St. Louis on the Air

(via Flickr/mike matney)

The city of St. Louis will soon have a civilian oversight board. And, new police cameras in the city aim to reduce crime, but do they infringe on privacy?

Those were just two of the topics before our legal roundtable guests, our monthly show that takes a look at relevant issues pertaining to the law.

Item displayed at “Capturing Hearts and Minds: Images of Nazi Propaganda and Disinformation” at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center
Julia Bishop-Cross / via Flickr

Two St. Louis exhibits closely examine the powerful role of propaganda during the rise of Nazi Germany.

The first is “Capturing Hearts and Minds: Images of Nazi Propaganda and Disinformation,” and is at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center. The other, at the Missouri History Museum, is a traveling exhibit from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum called, “State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.” 

Dr. William Chapman, surgical director of Washington University and Barnes-Jewish Transplant Center
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

April is National Donate Life Month, a time to remember the importance of organ and tissue donation, as more than 123,000 people are currently awaiting organ transplants in the United States.

(Map by Eric Fischer. Data from Census 2010. Base map © OpenStreetMap, CC-BY-SA)

Like St. Louis, Milwaukee is one of the most segregated cities in the United States.

Jennifer Morales is the author of a new book of that explores relationships between diverse groups.

“I tried to work in a wide range of interactions across group lines, whether that was age, gender or race,” Morales told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. The book is a collection of nine fictional short stories

Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Even before events in Ferguson unfolded last August, the Organization of American Historians (OAH) was planning to hold a session about race relations in St. Louis.

The shooting death of Michael Brown and the ensuing community reaction brought on new meaning for the OAH, as the group convenes its 108th annual meeting April 16-19 in downtown St. Louis.

Author Benjamin Percy
Jennifer Percy

A flu epidemic and nuclear war have wiped out most of America and only a small number of humans survive in an outpost known as the Sanctuary, formerly the city of St. Louis.

This is the premise of Benjamin Percy’s new novel, “The Dead Lands,” which takes place in St. Louis and mirrors the Corps of Discovery in 1804. In the novel, two characters named Lewis Meriwether and Mina Clark lead a small group west to face the dangers of mutant creatures and a brutal army in hopes of discovering a land where civilization thrives.

Former Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.)
Michael Halsband / (Provided by the St. Louis County Library)

Former Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.) served in the U.S. House of Representatives for more than 30 years. In 2011, Frank announced he would not seek re-election in 2012.

“I was born with the ability to make people laugh and to enjoy humor. It has served me by keeping me sane,” Frank told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh during an interview recorded last Friday at the St. Louis County Library.

Barney Frank is the author of a new book, “Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage.”

Children from a St. Louis classroom who participate in the Ready Readers program.
Courtesy of Ready Readers

In celebration of D.E.A.R., “Drop Everything And Read,” day on April 12, we are taking a closer look at the importance of reading and getting books into the hands of children.  

Ready Readers is a St. Louis-based nonprofit organization dedicated to inspiring preschool age children from low-income communities to love books and develop literacy skills necessary to become readers when they enter kindergarten.

On Thursday, "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh talked to Lisa Greening and Julia Auch of Ready Readers.


Phil Donato is the "Trivia Guy."
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Trivia nights are part of the culture of St. Louis. On weekends it’s not uncommon to find several of the events, which are most often fundraisers for nonprofit organizations.

Phil Donato is St. Louis’ “Trivia Guy.” He’s is also the marketing, events and outreach manager at St. Louis Public Radio.

“It just brings a lot of people together … friends, families and co-workers to unwind. It’s a blue-collar, informal thing,” Donato told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Wednesday.

Missouri Gov. Alexander McNair's residence was at the northwest corner of Main and Spruce Streets. Daguerreotype by Thomas M. Easterly, 1850.
Courtesy of the Missouri History Museum

Many of St. Louis’ buildings have been lost to time, disaster, or destruction. It may seem like an inevitable byproduct of progress, but what do we lose when we lose a historic building? 

“Sometimes what we lose is so much more than the physical structure, it’s our collective, shared memory,” said Andrew Wanko, public historian at the Missouri History Museum, in a conversation with “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Tuesday.

"Lost Buildings of St. Louis" is a new exhibit at the museum that shares the stories behind many of St. Louis’ lost buildings.