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St. Louis American

Philando Castile's sister, Allysza Castile, speaks outside the Ramsey County Courthouse in St. Paul, Minn. after a not guilty verdict was delivered in the trial of Officer Jeronimo Yanez on June 16, 2017.
Lorie Shaull | Flickr

This article originally appeared in the St. Louis American.

Philando Castile’s family in St. Louis was watching on June 16 as a Minnesota jury acquitted the police officer who fatally shot Castile, a 32-year-old black man, during a traffic stop last year in suburb of St. Paul, Minn.

“Everyone’s heart fell to the ground,” said Stacy Castile, Philando Castile's uncle who lives in St. Louis. “We just lost him all over again.”

What makes something news? It’s a question journalists ask themselves every day.

Whether it’s a breaking story or a scheduled event, news editors and managers have to decide whether or not to cover it.

After months and months of election coverage, Don Crozier was frustrated by what he saw as sensationalism and bias in the media. He worried that news had become too focused on entertainment or shock in the hunt for clicks and shares.

Crozier wanted to learn more about how news directors make decisions, so he turned to St. Louis Public Radio’s Curious Louis.

Linda Lockhart, Alvin Reid and Chris King reflected on colleague George Curry's life on Friday's "St. Louis on the Air." Curry died last week at the age of 69, but left a journalistic legacy to be admired.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

In our weekly "Behind the Headlines" segment, St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh discussed the top news stories that caught St. Louisans’ attention this week, with the people who produced them and contributed to them.

Courtesy: St. Louis American

The St. Louis American has a circulation of 70,000 and is the largest weekly in Missouri targeting African American readers.  It reaches 40-45 percent of black households in the St. Louis metropolitan area.

It has received top national honors for journalistic excellence several times and it was named the best African American newspaper in the country in 2006. 

Host Don Marsh spoke with Dr. Donald Suggs, the principal owner, publisher and executive editor of the newspaper for the last three decades.