St. Charles | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Charles

Curtis Wilcoxen, a manager for Lloyd and Harry's Bar and Grill speaks to city council members about his oposition to the bill.
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Charles business owners will now have to abide by new liquor laws.

The St. Charles City Council voted Tuesday night on a liquor ordinance for the city after months of debate and controversy. The law will establish several standards :

The St. Charles City Council meets to present the latest revisions to the proposed liquor ordinance to the public. Aug. 21, 2018
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Charles city officials have changed the controversial proposed liquor ordinance, causing contentious debate at the Tuesday night City Council meeting.

Council members presented the revisions publicly, which included an update to the city’s 1975 liquor ordinance. That ordinance has required bars to earn either at least 50 percent or $200,000 per year from food sales for decades. The new proposal would mandate any establishment with a liquor license on Main Street, to earn no more than 50 percent of their revenue from alcohol sales and would remove the $200,000 option.

Tory Knight takes inventory at The Lost Whiskey in June. Part of the new proposal includes raising the amount of an establishment's revenue that must come from food sales to 60 percent.
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Charles City Council plans to introduce an ordinance next week aimed at taming North Main Street’s late night revelers. The new plan comes after an initial proposal of an early ‘last call’ ignited an uproar from area bar owners and failed to advance.

Dave Beckering, a council member and backer of both proposed ordinances, said disturbances from people exiting bars and nightclubs on North Main Street have spun out of control in the last two years, creating late-night traffic that police can’t handle.

The Legacy magazine began publication last fall. The magazine has won numerous awards including 16 awards from the Missouri College Media Association Conference.
Brian Heffernan | St. Louis Public Radio

Students, administrators and journalism organizations are reacting to Lindenwood University’s decision to cease the physical publication of the student-run magazine, The Legacy.

Student-staff was notified by the university that printing of The Legacy would shut down on Friday, sparking accusations of censorship from student-media staff. Lindenwood University alumni have voiced their concerns over the announcement, said The Legacy News Editor, Madeline Raineri. She said students and alumni are considering what to do next.

Clientele of The Lost Whiskey swarm the dance floor and the bar during last call. The bar/restaurant opened its doors in late April and is one of the bars that could be affected by the proposed ordinance
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Charles’ historic district has two distinct identities.

During the day, people come to the three-block stretch of Main Street to browse in small shops and eat at locally owned restaurants. At night, 18 bars along the same street attract students from Lindenwood University and those looking for a good time.

But in recent years, that transformation after sunset has caused tension in both the historic district and the city.

St. Charles Mayor Sally Faith and St. Charles Police Chief Randy McKinley listen to bar manager Curtis Wilcoxen propose alternative solutions to an ordinance that would require many Main Street St. Charles bars to stop selling alcohol by 11 p.m. 6/26/18
Chad Davis | St. Louis Public Radio

Owners from Main Street St. Charles restaurants and bars met with city officials Tuesday to propose alternatives to a bill that would ban the sale of alcohol at most bars after 11 p.m.

The proposals included a possible new tax on liquor sales, new parking fees after 9 p.m. and more parking security to reduce crimes on Main Street. Others suggested that bars on Main Street should have to earn at least 60 percent of its revenue from food sales and no more than 40 percent of its revenue from alcohol.

Supporters and opponents of President Donald Trump clashed for several hours outside of the St. Charles Convention Center where he spoke Wednesday afternoon. Police intervened several times.  11/29/17
Brit Hanson | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 3:45 p.m. — Hours before President Donald Trump was expected to call for changes to the federal tax code that he claims will boost the nation’s economy, protesters gathered outside of the St. Charles Convention Center.

Nearly 100 people who oppose the president and his policies held signs that read “LIAR” and chanted slogans like “Save America, Impeach Trump.” There were clashes between people who came to support the president and those who oppose him.

But the dominant message on St. Charles streets was that Trump’s presidency has been bad for the nation, particularly members of minority groups.

Two men confront a crowd of demonstrators during a protest Friday night in St. Charles. It was the eighth day of protests following the not-guilty verdict of white ex-St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley on first-degree murder charges.
File photo | Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

One week after a judge acquitted former St. Louis police officer Jason Stockley of murder in the 2011 death of Anthony Lamar Smith, protesters continued their push for change, taking their message Friday to the mostly white city of St. Charles.

Pedestrian, biking bridges to be built in St. Charles

Feb 13, 2017
Future plans for highway crossing over 364 and 94 in St. Charles. Plans to be finished in spring 2018.
provided / Great Rivers Greenway

Pedestrians and bikers will eventually be able to cross over two busy highways in St. Charles. A project is planned to construct two new pedestrian bridges over highways 364 and 94. 

This November 2016 photos shows the front of Zack and Brie Smithey's shipping-container home in St. Charles.
Zack Smithey

As Zack Smithey began building his shipping-container home in St. Charles last May, the controversy around it grew along with the house.

Compliments came, but also complaints: Even after Smithey painted the red metal gray, it just didn’t look like other homes in the neighborhood.

On Tuesday, the City Council voted to categorize such dwellings as “conditional use” buildings. That means anyone who wants to build one will have to seek city approval to do so. The council also decided that container homes must include a pitched roof, and be fully sided — using vinyl siding, brick, wood or some other material.

This fall 2016 photo shows the the back of the Smithey's container home with new sod and patio.
Provided | Zack Smithey

A proposed amendment to St. Charles' building codes would make shipping-container homes blend in with more typical houses in the city.

A new home on Elm Street sparked the debate that led to the regulations, introduced at Tuesday night’s City Council meeting. The amendment would require shipping-container homes to be fully sided and have a pitched roof.

Zack and Brie Smithey's railroad-shipping container home on Elm Street in St. Charles will be painted taupe and include glass windows across the front.
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Charles City Council defeated a proposal Tuesday night that would have banned residents from building shipping-container houses in areas with only brick and siding homes.

But that's not the end of the controversy.

At the center of the flap is a home under construction on Elm Street. St. Charles residents Zack and Brie Smithey are building their 3,000-square-foot house out of eight railroad shipping containers.

Zack and Brie Smithey in front of their shipping-container home under construction in July 2016
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated with St. Charles City Council vote July 6, 2016, 12:51pm - An unusual house made of railroad-shipping containers is going up on Elm Street in St. Charles. But if city officials have their way, the nearly-finished place could be the last of its kind in the city’s traditional neighborhoods.

St. Charles residents Zack and Brie Smithey began working on their two-story home in May. Their house is being made from eight red containers, doubled stacked and four across. It sits on a sloping lot between a split-level and a ranch.

Flickr | DIGITIZEDCHAOS

St. Charles County remains the fastest growing county in the St. Louis region, according to U.S. census data released Thursday.

New numbers from the 2014 American Community Survey show that the population of St. Charles County has grown by about 5 percent since 2010, from an estimated 361,602 to an estimated 379,493.

Demographics analyst and Saint Louis University professor Ness Sandoval points to the county’s relatively low cost of living as the cause of the growth.

Mapbox, OpenStreetMap

The first I-70 interchange west of the Missouri River is getting an $18 million update. Construction starts next spring to replace Fifth Street’s partial cloverleaf interchange with a diverging diamond.

It’s the latest project in a decade-long plan to improve the main corridor through the St. Louis region’s fastest growing county.

The Festival of the Little Hills is taking place in St. Charles this weekend. For our family, that was the serendipitous festival.

Somehow, the day we would decide to go to St. Charles and check out Main Street would coincide with Little Hills. We never planned it. But here’s the alert so you can.

Members of the St. Louis Regional Heroin Initiative flank posters listing those arrested for heroin-related charges Wednesday, June 10, 2015 in the St. Charles City Police Department.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

More than 50 heroin traffickers have been arrested for crimes committed in St. Charles County. Most were arrested in a 30-hour period, bringing a swift conclusion to a ten-month collaborative investigation.

Since last fall state, local and federal authorities have been working together to bring about the arrests, representing what the head of the St. Louis region’s Drug Enforcement Agency described as a more proactive partnership than past collaborations.

Courtesy Missouri State Parks

When Missouri became a state 193 years ago Sunday, the plan was to put the state capitol in a central location. But there was just one problem.

“There was no Jefferson City at the time,” said Sue Love, with the Missouri Parks Department. "They built it specifically to be our capitol. So while they were building Jefferson City, they had to have some place to meet, plan and prepare because they had already started the process of becoming a state.”

Sterlic / Flickr

Updated Monday 8:54 a.m.

The City of  St. Peters states on their website that the boil order has been lifted for the city and the City of St. Charles:

(via Flickr/kla4067)

Pedestrians using Fifth Street in St. Charles may see more accessible streets in their future.

Three different proposals of the Fifth Street Gateway Project will be presented at an open house Wednesday evening at St. John United Church of Christ at 5 p.m. 

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