Sound Bites

Kelsey Proud / St. Louis Public Radio

Simon Lusky, team chef for the St. Louis Cardinals and owner of Athlete Eats on Cherokee Street, plans to start operating a food truck and open a new restaurant in Brentwood.

And, as reported by our partners at Sauce Magazine, the restaurant will re-brand as Revel Kitchen. The food truck will be called Revel Kitchen Food Truck and will debut at the magazine’s Food Truck Friday on May 8.

First row: The owners of Earthbound Beer, Los Punk; Second row: Tacos at La Vallesana, ArtBar
(Courtesy: Sauce Magazine)

In South St. Louis, Cherokee Street is booming.

That’s according to Kristin Dennis, co-owner of the Fortune Teller Bar and a member of the Cherokee Station Business Association’s board of directors.

The foundation of the street is Mexican fare and antique shopping but just within the last few years, more than 20 new food and drink establishments have opened.

“Every few months we have new businesses opening,” Dennis told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday.

Mamacitas Ancho Fried Chicken & Waffles from Atomic Cowboy
(Courtesy: Sauce Magazine)

There’s new interest in an old favorite: fried chicken. It’s one of the ultimate comfort foods, and has become a popular dish at St. Louis’ old and new restaurants.

Old Standard Fried Chicken is one of those new restaurants, opening in October. As its name indicates, the restaurant specializes in fried chicken.

David Choi demonstrates the grill for Steve Potter and Ligaya Figueras on Feb. 3, 2015, at Seoul Q in St. Louis.
Katie Cook / St. Louis Public Radio

It all started in the kitchen of David Choi’s grandma. It was there that Choi fell in love with the flavors of Korean barbecue and the communal act of eating together, and got the idea for Seoul Taco. Choi's Korean-Mexican fusion food truck hit the streets in 2011 and one year later became a brick-and-mortar restaurant off the Delmar Loop.

Sauce executive editor Ligaya Figueras sits with the magazine's 2009 "ones to watch": Cory Shupe, far left, T.J. Vytlacil, Cory King and Adam Alnether.
Jonathan Gayman / Sauce Magazine

Six years ago, Sauce Magazine put together its first “ones to watch” list. At the time, though, Adam Altnether and T.J. Vytlacil were just trying to get started.

“The year before that was kind of this meteoric rise in Niche that everything just kept coming to me,” Altnether told “Cityscape” host Steve Potter on Friday. In 2009, Altnether was the chef de cuisine at Niche. Today, he’s a partner at Craft Restaurant Group and Niche’s executive chef.

Bar manager Joel Clark mixes drinks at The Purple Martin in St. Louis.
Sauce Magazine

Joel Clark, who has been called one of St. Louis’ top craft cocktail bartenders, lost his sense of smell after suffering a seizure in December. Losing a sense is traumatic in itself, but losing the sense of smell also means Clark has lost his sense of taste.

Andrew Jennrich, left, is the head butcher at The Butchery, Truffles Restaurant's new meat market. Brandon Benanck, right, is Truffles' executive chef.
Meera Nagarajan / Courtesy of Sauce Magazine

Butcher shops are changing. Whole-animal butcher shops, using local farm-raised animals, are popping up in St. Louis. In this month's Sound Bites segment on "Cityscape," we talked to local butchers about the benefits of the new trend.

Guests

Wine glasses
Slack12 via Flickr

It turns out wine may not be as highfalutin as many believe.

Wine has only been part of American culture for the last 30 years, sommelier Patricia Wamhoff said, while in Europe it’s part of everyday consumption. More people are looking at wine as a hobby, sommelier Andrey Ivanov said. “It’s very accessible nowadays.”

So we put these experts to the test:

Do you look down at a $5 bottle of wine?

Ligaya Figueras

St. Louis currently boasts about 15 Vietnamese restaurants, but that wasn't the case when Qui Tran’s family opened Mai Lee, one of St. Louis' first Vietnamese restaurants, in 1985. On this month’s Sound Bites segment in partnership with Sauce Magazine, we talked about the Vietnamese dining scene with Ligaya Figueras, executive editor of Sauce Magazine, and Qui Tran of Mai Lee.

Carmen Troesser/Sauce Magazine

It’s not breakfast. It’s not lunch. Somehow it’s both and all the more delicious for it. No one knows for sure when brunch first began, but the first record of the word in print comes from an 1895 article in a British magazine called Hunter’s Weekly. Some link the origins of brunch to the upper-crust British tradition of hunter’s luncheons. Others say it comes from the Catholic practice of fasting until after mass.  From Great Britain, brunch made its way to the United States .

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