Saint Louis University

Courtesy Tim Campion

Updated 1:20 p.m. August 1 with reopening of smelter

The Doe Run Peru smelter in La Oroya, which had been clsoed due to financial and environmental compliance issues since 2009, resumed zinc processing operations over the weekend.

Peru's Minister of Energy and Mines, Jorge Merino Tafur, is reported to have said that lead smelting would also resume in the not too distant future. Restarting copper production would likely take longer, since that would require building a plant to control sulfuric acid emissions.

Doe Run Peru is owned by the Renco Group, which also owns the St. Louis-based Doe Run Resources Corporation. The metal smelting companies in Missouri and Peru have operated independently since 2007.

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

SLU researchers study meningitis vaccine

Saint Louis University scientists are conducting a clinical trial of a vaccine for the last remaining strain of meningitis without a vaccine.

The university is recruiting children ages 10 to 12 to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the vaccine. Adolescents are the primary carriers of the bacteria that causes the disease. 

Meningococcal meningitis is a potentially life-threatening bacterial infection. Flu-like symptoms can progress rapidly, and death can occur within hours.

(via Flickr/Jennifer_Boriss)

Saint Louis University is hosting a forum on Tuesday about the public health issues facing minorities, in particular African Americans.

A panel of local academics from SLU and Washington University will present their research on topics ranging from maternal health to how segregation affects health literacy.

SLU community health expert Keon Gilbert will talk about the relationship of education to health outcomes in young African American men at risk of dropping out of high school.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

At first glance, the Saint Louis University Cancer Center and the St. Louis Symphony seem to have vastly different missions. One seeks to provide the best care possible following an often devastating diagnosis. The other seeks to spread the beauty of music wherever it can.

But a unique collaboration looks to combine those two missions as often as possible in the region's first comprehensive music therapy program – to the benefit of both organizations and the people they serve.

Football is one of the leading causes of concussions in student athletes, but they can happen in almost any sport.
(via Flickr/mel_rowling)

Coaches, athletic directors, and school nurses from across Missouri met at Saint Louis University on Thursday for a forum on sports concussions in student athletes.

The Brain Injury Association of Missouri sponsored the conference, which drew about 200 participants.

Commission approves Pevely demolition

St. Louis University has received approval from the city Planning Commission to demolish the historic Pevely Dairy Complex. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that the commission approved the demolition Wednesday night.

The city Preservation Board originally denied the demolition request, prompting the appeal to the commission.

(Courtesy SoccerSTL.net)

Harry Keough, a member of the U.S. soccer team that upset England at the 1950 World Cup, has died. He was 84.

Keough was a native St. Louisan and coached soccer at Saint Louis University, where he won five national NCAA titles.

Keough died Tuesday, U.S. Soccer Federation spokesman Michael Kammarman said.

A defender who had one goal in 19 appearances for the U.S. from 1949-57, Keough started all three games for the Americans at the 1950 World Cup and was captain when the U.S. played Spain in its opener.

(The Lawrence Group via Saint Louis University)

The St. Louis city Planning Commission has agreed to consider whether Saint Louis University should be allowed to tear down three buildings at the old Pevely Dairy site in midtown to build a new ambulatory care center.

(University of Nevada-Las Vegas)

Will be updated.

The man who brought "Spoonball" to St. Louis has died.

Multiple media outlets are reporting that Charlie Spoonhour, the head coach of the Saint Louis University Bilikens basketball team from 1992 to 1999, passed away today at his home in Chapel Hill, N.C. Spoonhour was 72 years old.

(via Vimeo/ Saint Louis University)

Saint Louis University has released a video tour of the "new home of the Saint Louis University School of Law" on the video sharing site Vimeo.

Here's the video:

(The Lawrence Group via Saint Louis University)

Updated 10:30 p.m. Dec. 19

Saint Louis University says it's considering all options after the city's Preservation Board denied its request to demolish most of the Pevely Dairy complex and replace it with a new $75 million ambulatory care building at the site.

On Wednesday, St. Louis will get a progress report on local participation in the National Children’s Study.

The study – which is currently in a pilot phase – will examine how environmental factors affect the health and development of more than a 100,000 children nationwide, by tracking them from before birth to age 21.

(via Wikimedia Commons/FEMA Photo Library)

St. Louis County to test new warning system on Mon.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the county will test the new $7 million warning siren system at 11 a.m. Monday. The county's emergency operations center will monitor closely to make sure the 180 speakers work properly.

(via flickr/alancleaver_2000)

Saint Louis University is hosting a conference this week on advances in criminal death investigation and forensic science.

Conference organizer and SLU pathologist Dr. Mary Case is the chief medical examiner for St. Charles, Jefferson, and Franklin counties. Case says that this year, the biennial event has drawn about 200 participants from across the country.

Max Starkloff with his daughter, Emily
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Funeral services for disability rights pioneer Max Starkloff have been set.

When the cabinet of the Interfaith Partnership of St. Louis held a retreat last week, the main item on the agenda was to discuss faith as a bridge over the area's racial divide.

But Batya Abramson-Goldstein, chair of the cabinet, said she realized another topic cried out for the group to discuss and take a stand -- the controversy over a Muslim center planned for a few blocks from Ground Zero in New York.

Dr. Frank R. Burton, whose research on chronic pancreatitis helped dispel the widely held assumption that sometimes led patients to be incorrectly labeled as problem drinkers, died of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (lung disease) at Saint Louis University Hospital on Monday (Aug. 2, 2010). He was 58.

Dr. Burton, a professor of internal medicine, suffered a heart attack in June while vacationing, but was recovering well when it was discovered that he had advanced lung disease. The illnesses were determined to be unrelated.

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