For the Sake of All

For more than a year, researchers from Washington University and Saint Louis University worked together to study the health and well-being of African-Americans in St. Louis.

Through the For the Sake of All study, researchers released five briefs. A “St. Louis on the Air” series examined each of those briefs.

This week, St. Louis Public Radio launched The Listening Project, which will examine health, education and economic disparities in St. Louis’ African-American communities.

A graphic included in the For The Sake of All report shows the economic divide along Delmar Blvd in St. Louis.
For the Sake of All

The numbers tell the story: unemployment among African Americans in St. Louis is 17.6 percent, four times that of whites.

And the unemployment rate is important because unemployment turns out to be a major factor in severe health disparities in the region, according to research by the “For the Sake of All” study.

For the Sake of All

The police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson and the sight of his limp body sprawled for hours in the street have provoked an intense debate that reveals our nation’s deep divisions when it comes to questions of race and justice.

For the Sake of All

St. Louis Public Radio, in partnership with faculty at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, has received a grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health to raise awareness of and stimulate discussion around health, education and economic inequities in our region.

Courtesy For the Sake of All

Final Report: For the Sake of All

At the end of May, the "For the Sake of All" research team published its final report on the health and well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis region, a multi-disciplinary study led by  Jason Purnell, an assistant professor with the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis.

Jess Jiang / St. Louis Public Radio

After 14 months of preparation, the "For the Sake of All" authors released their final report Friday at the Missouri History Museum. Hundreds of St. Louis community members attended the presentation. Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis and St. Louis University showed how poverty, race, and education can impact health and life expectancy for African Americans in the region. 

For the Sake of All

If your skin isn’t black, why should you care about the health and well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis region?

That’s just one of the questions Washington University public health researcher Jason Purnell and his team set out to answer in a project called For the Sake of All.

Purnell, along with colleagues from Washington University and St. Louis University, assessed racial health disparities in the region and their larger impact over the course of 14 months.

Dr. Frank O. Richards
Wiley Price

Dr. Frank Richards, who built a reputation as one of the most proficient surgeons ever to don a mask because of his ability to operate with one hand while holding instruments in the other, died Thursday.

“No one could do that but Frank,” said Will Ross, M.D., associate dean for diversity and associate professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine. “When he was assistant director of Homer G. Phillips Hospital, he really had to move patients in and out; it was a high-volume operation.”

Nanette Hegamin

Scholars involved in a five-part study that examines the well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis region will seek public feedback on their research during a forum on March 3 at the Forest Park Visitor Center. The session, from 2 to 5 p.m., is free, but participants must sign up through the event registration page.

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