Security

Trees surrounding the outside of the Central Reform Congregation in St. Louis.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

Six Jewish institutions in the St. Louis area are receiving a total of $370,000 from the Department of Homeland Security to help protect them against possible threats.

The money is the latest allocation of federal preparedness grants intended to help prevent and protect the country from terrorist attacks and other emergencies.

Entrance to Normandy High School campus
Google Maps screen capture

Updated at 2:16 p.m. Wednesday with withdrawal of suit: The mother of a student at Normandy High School who filed suit in federal court challenging the suspension of her daughter after a fight at the school last month, which involved adults as well as students, has withdrawn her suit.

The lawsuit filed on behalf of Jennifer Williams and her daughter, a freshman  identified only by the initials J.M., says she “was summarily barred from attendance at the school without notice of a hearing and for no substantive fault of her own” after the fight on May 23. But her lawyer, Robert Herman, said Wednesday that because alternative arrangements for her daughter's education have been made, the lawsuit has been withdrawn.

Mary Delach Leonard | St. Louis Public Radio

With the home opener one week away, Cardinals fans should be prepared for ramped-up security at Busch Stadium and allow extra time to walk through new metal detectors at all gates.

Unlike at the airport, fans won’t have to take off their shoes and belts. But they will have to put their keys, cell phones and metal objects on tables when they pass through the detectors, says Joe Abernathy, vice president of stadium operations.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The Boston Marathon bombing tragedy has St. Louis police brainstorming ways to make local events more secure.

Monday’s fatal bombing infused urgency into a Wednesday meeting of the city police department’s command staff about upcoming events in St. Louis, according to Police Chief Sam Dotson. These include the Sat., June 15 Komen Race for the Cure. Last year, more than 50,000 pink-clad participants joined the annual 5K event to fight breast cancer.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Former U.S. Sen. Jim Talent, R-Mo., says he’s strongly in favor of the federal government living within its means. But that doesn’t mean, he adds, that the United States should put its national security at risk.

That’s what Talent fears is happening as a result of the latest round of defense cuts mandated by the “sequester” – mandated across-the-board budget cuts for the next 10 years that went into place a few weeks ago as a result of Republicans and Democrats in Congress, and President Barack Obama, failing to agree on an alternate deficit-cutting plan.

(via Flickr/Senator McCaskill)

On the heels of outgoing Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s testimony in front of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the Benghazi attack Wednesday morning, Missouri’s U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill says she will be speaking to Senator John Kerry about embassy security prior to his confirmation hearings.

During a conference call with reporters Wednesday, McCaskill said that she feels very strongly that the U.S. should not have contracted security in places where we are in conflict. She said the military should guard those embassies.

(via Flickr/david_shane)

The Missouri Senate is considering legislation that would beef up security at the State Capitol.

The bill would increase the number of security cameras at the State Capitol and allow the Governor’s Office of Administration to hire private, armed security guards if needed.  It’s sponsored by Robin Wright-Jones (D, St. Louis).  She filed the bill shortly after someone placed rifle target stickers outside her office and the offices of several other Democratic Senators and one House Republican lawmaker.

Bill Greenblatt | UPI | File Photo

Fans heading down to the Edward Jones Dome for the Rams home opener this weekend will see more police and security personnel around the stadium.

But Bob Calderon, the Dome's director of public safety, says fans won't have to do anything different.

"They will continue to go through the pat-down process and have the same gameday experience that they would have prior to this particular anniversary," Calderon said.