Sculpture | St. Louis Public Radio

Sculpture

Artists create work that explores the edges of St. Louis

Dec 1, 2017
People gather inside a giant inflatable bubble to listen to presentations about art
Provided by Gavin Kroeber

As the sun sets, several people circle around giant plastic disk laid out behind the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts. The disk inflates and attendees are invited to walk back and forth as it grows into a massive bubble.

Adults giggle as performers run around the inflated orb before inviting people inside for an installment of “At the Edge of Everything Else,” a creative soiree hosted by artist and organizer Gavin Kroeber. It’s part of a project to highlight art rooted in the urban fabric of St. Louis.

Indoor golf is coming to The Sheldon Art Galleries in summer 2018.
Provided | Scott MacLeod | Flickr

A St. Louis institution known for displaying paintings will temporarily change its focus to putt-putt next summer.

In June, all 6,000 square feet of The Sheldon Art Galleries will become a mini golf course.

Visitors can actually play the course, Sheldon Director Olivia Lahs-Gonzales said.

“Usually, you go into an art gallery and you’re not allowed to touch anything,” Lahs-Gonzales said. “This is an opportunity to be immersive, to have an immersive experience.”

Several suits made of different fabric types, including plastic and cloth, hang over individual florescent lights.
Provided by Michael DeFilippo

As you walk down the street, you might not realize that you’re on a giant rock hurtling through the galaxy at amazing speeds. That is to say, you’re standing in space. An show at Projects+Gallery, 4733 McPherson Ave., could help viewers confront this reality.

“Where you’re standing right now, you are not separated from outer space,” artist Christine Corday, said with a laugh. “You are absolutely positively in outer space.”

Two blue faces framed by jagged wood pieces rest on a bed of brick laid across a pedistal.
Provided by St. Louis Lambert International Airport

Holiday travelers will have a chance to see new art at the St. Louis Lambert International Airport this week.

At a time when many likely view the city as divided divided along political, economic and social lines, the exhibit in Terminal 1 aims to draw attention to the camaraderie and collaborative spirit that dominate the city’s art scene.

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis County Parks Department will dedicate a sculpture and plaza at the Powder Magazine Museum at Jefferson Barracks Park on Friday.

The centerpiece of the plaza is a bronze monument by St. Louisan Barbara “B.J.” Mungenast that pays tribute to the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment, known as The Old Guard. The sculpture is a duplicate of a monument that Mungenast has created for Fort Myer, Virginia, where the regiment is based.

Une Conversation (A Conversation), 1892-99, plaster, Museo Medardo Rosso
Pulitzer Arts Foundation

Turn-of-the-century artist Medardo Rosso defies categorization as much as his body of work, now on display at the Pulitzer Arts Foundation, was ahead of its time. He was born in Italy but spent many decades of his working years in Paris primarily as a sculptor, although he also produced photographs and drawings.

A print by Mitchell Eismont, cut from linoleum depicts noted physicist Albert Einstein above the words "Einstein was a refugee."
Courtesy of the St. Louis Artists' Guild

Ohio-based artist Mitchell Eismont’s interest in the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis developed while he was producing posters for East Coast musician Chadwick Stokes' “Forced to Flee” tour. Inspired by Stokes' dedication, Eismont began work on a series of prints supporting immigrants and refugees, featuring cultural figures like the Dalai Lama, Jesus and Albert Einstein.

“I think it’s probably the crisis of our generation,” Eismont said of the crisis, which stems from a long-running civil war. “I think it’s important to try and help with the situation.”

"The Way," by Alexander Liberman, seen in this file photo, is a made of steel oil tanks. While modern, it nods to many facets of ancient architecture.
Provided | Kevin J. Miyazaki

St. Louis sculpture fans can now have a hand in taking care of public art.

Laumeier Sculpture Park in Sunset Hills is asking individuals and groups to help maintain and preserve its displays with a new adoption program. Adoptions start at $25 a year.

At the lower level, contributors get their names on Laumeier’s website and an on-site digital wall. For $50, they receive an adoption paper and a color photo of their sculpture. At the top level of $500, they get a private tour of the park with the park’s executive director. All donations are tax-deductible.

An uncooked egg sits in stone, the shell turned transluscent by white vinegar. Through it the yolk is visible.
Provided by the Catalina Ouyang

Catalina Ouyang’s sculptures are an amalgam of unexpected materials: a raw egg soaked in white vinegar, marble, fake bones, a printed copy of Italo Calvino’s book “Invisible Cities” and basketball shorts. 

Ouyang uses the objects to examine her Chinese-American identity and challenge social pressures placed on immigrants to conform to North American norms. She specifically aims to provoke questions about how society asks immigrants to assimilate into white culture.

She wants people to consider what for her is a consistent dilemma: “How to contend with what I call the aspirational fantasy of whiteness in what I think persists as an imperialist and colonialist power structure."

Vaughn Vaughn Davis's Sunset Hills, a ripped and orange canvas hangs from a white wall.
Provided by Philip Slein

Updated Oct. 24 at 10:25 with additional media

Artist Vaughn Davis is an anomaly in the St. Louis commercial gallery scene. He’s young, local and exhibiting in a space usually reserved for more established artists: Philip Slein Gallery in the Central West End.

Jim Schmidt, who coordinates much of the gallery’s exhibits, said there was almost no doubt about showing the emerging artist’s work in their project space.

You Are My Reflection by Erin Rachel Hudak. Installed with the help of St. Louis Community College students at Paul Artspace
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Two north St. Louis County groups are bringing together local and visiting artists.  Paul Artspace and Sculptureworks Ferguson founders said they’re united by a common cause.

“We’re looking to go into the community, use the exhibition as this kind of mechanism to create conversations, to create networks, to introduce people from outside the community to people inside the community,” said Michael Behle, founder of Paul Artspace founder.

Artist Davide Weaver examines an installation-in-progrress at his "Star Wars Toys" art exhibition at the City Museum.
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

If the “The Force Awakens” has reignited your passion for “Star Wars,” you might be interested in an art exhibition at St. Louis’ City Museum.

The 24-foot-tall "Adinkra Tower" by sculptor Thomas Sleet was dedicated on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday.
Arts in Transit

If you see people craning their necks to look up at Riverview Transit Center in north city, here’s a reason why: They’re likely contemplating a new 24-foot-tall sculpture called “Adinkra Tower.”

Officials from Metro’s Arts in Transit program formally dedicated the work today. It features Adinkra symbols of the Ashanti people of Ghana in West Africa, representing principles including creation, hope and wisdom.

Pulitzer Arts Foundation combines African art and an algorithm

Oct 16, 2015
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation’s first exhibit of exclusively African art asks the question, “how can technology help curate a show?” For curator Kristina Van Dyke, this question may predict the future of curating.

“I think this is a really important show for the field because it introduces a methodology that I believe will be increasingly important,” said Van Dyke, the Pulitzer's former director, as “Kota: Digital Excavations in African Art” was opening.

Detail of 'If a World is a Fair Place Then...' artwork Raqs Media Collective
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

As Laumeier Sculpture Park opens its Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center to the public, exhibited works will be designed to bridge international and local communities. Among those whose work is featured in the first show, which opens Friday, is Raqs Media Collective.

Fred Sandback, Untitled (Study for Kunstraum Munich)
Estate of Fred Sandback, Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation’s first exhibition since its reopening comes to an end this week. The exhibit highlights three artists including Fred Sandback whose yarn sculpture appears in one of the building’s new gallery spaces.

The piece stands out from the other work on display because Pulitzer staff rearranges the sculpture each week. This week Sandback’s piece “Sixty Four Three-Part Pieces,” enters its final Pulitzer iteration.

New city-block sized arts compound opens in Granite City

Jul 16, 2015
Some objects found inside the newly acquired GCADD buildings will remain
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

In Granite City, $75,000 can buy you almost an entire city block. At least if you’re an arts organization.

“This is the promised land is what it is, it’s the land of opportunity. And as much as it may sound hackneyed or trite, it’s true,” said Galen Gondolfi, founder of Fort Gondo Compound for the Arts.

Laumeier expansion complete after decade of planning

Jul 1, 2015

This week marks the end of construction on Laumeier Sculpture Park’s fine arts center. According to park Executive Director Marilu Knode, the entire building was designed to bridge the gap between future indoor exhibits and its already established outdoor collection.

“You know we’re an outdoor park, we don’t need a fancy building we need something that’s like a barn!” she said.

Mathias Gasteiger, German, 1871-1934; Hercules and the Hydra, 1921-30; bronze; 95 ½ x 77 x 56 inches; Saint Louis Art Museum, Funds given anonymously 1:1930
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

The 15 year-long renovation of the St. Louis Art Museum has finally reached completion. Museum director Brent Benjamin said he hopes the completed sculpture garden will be as well received as the rest of the museum’s changes.

St. Louis Artworks finds new home in The Loop

Apr 29, 2015
St. Louis Artworks new home on Delmar Boulevard
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Artworks is preparing its first permanent home in 20 years.

“It feels like the beginning of a new day. A dream is coming true,” said Executive Director Priscilla Block.

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