Saint Louis Art Museum

St. Louis Art Museum East Building
Jacob Sharp/Image courtesy of the Saint Louis Art Museum and Architectural Wall Systems

St. Louis Art Museum board member Barbara Taylor and her husband Andrew Taylor, executive chairman of Enterprise Holdings, Inc., recently donated $5 million dollars for a new sculpture garden at the museum. Carl Ham, head of development for the museum, praised the Taylors for their foresight and said the gift would fund both construction and an endowment for maintenance.

“It’s the rare exception and real benefit to organizations when people like the Taylors make a gift that makes possible both,” Ham said.

Flickr | ChrisYunker

Three years after her death, Edith Spink, Ladue's longest serving mayor, continues to shape the area's culture.

Tuesday the St. Louis Art Museum announced a bequest of 225 artworks from her and her husband, Charles Claude Johnson Spink, the onetime publisher of the national sports paper "The Sporting News."

The gift, which is valued at more than $50 million, includes work by famed American painters Norman Rockwell and Andrew Wyeth as well as Chinese and Japanese jade, bronze and porcelain pieces valued at more than $5 million apiece. 

Nick Cave's Soundsuits are assembled from objects found throughout the country
Willis Arnold/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri-born artist Nick Cave's Soundsuits are known for vibrant colors and incorporating found objects as costume. The suits straddle the line between dance costume and soft sculpture. This weekend the St. Louis Art Museum opens Currents 109: Nick Cave, a multimedia solo show presenting Soundsuits, video, and additional work. Cave spoke with St. Louis Public Radio's Willis Ryder Arnold about his work as social commentary and creative influences.

Courtesy of the Saint Louis Art Museum

The Saint Louis Art Museum's "Atua: Sacred Gods From Polynesia" exhibition takes a closer look at sculpture and religion, but it's not the first time the museum has explored art from the region.

"The museum's been collecting Pacific art since the 1900s," said Nichole Bridges, associate curator in charge of the arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas at the museum. "Most of the permanent Pacific arts collection comes from Melanesia; we have very little that comes from Polynesia. This is a nice complement to our collection."

Work by Edo Rosenblith
Provided by Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis

First – remember First Friday. The tradition of art galleries being open in the evening on that date is well established in Grand Center and spreading. For instance, Space at 4168 Manchester, will be opening "Visions of a city: A solo exhibit" by Timothy Wagner from 6-9 p.m.

Flickr | ChrisYunker

The St. Louis Art Museum is facing a possible deficit of $9 million as a result of an unfunded liability in the city’s Employees Retirement System (ERS). That amount is nearly one-third of the museum’s $29 million 2014 budget.

via Wikimedia Commons

For its contribution to the 250th anniversary of St. Louis, the St. Louis Art Museum is planning an exhibition showcasing the influence of Louis IX on the world of art. Louis IX, also known as St. Louis, is the city’s namesake.

At the heart of the exhibit will be a folio out of a picture Bible on loan from the Morgan Library in New York.

“We believe that the king, Louis IX, actually commissioned this Bible,” said St. Louis Art Museum curator Judy Mann.  “It is of such outstanding quality it had to have been a royal commission.”

via Wikimedia Commons

How did a French king born in 1214 become the namesake of a city founded in the heart of the Americas 550 years later? The answer is woven into the fabric of St. Louis’ identity even now, as we celebrate the 250th anniversary of the city’s founding.

Friday marks the 800th anniversary of the birth of the city’s namesake: Louis IX, the only French king to become a saint.

A new exhibit by installation artist Won Ju Lim opened Friday, April 11 at the Saint Louis Art Museum. A mix of sculpture, photography, film and drawings, her exhibition “Currents 108: Raycraft is Dead” is an exploration of privacy and paranoia that was inspired by personal experience with a nosy neighbor.

Lim was an architect before she became an artist, and her work reflects a continued fascination with the field, particularly the psychology of space.  As an artist she is not limited by practicalities such as building codes and can instead focus on broader ideas.

Philadelphia Museum of Art, John G. Johnson Collection, 1917, Cat. 1050

For the next four months, the East Building of the Saint Louis Art Museum is home to a major exhibition on the changing French identity during the 19th century, as shown through paintings, photography and travel objects of the time.

“Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet” is curated by Simon Kelly of the Saint Louis Art Museum and April M. Watson of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City. 

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