Saint Louis Science Center

"Journey to Space" Director, Mark Krenzien
Saint Louis Science Center

St. Louis has played a key role in space travel. In 1959, NASA selected St. Louis company McDonnell Aircraft to build America’s first human-controlled spacecraft for Project Mercury. McDonnell Aircraft later became McDonnell Douglas, and merged with Boeing in 1997.

Boeing is one of the corporate sponsors of the Omnimax film, "Journey to Space," directed by Mark Krenzien.

“It’s a special place here in St. Louis, to have a film like this in a town so linked to aerospace and aviation,” Krenzien told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh.

St. Louis Science Center
St. Louis Science Center

Like most kids, Diamond Williams toyed with several potential careers. Cosmetology had potential. So did following in the footsteps of her father, a dialysis technician, but her squeamishness cut short those dreams. Instead, Williams is now an engineer, a career path she discovered through a St. Louis Science Center youth program.

Youth Exploring Science works with St. Louis teens to create projects centered around science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM.

Urban Chestnut Brewmaster and co-founder Florian Kuplent, 40.
Willis Ryder Arnold/St. Louis Public Radio

You might think most brewers start making beer because of the taste, and while that’s true, two local brewers were equally charmed by the science behind making beer. Urban Chestnut co-founder and Brewmaster Florian Kuplent said scientific analysis makes a better beer.

“We do a lot of chemical analysis, we analyze the bitterness, we look at yeast cell count, we look at PH (so, acidity of the beer) we look at how much alcohol is in the beer, how much sugar, kind of a portfolio of standard tests we do for every batch,” said Kuplent.

The game's afoot, this time at the Saint Louis Science Center.

“The International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes” brings Arthur Conan Doyle’s brilliant detective to St. Louis, nearly 130 years after he was created, and lets science center patrons test their powers of observation and crime-solving skills.

meeting with science center
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

The controversy over a contract between the St. Louis Science Center and a design firm doesn’t seem to be going away.

In April, Zoo-Museum District board member Pat Whitaker resigned following conflict-of-interest allegations stemming from the Science Center awarding a contract to Arcturis, a company she founded.

On Thursday, ZMD board member Charles Valier again criticized Science Center dealings with the firm at a budget-presentation meeting at the Center.

imges from zoo museum district entities
File photos and Wikipedia

The very existence of St. Louis’ Zoo-Museum District could be at stake in a debate over its ethics code, according to a national expert on tax funding and cultural districts.

imges from zoo museum district entities
File photos and Wikipedia

New Zoo-Museum District board member Pat Whitaker resigned this afternoon following allegations of ethics violations.

Whitaker is chairman of St. Louis’ Arcturis design firm, which recently won a contract with the St. Louis Science Center. The Science Center is a subdistrict of the ZMD and receives about $10 million each year in tax dollars from the district. She had resigned as an employee of Arcturis, but still owns 37 percent of its stock.

Jeremy Bailey/St. Louis Public Radio

"Harry's Big Adventure: My Bug World" opens October 19th at the Saint Louis Science Center. As a tasty addition, every weekend the attraction will host bug chefs preparing sweet, salty and crunchy bug treats. Cityscape host Steve Potter previewed the exhibit with Bug Chef Jayme Necaise and sampled an array of those bug-filled snacks.

Saint Louis Science Center

The Saint Louis Science Center’s current exhibition Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science has sparked an interest in the afterlife in ancient Egyptian culture.  Earlier this month, Michele Loyet, Adjunct Professor on Near Eastern and Egyptian Archaeology  at Webster University, spoke at the Science Center on the topic of mummification in Egypt.  She was Don Marsh’s guest on St. Louis on the Air to talk about the afterlife tradition in ancient Egypt.

(Kristi Luther/St. Louis Public Radio)

After 17 years, the giant, inflated event and exhibition space at the Saint Louis Science Center known as the "Exploradome" has come down.

What started as an experiment to test the need for such a space, the Exploradome was deflated on Monday to make way for a permanent exhibition structure with indoor and outdoor elements. The Science Center says the dome took just over 9 minutes to deflate.

Here's a time lapse of the deflation:

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