St. Louis Beacon | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis Beacon

St. Louis Public Radio Leaders Share Merger Insights

Jul 22, 2014
file photo

Seven months ago, the St. Louis Beacon and St. Louis Public Radio officially merged. What’s happened? And what’s next? St. Louis Public Radio general manager, Tim Eby, and news editor Margaret Wolf Freivogel joined host Don Marsh to talk about where the organization is today.  

file photo

Yesterday, St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon became one. We’ve kept you up to date throughout the merger process. But now that the merger is complete, we wanted to take the opportunity to answer your questions.

Director and General Manager Tim Eby, formerly general manager of St. Louis Public Radio, and Editor Margaret Wolf Freivogel, founder of the Beacon, responded to your queries and commented about their vision for the merged organization.

Why merge?

Welcome To St. Louis Public Radio And The Beacon

Dec 9, 2013
Margaret Wolf Freivogel
Beacon File Photo

Monday, St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon merged. This milestone marks the end of more than a year of effort. But in a sense, we've just broken ground for the news organization we intend to build.

Its foundation is constructed from solid principles. We believe that facts matter. We believe that fairness matters. We believe that if we pay attention to facts and fairness, then our work will matter to you and the future of our region.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: St. Louis Magazine once dubbed us “earnest and wonky”:

“The Beacon, which is so smart and serious, reading it feels like the intellectual equivalent of flossing.”

We took that as a compliment. After all, daily flossing is not a bad thing.

(File images)

During the University of Missouri Board of Curators' two-day meeting at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the board unanimously approved the merger of the non-profit news organizations St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon, which is expected to be completed next month.

Leadership at both organizations has been planning the merger for more than a year.

St. Louis Public Radio’s license is held by the University of Missouri Curators, and the merger required the board’s approval.

 2013 arch photo
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Beacon

Today officials are set to break ground on the Central Riverfront phase of the CityArchRiver project, which brings $23 million worth of improvements to Leonor K. Sullivan Boulevard and which should be done by October 2015. Among the most visible improvements: Elevating the road out of the Mississippi River floodplain.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon: Steven Peterson of Belleville is one of 4.2 million Americans who will find out in the next few weeks how much -- if any -- compensation they will receive from their lenders after a government-ordered review of questionable foreclosure processes.

Peterson isn’t expecting much, although his mortgage servicer – PNC Mortgage – was one of 13 companies that earlier this year reached a settlement with federal banking regulators from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Federal Reserve Bank.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

The St. Louis Beacon’s Washington Correspondent Rob Koenig was Don Marsh’s guest on “St.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

Don Marsh called upon the St.

Will Copeland, at left, with his brothers at age 3 and, at right, age 4.
Provided by the Copeland family

The last time transgender teen William Copeland wore a dress was to his aunt’s commitment ceremony. The 5-year-old caved to parental pressure but on his terms: no bow in the back and only for the vows, not the reception.

“Big mistake! Huge mistake!,” his mother Laurie Copeland winces. “Why did he need to wear a dress to a lesbian wedding? They wouldn’t have cared if he’d worn a tux.”

Despite any early missteps, if you could special-order a family for a transgender child, it would be the Copelands of Creve Coeur.

Kelly Hamilton
2013 File Photo | St. Louis Beacon

When Kelly Hamilton was 5, he stole his little brother’s tighty whities. He hid his bathing suit top, swearing it was lost when it was really stuffed in a drawer.

Once, in their shared bed, he was surprised to hear his older sister say, “You know the doctors can turn you into a boy now.”

Hamilton, a transgender man, doesn’t ever remember telling his sister he wanted to be a boy. Sometimes family just knows. But in 1980s Dallas, Texas, parents weren’t exactly embracing gender variance.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

The 113th U.S. Congress has been in session for 5 weeks.  Host Don Marsh checked in with the St. Louis Beacon’s Washington correspondent Rob Koenig to get an update on the activities of the Missouri and Illinois delegations.

A warm time lapse welcome from the St. Louis Beacon

Jun 18, 2012

Check out this handiwork by Brent Jones of The St. Louis Beacon, one of our new neighbors in Grand Center. It's a time lapse video, as they say, 1 year in 1.5 minutes, and shows our building from groundbreaking to how it is today.

Jerry Naunheim Jr. | For the St. Louis Beacon

Note: This story was originally published in the St. Louis Beacon in 2011.

The end came without fanfare for the familiar blue and white water tower that had stood watch over the old Chrysler plant in Fenton through good times and bad: The icon was felled on a hot Saturday afternoon — and then hauled away like so much unwanted scrap.

Chris Paplanus, 54, who worked for Chrysler for 26 years, read about the Aug. 6 demolition on a Facebook page where former plant workers stay in touch, share personal news and job tips — and plan reunion gatherings.

Nearly a month into the restoration of Metro service, some Metro riders have jumped back aboard while others are still waiting for their bus.

The June 28 restoration, which Metro called a "soft launch," mainly increased frequency on MetroLink and the most crowded bus routes, said Jessica Mefford-Miller, Metro's chief of planning and system development.

Matt and Tom Smith
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Beacon | File photo

In high school, Matthew Smith busied himself designing websites, taking photos and making pottery. His younger brother, Tom, played trombone in the school jazz band, worked on his Eagle Scout badge and concentrated on honors classes in math, physics and geometry.

Like most teenagers preoccupied with their own pursuits, they didn't really notice anything unusual about their dad. But their friends did.

"They'd say, 'Your dad doesn't have any hair on his legs. Your dad's hair is really long'," said Matthew, 23.

Michelle and Debbie Smith
Nancy Fowler | St. Louis Beacon | File photo

Growing up with three brothers in a cramped house just outside Chicago, Michelle Smith delighted in the rare chance to slip into her mother's bra and black wig. As her heart pounded, her excitement was tempered only by the terror of being discovered. Had she been caught, Michelle feared her mother would not be amused by a 6-year-old's attempt to imitate mommy.

That's because Michelle was being raised as a son.

This article first appeared in the St. Louis Beacon, Nov. 26, 2008 - Aging is the one aspect of life that none of us avoids, but most of us hate being reminded of. A wide variety of theories have been advanced to explain why humans and other animals age. Most of them focus in one way or another on the general idea that cells, the basic building blocks of our bodies, simply wear out over time.