate, and U.S. House colleague Todd Akin were both swift today to assert that July's jobs figures make clear that A) the federal stimulus spending hasn't worked and B) the Bush tax cuts can't be allowed to expire.

Blunt, R-Springfield, has been highlighting his "Where are the Jobs?" slogan -- with signs as well as talk -- ever since his victory party Tuesday night in south St. Louis.

U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., campaigned here Saturday on behalf of GOP colleague Roy Blunt's U.S. Senate campaign via Skype, and not in person, after she was hospitalized with an undisclosed illness.

The fundraising event that she was supposed to headline for Blunt has been postponed, said a spokesman for the Springfield, Mo., congressman who is competing Tuesday against eight lesser-known rivals in the state's Republican primary.

Despite the furor, some area Tea Party activists say they're not budging from their objections to U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann's decision to campaign here Saturday for U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt's bid for the U.S. Senate.

"Whenever she endorses, she's taking our name with her," said Jeannine Husky, with the Eureka Tea Party, referring to Bachmann's new "Tea Party Caucus" of members of Congress.

Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan renewed her attacks today on her best-known Republican rival for the U.S. Senate -- U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt -- by touting him as part of the "culture of corruption in Washington" that she says is hurting average Missourians and small businesses.

Her backdrop was Lubeley's Bakery in Marlborough, where dozens of South County Democrats munched on cookies while Carnahan attempted to crumble Blunt's character.

Happy over his continued edge in the polls, U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt celebrated Sunday with St. Louis Republicans in what he declared was his 560th campaign event in Missouri since launching his bid for the U.S. Senate.

Blunt, R-Springfield, highlighted some of his key themes as he energized city Republicans at their annual picnic at Carondelet Park by taking on national Democrats and his expected target this fall, Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan.

Missouri Secretary of State Robin Carnahan, the best-known Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, has just proposed three general-election debates for after the Aug. 3 primary.

The catch is that Carnahan is calling for the debates to feature the nominees from not just the two major parties but also the Constitution and Libertarian parties, which have automatic ballot access in Missouri. (Any other parties have to collect a certain number of signatures to get their candidates on the November ballot in the state.)

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