St. Louis Beacon

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Seven months ago, the St. Louis Beacon and St. Louis Public Radio officially merged. What’s happened? And what’s next? St. Louis Public Radio general manager, Tim Eby, and news editor Margaret Wolf Freivogel joined host Don Marsh to talk about where the organization is today.  

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Yesterday, St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon became one. We’ve kept you up to date throughout the merger process. But now that the merger is complete, we wanted to take the opportunity to answer your questions.

Director and General Manager Tim Eby, formerly general manager of St. Louis Public Radio, and Editor Margaret Wolf Freivogel, founder of the Beacon, responded to your queries and commented about their vision for the merged organization.

Why merge?

Margaret Wolf Freivogel
Beacon File Photo

Monday, St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon merged. This milestone marks the end of more than a year of effort. But in a sense, we've just broken ground for the news organization we intend to build.

Its foundation is constructed from solid principles. We believe that facts matter. We believe that fairness matters. We believe that if we pay attention to facts and fairness, then our work will matter to you and the future of our region.

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During the University of Missouri Board of Curators' two-day meeting at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the board unanimously approved the merger of the non-profit news organizations St. Louis Public Radio and the St. Louis Beacon, which is expected to be completed next month.

Leadership at both organizations has been planning the merger for more than a year.

St. Louis Public Radio’s license is held by the University of Missouri Curators, and the merger required the board’s approval.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

The St. Louis Beacon’s Washington Correspondent Rob Koenig was Don Marsh’s guest on “St.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

Don Marsh called upon the St.

Will Copeland, at left, with his brothers at age 3 and, at right, age 4.
Provided by the Copeland family

The last time transgender teen William Copeland wore a dress was to his aunt’s commitment ceremony. The 5-year-old caved to parental pressure but on his terms: no bow in the back and only for the vows, not the reception.

“Big mistake! Huge mistake!,” his mother Laurie Copeland winces. “Why did he need to wear a dress to a lesbian wedding? They wouldn’t have cared if he’d worn a tux.”

Despite any early missteps, if you could special-order a family for a transgender child, it would be the Copelands of Creve Coeur.

Kelly Hamilton
2013 File Photo | St. Louis Beacon

When Kelly Hamilton was 5, he stole his little brother’s tighty whities. He hid his bathing suit top, swearing it was lost when it was really stuffed in a drawer.

Once, in their shared bed, he was surprised to hear his older sister say, “You know the doctors can turn you into a boy now.”

Hamilton, a transgender man, doesn’t ever remember telling his sister he wanted to be a boy. Sometimes family just knows. But in 1980s Dallas, Texas, parents weren’t exactly embracing gender variance.

Evan C. Parker / Via Flickr

The 113th U.S. Congress has been in session for 5 weeks.  Host Don Marsh checked in with the St. Louis Beacon’s Washington correspondent Rob Koenig to get an update on the activities of the Missouri and Illinois delegations.

Check out this handiwork by Brent Jones of The St. Louis Beacon, one of our new neighbors in Grand Center. It's a time lapse video, as they say, 1 year in 1.5 minutes, and shows our building from groundbreaking to how it is today.

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