The 2016 St. Louis Surge women's professional basketball team.
St. Louis Surge

Earlier this summer, the St. Louis Surge women’s professional basketball team took home a national championship in the Women’s Blue Chip Basketball League. There are 34 teams from across the United States that compete in the league.

Khalia Collier, the owner and general manager of the St. Louis Surge, said that the team has earned “quite the fan base.” She started the team five years ago.

Gymnasts prepare for the P&G Championships at St. Louis' Chaifetz Arena this weekend, during podium training on Wednesday.
USA Gymnastics | John Chen

Several of the world's top men and women gymnasts will compete at St. Louis' Chaifetz Arena this weekend, and for some, dreams of going to the 2016 Rio Olympics will be made.

The North America Outgames in St. Louis would have featured several running events, including half and full marathons, as well as softball and swimming.
Courtesy STL Equality Games, LLC

The 3rd North America OutGames, which was to be held in St. Louis around Memorial Day weekend, has been canceled due to low registration numbers and lacking financial support.

Parents cheer during a football game against Christian Brothers College High School at St. Louis University High on Friday. At left, Verlion Evans cheers for her nephew, Andrew Clair.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

When she was a student at Maplewood Richmond Heights High School back in the 70s, Betty Pearson would ring a cowbell every time the Blue Devils made a touchdown. Her high school sweetheart — now her husband — played football, and their oldest son later followed in his footsteps. So when the school board announced they were ending the district's high school football program due to a lack of interest, Pearson was pretty shocked.

“I was first sad! I was like, 'Oh wow.' You know?” Pearson said.

Soo McClure celebrates a successful round at the DuBowl Lanes in South St. Louis.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Soo McClure steps up to the lane with a bowling ball the color of green marble. She lines herself up with the help of a guard rail, takes a deep breath and bowls.

Nine pins go down. A sighted bowler calls out the pin number for the last one, and she tries again for a spare, but her ball ends up in the gutter. 

Joe Ehrmann speaks at TEDxBaltimore on Jan. 25, 2013.
TEDxBaltimore via Flickr

Joe Ehrmann, a minister and retired professional football lineman, says many of society’s problems can be traced back to three words.

“The three scariest words every boy receives is when he’s young and told ‘Be a man,’” Ehrmann told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh this week. “That’s always in the context of stop acting that way, stop with the tears, stop with the emotions, don’t be a mama’s boy. At a very early age, boys start to separate their hearts from their head(s).”

(Tim Lloyd)

The owners of two amateur soccer teams are joining forces to bring a United Soccer Leagues professional team to St. Louis.

Tony Glavin owner and coach of the St. Louis Lions and Andrew Haines, St. Louis Ambush indoor soccer team owner, are hoping to establish pro team presence by 2015.

The partners created a website to gauge interest. Glavin calls the response "phenomenal."

(via flikr/Scott Beale)

In the past three decades, gaming has moved from the arcade to the TV console, with ever more sophisticated technology. But recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in the retro jewel of the arcade: pinball.

From 500 members in 2005, the ranks of the International Flipper Pinball Association have swollen to more than 20,000. The association organizes tournaments around the world and records rankings of competitive players.

Lou Gehrig chewing gum card

You may not have heard of him but baseball historians well remember Walter Clement “Wally” Pipp. He was the starting first-base man on the 1925 New York Yankees.

One day, the story goes, he arrived at the ballpark complaining of a terrible headache. Manager Miller Huggins overheard Pipp asking the trainer for aspirin and subsequently told him to take the day off to recuperate. 

(Via Wikimedia Commons)

A lot has changed in the world of baseball since 1946. But a familiar pair of elite teams are once again playing in the Fall Classic.  For the fourth time, the St. Louis Cardinals are facing off against the Boston Red Sox in the World Series. Previous matchups took place in 1946, 1967 and 2004.

And this year's matchup has some striking similarities to the team's first meeting in 1946. Then, as now, St. Louis Cardinals defeated the Dodgers in playoffs before facing off against the Red Sox.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: What do a fourth grader at Jackson Park Elementary School and legendary African-American baseball player Jackie Robinson have in common? Determination. Courage. Confidence. They both overcame barriers that many could not. They both felt different and did something about it.

Fourth grader Xavier Morgan-Gillard told his story in “What Jackie Robinson and I Have in Common” and entered the essay in the Major League Baseball and Scholastic Inc. 2013 Breaking Barriers in Sports, In Life contest, which drew 18,700 submissions. He, along with three other students, won first place.

My first protocol on rooting in sports is that you should stick with the teams that you grew up with. I know we're a transient society, but that's just it: Continuing to cheer for your original hometown teams is one way of displaying the old-fashioned value of allegiance.

If you grew up in Cleveland, say, and moved somewhere Sun Belt-ish, I know how hard it is, but the measure of whether you are a good person is that you must remain loyal to the Browns and Indians and that team that LeBron James left behind.

Emily Isaacs loves playing soccer so much that it hurts.

While Cardinals fans waited to get their first look at Jim Edmonds in a Cincy uniform, second-baseman Brandon Phillips of the Reds couldn’t contain his disgust for Edmonds’ old team.

Phillips, who fouled a ball off his shin Saturday in Chicago, missed Sunday’s game but was apparently feeling well enough to spout off to Hal McCoy of the Dayton Daily News that there was no way he’d miss Monday night’s game.

Jose Espinosa steps into the tee box of Meadowbrook Country Club's driving range. Ahead of him lie hundreds of yards of grassy terrain spotted with multicolored flags and golf balls. Espinosa peers out onto the surface, looks down, grabs a ball from a nearby bucket, gently places it in the tee box and launches the ball an incredible distance.

Before the ball even hits the ground, Espinosa turns around and finds Hockey Hall of Fame inductee and former St. Louis Blue Bernie Federko and gives him a high-five.

The Supreme Court was not expressing an opinion on the legal issue when it decided without comment to turn down the appeal by Major League Baseball..  But the action effectively ends the suit in which Major League Baseball and the Players Association joined forces against C.B.C. Distribution and Marketing, the parent of CDM Fantasy Sports of St. Louis.

What do you think?

- Is retaliation for complaining about discrimination the same as discrimination?

- Should the Supreme Court say that retaliation is covered by the law if the text of the statute doesn't say so explicitly?

- What about the male coach of the girls' softball team who suffered reprisals after complaining the girls didn't get the same resources as the boys' baseball team?