Safety

Toya Williams of St. Louis picked up a gun lock at the National Council of Jewish Women's Back-to-School Store Sunday, July 24, 2016. She said she liked the suggestion to wear the key around her neck.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri state representative from St. Louis County is launching a coalition to prevent the shooting deaths of children who find a loaded weapon in the home. The Children’s Firearm Safety Alliance will work with Washington University researchers to build a database tracking accidental shootings nationwide.

“First of all, you need to know what the numbers are. You need to know what the incidents are. We also need to know if adults are charged with anything in their states,” said Rep. Stacey Newman, D-Richmond Heights.

At least 95 children in the United States have been shot and killed accidentally so far this year, according to the database.

Mass of cars in a parking lot, lined up under the hot sun.
ANGELA N | FLICKR

Sitting in a hot car can be uncomfortable for adults — but for children it can be deadly. A law Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon signed this month by aims to keep kids from that danger.  

The bill, HB 1649, protects individuals from property damage charges when they break into hot cars to save children. The bill stipulates that a person must first contact emergency responders before entering the vehicle. They also must reasonably believe that entering the car is necessary to help the child.

Ka'Milla McMiller is an organizer with the Missouri Gay Straight Alliance Network.
Carolina Hidalgo / St. Louis Public Radio

What’s it like to live in fear, every day?  To know you’re a target just by being yourself? To understand that being attractive could kill you?

Ka’Milla McMiller of south St. Louis knows. As a young transgender woman of color, she can’t stop thinking about her safety, especially after what happened last year.

Davion Thompson, 14, clocks the speed of cars passing the intersection of Gasconade Street and Compton Avenue Saturday, Oct 10, 2015 during Trailnet's traffic calming demo.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Brightly-colored tires simulating flower beds popped-up along a two-block stretch of Gasconade Street Saturday in the Dutchtown neighborhood of south St. Louis.

Bicycle and pedestrian advocacy group Trailnet set the tires up to block the corners of intersections leading up to Marquette Park, shortening the distance people crossing the road were exposed to traffic. Other tires formed a zig-zag route for drivers to navigate.

Mayor Francis Slay announces an initiative to increase the diversity of the public safety department
UPI/Bill Greenblatt

Updated at 4:30 p.m. Jan. 20 with approval of money.

The Board of Estimate and Apportionment approved $39,000 of the proposed $50,000 for the minority recruitment program. An additional $11,000 may be available next fiscal year. The city and the Ethical Society of Police must still sign a contract outlining the details.

The grant comes as the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department faces a federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission complaint over its promotion policies. The St. Louis Fire Department has faced several lawsuits over the same issue.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: WASHINGTON - When two freight trains collided in southeast Missouri last month, the crash injured seven people, collapsed part of a highway overpass used by 500 cars a day, and caused $11 million in damages. (See: KSDK report with video)

That train collision near Chaffee, Mo., also spurred a federal safety investigation and was one of the topics of a U.S. Senate hearing on Wednesday into rail safety issues.

(via Flickr/ Drewwh)

Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed two traffic safety measures Monday. Quinn said in a press release that the new laws are “common sense measures that will help all motorists in Illinois arrive at their destinations safely.”

(via Flickr/Mykl Roventine)

Officials with the Missouri and Illinois Departments of Transportation are joining efforts to highlight Work Zone Safety Week, which begins today and runs through Friday.

With the start of spring in St. Louis, crews will be increasing construction efforts, patching potholes and resurfacing roads.

Ed Hassinger is district engineer with MoDOT. He says last year in St. Louis there were 2,500 accidents in work zones and eight people died.