Sexually Transmitted Diseases

The chlamydia bacteria, stained and viewed at 500 times.
National Cancer Institute | Dr. Lance Liotta Laboratory

Post updated 12/16/14 with response from St. Louis City Health Department.

A new federal report shows that the city of St. Louis had the highest rate of chlamydia and the second-highest rate of gonorrhea infections among major U.S. cities in 2013.  

"We've had persistently high rates for a long time," said Brad Stoner, who directs the St. Louis STD and HIV Prevention Training Center at Washington University. "These rates are difficult to bring down unless we develop a concerted, community-wide effort to reach out, screen and treat populations at risk." 

Via Flickr/meddygarnet

St. Louis continues to have some of the highest rates of two common sexually transmitted diseases in the country.

According to data released on Wednesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, St. Louis ranked second highest among U.S. cities for per capita rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea.

(National Cancer Institute/Dr. Lance Liotta Laboratory)

When the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released its most recent data on sexually transmitted infections, the numbers once again showed bad news for St. Louis.

Chlamydia cases in the region climbed by almost 6 percent between 2010 and 2011. Gonorrhea was up 17 percent. That’s nothing new, especially in the city itself, which is consistently among the top five of infections per capita.

How do rates get so high in the first place? And how do you get them down after years above average?

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: He got his education in the streets, and she got hers at the University of Texas School of Public Health. She left a job at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta to join the St. Louis Health Department. He also got a job in the department after he decided to turn his life around and focus on encouraging inner city youngsters to go straight and steer clear of at-risk behavior.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: The 12-story building between Powell Symphony Hall and the Third Baptist Church in midtown seemed like an odd place to house the city's main clinic for treating sexually transmitted diseases. Yet, for a long time, some city residents wishing to get help, counseling or advice for an STD had few options besides visiting the public clinic on the second floor of the building at 634 North Grand.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Health professionals in St. Louis are paying closer attention to the sexual health of girls in foster care because data show that about half of them become pregnant or give birth while they are still teens, according to Dr. Katie Plax, a specialist in adolescent medicine at Washington University.