Rural Health | St. Louis Public Radio

Rural Health

At the start of the year, Missouri was sitting on $80 million. The money was set aside in case the Children’s Health Insurance Program wasn’t refunded by the federal government. In late January, Missouri was caught by surprise when CHIP was refunded.


This story was originally published February 6. It has been updated as of February 9 at 1 pm.

The Atchison-Holt Ambulance District spans two counties and 1,100 square miles in the far northwest corner of Missouri. The EMTs who drive these ambulances cover nearly 10 times more land area than their counterparts in Omaha, the nearest major city. 

An illustration of pills.
Illustration by Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

White residents in Missouri are dying at a higher rate than they did nearly two decades ago, according to a report from the Missouri Foundation for Health.

The increased death rate largely is occurring in the state's rural counties, especially in the Ozarks and the Bootheel region and substance abuse appears to be a major factor. For example, deaths by drug overdose have increased by nearly 600 percent in many rural counties. Poor mental health also plays a significant role, as suicides among young and middle-aged adults have increased by 30 percent since 1995. 

When the hospital closed in rural Ellington, Missouri, a town of about 1,000, the community lost its only emergency room, too. 

That was 2016. That same year, a local farmer had a heart attack.


After 20 years of selling and using meth, 38-year-old Andy Moss turned his life around. He got off drugs and got a good job. Next step: he wanted to fix his teeth, which had disintegrated, leaving nerves exposed.


Access to mental health care a challenge for rural areas

Mar 26, 2015
Jonathan Bailey | NIH

Every day, LaDonna Haley talks to patients who can’t find a psychiatrist or counselor who takes new clients in the St. Louis area. She estimates that 10 percent of those callers live in a rural county.

Medical program is a pipeline to rural practice

Jan 27, 2012

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Jan. 27, 2012 - At first, it sounds like a put-down when Dr. Angela Whitesell describes Lockwood, Mo., the place where she grew up. "It's a town in the middle of nowhere," she says, "and an hour away from everything." It soon becomes clear that her tone is reverential, another way of saying she was so "emotionally connected to the land" that she felt good about deciding to return home a few years ago to establish her medical practice.