Saint Louis University


Harry Keough, a member of the U.S. soccer team that upset England at the 1950 World Cup, has died. He was 84.

Keough was a native St. Louisan and coached soccer at Saint Louis University, where he won five national NCAA titles.

Keough died Tuesday, U.S. Soccer Federation spokesman Michael Kammarman said.

A defender who had one goal in 19 appearances for the U.S. from 1949-57, Keough started all three games for the Americans at the 1950 World Cup and was captain when the U.S. played Spain in its opener.

(The Lawrence Group via Saint Louis University)

The St. Louis city Planning Commission has agreed to consider whether Saint Louis University should be allowed to tear down three buildings at the old Pevely Dairy site in midtown to build a new ambulatory care center.

(University of Nevada-Las Vegas)

Will be updated.

The man who brought "Spoonball" to St. Louis has died.

Multiple media outlets are reporting that Charlie Spoonhour, the head coach of the Saint Louis University Bilikens basketball team from 1992 to 1999, passed away today at his home in Chapel Hill, N.C. Spoonhour was 72 years old.

(via Vimeo/ Saint Louis University)

Saint Louis University has released a video tour of the "new home of the Saint Louis University School of Law" on the video sharing site Vimeo.

Here's the video:

(The Lawrence Group via Saint Louis University)

Updated 10:30 p.m. Dec. 19

Saint Louis University says it's considering all options after the city's Preservation Board denied its request to demolish most of the Pevely Dairy complex and replace it with a new $75 million ambulatory care building at the site.

On Wednesday, St. Louis will get a progress report on local participation in the National Children’s Study.

The study – which is currently in a pilot phase – will examine how environmental factors affect the health and development of more than a 100,000 children nationwide, by tracking them from before birth to age 21.

(via Wikimedia Commons/FEMA Photo Library)

St. Louis County to test new warning system on Mon.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports the county will test the new $7 million warning siren system at 11 a.m. Monday. The county's emergency operations center will monitor closely to make sure the 180 speakers work properly.

(via flickr/alancleaver_2000)

Saint Louis University is hosting a conference this week on advances in criminal death investigation and forensic science.

Conference organizer and SLU pathologist Dr. Mary Case is the chief medical examiner for St. Charles, Jefferson, and Franklin counties. Case says that this year, the biennial event has drawn about 200 participants from across the country.

Max Starkloff with his daughter, Emily
File photo | Bill Greenblatt | UPI

Funeral services for disability rights pioneer Max Starkloff have been set.

graphic of childhood lead poisoning in the st. louis area
Brent Jones | St. Louis Beacon | 2010

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: A St. Louis University scholar thinks it's time for cities to refine the way they address lead hazards.

The attack on lead poisoning often begins with the discovery that a child has an elevated level of lead, usually exceeding 10 micrograms for each deciliter of blood. The next step involves a little detective work to find the source of the lead. It usually turns out to be peeling lead-tainted paint and lead dust in an older home. This approach, some say, amounts to making kids the equivalent of canaries in coal mines.

When the cabinet of the Interfaith Partnership of St. Louis held a retreat last week, the main item on the agenda was to discuss faith as a bridge over the area's racial divide.

But Batya Abramson-Goldstein, chair of the cabinet, said she realized another topic cried out for the group to discuss and take a stand -- the controversy over a Muslim center planned for a few blocks from Ground Zero in New York.

Dr. Frank R. Burton, whose research on chronic pancreatitis helped dispel the widely held assumption that sometimes led patients to be incorrectly labeled as problem drinkers, died of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (lung disease) at Saint Louis University Hospital on Monday (Aug. 2, 2010). He was 58.

Dr. Burton, a professor of internal medicine, suffered a heart attack in June while vacationing, but was recovering well when it was discovered that he had advanced lung disease. The illnesses were determined to be unrelated.