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St. Louis on the Air

Former East St. Louis mayor Alvin Parks, Jr. joined "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Alvin Parks, Jr. joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to discuss his two terms as mayor of East St. Louis and his plans for the future.

Councilwoman Emeka Jackson-Hicks unseated Parks in the April 7 election. After a court order removed his name from the ballot, Parks was forced to wage a write-in campaign. Jackson-Hicks is the daughter of Democratic state Rep. Eddie Lee Jackson. She was sworn into office on Monday.

     

"Get to Know M.E." http://www.get2knowthemetroeast.com

In March 2015, 23 businesses and organizations collaborated to create the “Get to Know M.E.” campaign (M.E. standing for “Metro East”) to counter the negative images some people may have about the Metro East.

Founded by Carol Bartle, the campaign’s goal is to help everyone in the Metro East get to know their communities better and to embrace each other as neighbors, all while working to improve the overall image outsiders may have about the region.

Terrell Carter is pastor of the mostly-white Webster Groves Baptist Church
Terrell Carter / Courtesy Photo

Since the shooting death of 18-year-old Michael Brown and the subsequent community unrest, dialogue about racial division in the St. Louis area became a frequent topic. Additionally, many people vowed to come together and address the apparent ‘invisible line’ separating black and white residents in the region.

Joining host Don Marsh were (from L to R) Vanessa Cooksey, Jason Purnell and Yemi Akande-Bartsch
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

For the Sake of All” is an interdisciplinary project addressing the health and well-being of African Americans in St. Louis and St. Louis County that began in 2013. A collaboration of Washington University and Saint Louis University, the project issued five policy briefs illuminating major areas of concern. The first phase culminated in May 2014 with a final report outlining six recommendations.

ontbonne University professor Jack Luzkow joined host Don Marsh.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Jack Luzkow, professor of history at Fontbonne University, joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh to share details about his book “The Great Forgetting: The Past, Present and Future of Social Democracy and the Welfare State.”

In the book, Luzkow mentioned an array of social issues including the distribution of wealth, taxing the ‘1 percent’, health care, and more.

Benjamin Akande
Webster University

Last week, the Nigerian military rescued hundreds of kidnapped women and children from extremist group Boko Haram. Some of the rescued girls are from the same group kidnapped from a Nigerian school last year. More than 1,000 more remain missing.

Benjamin Ola Akande, Nigerian-born dean of Webster University’s School of Business and Technology, told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday the rescue was a result of “intensive military work and intelligence” on behalf of the Nigerian military.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Legislative session will end in two weeks and many issues remain unsolved. “St. Louis Public Radio” statehouse reporter Marshall Griffin is following the progress. He joined “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh Tuesday with updates.

Much of the session revolved around improving community policing.

Here is a list of legislative topics discussed during the interview:

St. Louis middle school girls become 'frog whisperers' in PBS show

Apr 29, 2015
Courtesy of PBS

Four St. Louis girls were selected to star in an episode of the PBS show SciGirls, which challenges middle school girls and their professional mentors to become citizen scientists by using skills in science, technology, engineering and math.

In the episode titled “Frog Whisperers,” the girls volunteer for FrogWatch USA, a citizen science project that encourages nature enthusiasts to report frog and toad calls in a given area.

IDEA Labs develops culture of innovation at Washington University

Apr 28, 2015
Host Don Marsh was joined by (from L to R) Erica Barnell, Cliff Holekamp and Ian Schillebeeckx.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Founded in 2013, IDEA Labs is a bioengineering design and entrepreneurship incubator at Washington University in which engineering and medical students work on unmet needs in healthcare to present entrepreneurial solutions.

Some of their primary objectives are to develop a culture of innovation at Washington University School of Medicine, and to teach engineering and medical students the skills and processes needed to invent and implement new biomedical technologies.

Host Don Marsh talked to (from L to R) Kris Kleindienst, Emily Hall and Holland Saltsman.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Mark your calendars, bookworms, because Independent Bookstore Day is Saturday, May 2 and various independently owned bookstores in the St. Louis area will host a day of fun, crafts, and yes—books!

Independent Bookstore Day was founded in 2014 in California and is modeled after the music world’s “Record Store Day.” Some of the participating bookstores in the St. Louis area are Left Bank Books in St. Louis, Main Street Books in St. Charles, and The Novel Neighbor in Webster Groves.

Sen. McCaskill's Flickr Page

Clearer skies might hang on the political horizon with the swearing in of Attorney General Loretta Lynch, but matters are not all clear just yet between Republicans and Democrats.

On Monday, Mo. Senator Claire McCaskill told St. Louis on the Air host, Don Marsh, that in order to achieve more heights, both parties must be willing to compromise. With a number of politicians from the Republican Party running for president, McCaskill says that matters of the here-and-now may become distracted. Those matters include a highway bill and the debt ceiling, among others.

The Whiffenpoofs of Yale
The Whiffenpoofs

Founded in 1909, the Whiffenpoofs of Yale University are the world’s oldest and best known collegiate a cappella ensemble.

They’ve performed at Carnegie Hall, at the White House, and on Saturday Night Live, and they’re performing in St. Louis this week.

Fourteen senior Yale men are selected each year to sing in the Whiffenpoofs. It’s highly competitive, not only for the prestige and tradition of the ensemble, but the travel opportunities.

(via Flickr/mike matney)

The city of St. Louis will soon have a civilian oversight board. And, new police cameras in the city aim to reduce crime, but do they infringe on privacy?

Those were just two of the topics before our legal roundtable guests, our monthly show that takes a look at relevant issues pertaining to the law.

Item displayed at “Capturing Hearts and Minds: Images of Nazi Propaganda and Disinformation” at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center
Julia Bishop-Cross / via Flickr

Two St. Louis exhibits closely examine the powerful role of propaganda during the rise of Nazi Germany.

The first is “Capturing Hearts and Minds: Images of Nazi Propaganda and Disinformation,” and is at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center. The other, at the Missouri History Museum, is a traveling exhibit from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum called, “State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.” 

Dr. William Chapman, surgical director of Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Transplant Center
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

April is National Donate Life Month, a time to remember the importance of organ and tissue donation, as more than 123,000 people are currently awaiting organ transplants in the United States.

(Map by Eric Fischer. Data from Census 2010. Base map © OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA)

Like St. Louis, Milwaukee is one of the most segregated cities in the United States.

Jennifer Morales is the author of a new book of that explores relationships between diverse groups.

“I tried to work in a wide range of interactions across group lines, whether that was age, gender or race,” Morales told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. The book is a collection of nine fictional short stories

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Even before events in Ferguson unfolded last August, the Organization of American Historians (OAH) was planning to hold a session about race relations in St. Louis.

The shooting death of Michael Brown and the ensuing community reaction brought on new meaning for the OAH, as the group convenes its 108th annual meeting April 16-19 in downtown St. Louis.

Author Benjamin Percy
Jennifer Percy

A flu epidemic and nuclear war have wiped out most of America and only a small number of humans survive in an outpost known as the Sanctuary, formerly the city of St. Louis.

This is the premise of Benjamin Percy’s new novel, “The Dead Lands,” which takes place in St. Louis and mirrors the Corps of Discovery in 1804. In the novel, two characters named Lewis Meriwether and Mina Clark lead a small group west to face the dangers of mutant creatures and a brutal army in hopes of discovering a land where civilization thrives.

Former Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.)
Michael Halsband / (Provided by the St. Louis County Library)

Former Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.) served in the U.S. House of Representatives for more than 30 years. In 2011, Frank announced he would not seek re-election in 2012.

“I was born with the ability to make people laugh and to enjoy humor. It has served me by keeping me sane,” Frank told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh during an interview recorded last Friday at the St. Louis County Library.

Barney Frank is the author of a new book, “Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage.”

Children from a St. Louis classroom who participate in the Ready Readers program.
Courtesy of Ready Readers

In celebration of D.E.A.R., “Drop Everything And Read,” day on April 12, we are taking a closer look at the importance of reading and getting books into the hands of children.  

Ready Readers is a St. Louis-based nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring preschool age children from low-income communities to love books and develop literacy skills necessary to become readers when they enter kindergarten.

On Thursday, "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh talked to Lisa Greening and Julia Auch of Ready Readers.

 

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