SSM Health Care

369 members of the nurse's union at St. Louis University Hospital participated in the vote throughout the day Monday.
Durrie Bouscaren | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 10 a.m. June 16

Members of a nurse’s union at Saint Louis University Hospital voted against de-authorizing their union late Monday, a measure that would have effectively created a “right-to-work” policy within the hospital.  

The National Nurses United affiliate has about 650 members at SLU Hospital; only 140 voted in favor of de-authorization during three scheduled voting periods throughout the day. The measure needed 326 votes to pass, which would have made the payment of union dues optional.  

A Level I Trauma Center at St. Louis University Hospital.
Provided by Saint Louis University Hospital

The Monday announcement that nonprofit, Catholic SSM Health is acquiring Saint Louis University Hospital, the medical school's teaching facility, from for-profit Tenet was expected by many St. Louisans — expected, that is, nearly a generation ago.

In 1997, the SSM network lost its bid to buy the SLU medical complex at Grand Boulevard and Vista Avenue. The battle pitted the archbishop against the Jesuit-run university and divided rank-and-file Catholics.

(Courtesy Photo / Used With Permission)

Cedric Antonio Kyles, better known as Cedric “The Entertainer,” spent several of his formative years in St. Louis.

He was born in Jefferson City and moved to Berkeley, in north St. Louis County, after junior high school.

Kyles got his start in comedy by working in clubs in the St. Louis area and his career took off when he appeared on “It's Showtime at the Apollo,” a show he would eventually host. He also performed on “Def Comedy Jam.” His first acting role was on “The Steve Harvey Show” as the lovable P.E. teacher and Harvey’s sidekick, Cedric.

DePaul Health Center

Women are both more likely to suffer a stroke, and less likely to be treated in a timely manner when they experience one. May is Stroke Awareness Month, and today on St. Louis on the Air Dr. Amer Alshekhlee of the SSM Neurosciences Institute outlined five risk factors that increase the likelihood a woman will have a stroke.

(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

In 2010, the slumping state budget forced the Missouri Department of Mental Health to close the emergency room and 50 short-term beds at the Metropolitan Psychiatric Center.

The move saved $16 million. But it also forced those in need of immediate mental health treatment into local hospitals, which are not designed for those in crisis.

With the help of the area’s two largest hospital systems and some state support, there are now 16 beds available for patients with psychiatric needs who have already been screened at other hospital emergency rooms. Beginning this fall, patients needing urgent mental health care should be able to go straight to the new Psychiatric Stabilization Center.

The PSC is a temporary fix - but its creators are also hoping it helps shift the treatment paradigm.

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SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center - one of the hospitals in SSM Health Care's St. Louis-area group of medical facilities.

For the first time in its 25-year history, SSM Health Care no longer has a nun as its top executive officer.

Sister Mary Jean Ryan will remain as chairman of the board of SSM. But she says she's reaching an age, 73, when she would prefer to step away from the day-to-day operations of the system, which owns 15 hospitals and two nursing homes in four states, including Missouri.

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The Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center on Delmar Blvd. in St. Louis.

Almost exactly a year ago, the state of Missouri shuttered the emergency room at the Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center because of cost overruns.

Now, officials with BJC and SSM - two of the largest health care systems in the state - say by the end of October, they hope to replace at least some of that capacity.


SSM Health Care will not Hire Smokers Starting in July

A St. Louis-based health care organization says it wants to improve the health of its employees and set an example, so smokers need not apply.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that SSM Health Care will begin a tobacco-free hiring policy in July.