St. Louis on the Air

Brittany Packnett, Teach for America–St. Louis' executive director, talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on March 18, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Teachers are typically well informed. They know how and where to track down data, they brainstorm ideas and they work with people.

So when Brittany Packnett, Teach for America–St. Louis’ executive director, was named to the president’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, she was in for a few surprises.

St. Louis Alderman Antonio French talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on March 17, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Alderman Antonio French was one of the most visible people in Ferguson, the city and related social media, last summer and fall after the shooting death of Michael Brown.

Since then, French has shifted his attention back to the 21st Ward and North Campus, an education-based community program that helps parents and students. But he’s also still active in Ferguson efforts.

Michel Martin
Doby Photography / NPR

The last time NPR’s Michel Martin was in St. Louis, tensions were high and wounds were fresh. Martin hosted a heated St. Louis Public Radio community forum in August.

Martin is returning to St. Louis and Ferguson on Monday, when she will again moderate a community forum.

Author Eric Greitens talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on March 16, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

While he said he hasn’t committed to running for governor in Missouri, St. Louisan Eric Greitens certainly sounds like a politician.

“I’m actively considering looking at running for governor in 2016,” he told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Monday. Greitens is a former Navy SEAL and combat veteran, a Rhodes Scholar, a boxing champion, a humanitarian leader and founded The Mission Continues, which helps veterans adjust to life at home.

Cornell University political science professor and author Suzanne Mettler talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on March 16, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Millions of students are enrolled in college, but graduation rates are uneven. Why? Author Suzanne Mettler says political squabbling is to blame.

Mettler, a political science professor at Cornell University, has written a book that lays out the problem and its solution: “Degrees of Inequality: The Demise of Opportunity in Higher Education and How to Restore the American Dream.”

A rendering of the planned jobs center was unveiled by the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis on Monday.
Maria Altman, St. Louis Public Radio

What became a symbol of the unrest in Ferguson after the death of Michael Brown on Aug. 9 will become a "phoenix rising."

That's the hope of officials with the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis who are planning a $500,000 jobs center on the site of the burned-out QuikTrip at 9240 W. Florissant Ave. 

Author Marcia Chatelain talks to 'St. Louis on the Air' host Don Marsh on March 12, 2015, at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Known as the Great Migration, 6 million African-Americans left their homes in the South after World War I and through 1970, moving north and west.

Eleven members of the Vatterott family participated in a march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., on March 7, 2015, the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, a civil rights march that ended when protesters were beaten by police.
Courtesy of Greg Holden

Sunday marked the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, a civil rights march in Selma, Ala., that ended when hundreds of demonstrators were attacked and beaten by police.

Two days after Bloody Sunday, Charles F. Vatterott Jr. funded, coordinated and participated in a St. Louis delegation of religious leaders and laypeople who traveled to Selma for a one-day peaceful protest.

The St. Louis Stamping Co. sits in the shadow of the proposed NFL stadium in St. Louis. The six-building complex, at Cass Avenue and First Street, Florida and Collins streets, was built in 1871 and 1913.
Google Streetview

Much has been made of what St. Louis could gain with a new NFL stadium, but what about the things it could lose?

The proposed plans for the stadium include demolishing two dozen buildings, including the St. Louis Stamping Co. buildings and the Cotton Belt Freight Depot. Both are part of the National Register of Historic Places, but that doesn’t provide protection — it denotes the building has historic significance.

Dr. Duru Sakhrani, left, and Valerie Carter-Thomas talk to "St. Louis on the Air" host Don Marsh on March 11, 2015 at St. Louis Public Radio in St. Louis.
Alex Heuer / St. Louis Public Radio

Violence affects all of us. But for children, violence can be particularly difficult to cope with and understand.

Compounding the issue, there’s not a specific type or source of violence to address.

“It’s violence in the home; violence in the streets. It’s exposure to violence, the length of exposure, the amount of exposure, the pervasiveness of exposure,” Dr. Duru Sakhrani, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at Mercy Children’s Hospital St. Louis, told “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh on Wednesday.

Pages